Mobil One

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I have heard mutterings among the racing fraternity (although not directly) about MOBIL 1 5/30 about how good it is in the classic racing machines,some say they are not throwing away cams after a season.
anybody out ther used it or had reports on it.....and just as a by the ways what in general what do you guys use... :D
 
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oil

Haven't heard anything bad about Mobil 1, although haven't heard anything good about it either.
I have used Valvoline 50wt for the past two summers, used Mobil 1 Vtwin 20-50 before that.
Ask ten different guys about oil, get ten different answers.
 
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Castrol 20-50W Vtwin oil for my '72 Interstate and my '51 Goldenflash - mind you, no racing here, just an occasional rally and some putting around...
 
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I used Mobil 1 (SAE 5W-50 as it was in the UK ) in my race bike for one season.
I used it because I had read reports of increased power output ( particularly from the Dr John Guzzis), but I didn't notice any power increase.
Friends did comment on the fact that the usual puff of blue smoke on the overrun was less noticable, but I didn't see any real benefit.
The possible downside, and I stress this may be a coincidence, was that on two occasions locktighted fixing in the engine came loose...the camshaft sprocket, and a the cam chain tensioner nuts both came loose on seperate occasions. They were both locktighted in and they have never come loose before or after I used the Mobil 1. Maybe I was a bit slack during that year's rebuild, maybe not. But I don't use it anymore.
The only time I have had a cam wear out was then, when the loose cam chain filled the oil full of aluminium.
I have been running a copy of the Axtell 5S cam since then.
The advantage I did notice with the Mobil 1 was that they sold it in my local supermarket and the kid there used to charge the wrong price...It was priced at £11.90 and the kid obviously didn't believe oil could cost that much and charged me £1.19.
The price tells you how long ago it was!
 

L.A.B.

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I'm still running my Commando on Silkolene Hardwick SAE50 detergent 'dinosaur juice' (in the summer) with no problems as yet.
 

ntst8

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I use Motul 15/50 because thats what goes in my Duc and it does more miles so gets first choice.
Used to use Dinosaur 20/50, having a senior moment and can't remeber the brand :roll: .
My oil pressure gauge reads 10psi lower cold and 10psi higher hot with the synthetic - both of which sound good to me. Only down side is that places that used to be oil tight now weep a bit, but i don't mind a bike that looks as though its been ridden.
 
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I've used mobil 1 for 15 someodd yrs now (15w 50) in my commando - really started because i lived in arizona and it is HOT there - 100 days over 100 F is not uncommon - bike always ran cooler (or seemed like it did) and idled better w/ the mobil 1
i now live in Texas and its damn hot here also so i keep the mobil 1 in - i like the stuff, and have stacked about 10k on the rebuilt motor w/ mobil 1 w/ no problems
but i don't race it around really and always change the stuff every 1000 miles
and i also run it in my Laverda 1200 and it likes it too

can't comment on if its better or worse than other oils- but has treated me well (i do use red line in my duc though just because i parnoid about the bevel gears wearing )
just wish i could find some kid in the market to sell it cheap!
mike
 
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I am a Mobil 1 zealot, at least as far as cars (and airplanes) are concerned. I was trained as an aeronautical engineer and know very well that you cant blow your nose around an airplane unless the FAA OKs it. Imagine my surprise when I learned (about 10 yrs ago) that the FAA had changed its mandatory 50-hr oil change interval for piston-engined aircraft to 200hr when using Mobil 1!! On top of that, the BMW car club (Ive been a member since 1974) took a new E36 3-series and ran it on a dynamometer in simulated driving with Mobil1 for 1,000,000 miles, then tore down the engine and found NO MEASURABLE WEAR!!!

I have just replaced ALL the fluids on my71 Commando with synthetics...we'l see!!

Best,

Frank
 
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I don't know if this link will work or not,but it's worth typing in, if not. Lot of info on oil,and interesting links.
broken link removed

Cheers
Bruce
 
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I'm about to do my first oil change in my Commando. The oil is the same as when I bought it n November so I figured it couldn't hurt. I'm thinking of going mobil 1 as well.

It gets to about +33 centigrade here in the summers so I'm guessing 20 W 50 or should I be going with 15 W 50? I used that in a Porsche I used to have with success.

What about synthetic blends? Yay or nay?
 
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Lots of experts will only recommend straight 40 or 50 and it works fine. One of the usual reasons for that is that our 50 + yr old designs were designed for those oils so that's what they should have! Norton themselves Ok'd 20/50 multigrades which if it's a high quality offers far better protection at high temps than a straight oil. They will maintain viscosity when a straight oil has started to break down. The synthetic anti's will never be parted from their vintage oils but all I know is the evidence I see in engines run on synthetics......wear is minimal. Do the oil change and if you have one check the magnetic sump plus for ferrous particles after a 1000 miles. Unless you have an engine going into meltdown you'll see a lot less with full synthetics.
One other objection to synthetic is that they are so slippery the rollers in Norton mains skid rather than roll so wear is increased!! I can see the logic but can't believe that happens.
I used to use M1 15/50 but found 20/50 Amsoil synthetic over here last year so that's what I use. It's not cheap but it makes me feel better.

Check out this article, it's one reason I started to use synthetics.

broken link removed
 
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Keith1069 said:
Lots of experts will only recommend straight 40 or 50 and it works fine. One of the usual reasons for that is that our 50 + yr old designs were designed for those oils so that's what they should have! Norton themselves Ok'd 20/50 multigrades which if it's a high quality offers far better protection at high temps than a straight oil. They will maintain viscosity when a straight oil has started to break down. The synthetic anti's will never be parted from their vintage oils but all I know is the evidence I see in engines run on synthetics......wear is minimal. Do the oil change and if you have one check the magnetic sump plus for ferrous particles after a 1000 miles. Unless you have an engine going into meltdown you'll see a lot less with full synthetics.
One other objection to synthetic is that they are so slippery the rollers in Norton mains skid rather than roll so wear is increased!! I can see the logic but can't believe that happens.
I used to use M1 15/50 but found 20/50 Amsoil synthetic over here last year so that's what I use. It's not cheap but it makes me feel better.

Check out this article, it's one reason I started to use synthetics.

broken link removed

Thanks Keith. I'll probably use a semi-synthetic for now until I get a rebuild done next winter. I remember when I switched to synthetic in my old 944, I discovered a few oil leaks that were not there before.
 
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I went out and bought some synthetic blend last night. I went down to my local Canadian Tire store and purchased some PJ1 Goldfire, premium 20W-50.

Any difference between 20W-50 for a car and some specifically for a motorcycle? The PJ1 says motorcycle or 4-stroke specific on the bottle. I can't imagine there would be any difference. Is there?
 
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It depends, the latest car oils lack zinc in order to prolong the life of the catalytic convertor, the zinc is very useful in an air cooled performance engine for protecting cams etc.
 
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kommando said:
It depends, the latest car oils lack zinc in order to prolong the life of the catalytic convertor, the zinc is very useful in an air cooled performance engine for protecting cams etc.

I did not know that. Makes sense now.

I am about to do my first oil change since I bought the bike in November, as the oil in the bike is quite dirty. I have not driven it yet due to about 2 feet of snow outside.

The manual states 2.8 litres of oil. Do I completely drain the crankcase and oil tank then simply pour all the replacement oil in the tank? I've only done oil changes on cars which dont have a seperate oil tank, so if I'm missing the obvious here someone fill me in.

I don't want to sound like a dumb-ass, but is it ok to simply fill the oil tank and let the engine cycle the oil through everything or should I pour some into the crankcase as well?

I appologize for hijacking the thread.
 
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Coco-you can just pour it in the oil tank,it'll get where it needs to go.I always give the bike several kicks with the ignition off,just to get the new oil moving around.One thing you definitely want to do,is look down into your oil tank,after you start it,and make sure the oil is returning back to the tank.Don't worry if it doesn't really squirt in,it'll just sort of drizzle in.

Sorry if I'm being obvious,but don't forget your bike has separate oil in the primary chaincase,and the transmission,that need attention also.

In addition to what Kommando said about motorcycle oil,four stroke cycle oil also contains a lot of friction modifiers for the clutch,and transmission on Japanese bikes, that we don't need,because our transmissions run separate oil. That stuff won't hurt our bikes,but it's paying for something we don't need. But,you should avoid running regular automotive oil,for the reason Kommando stated,and others. I recommend reading the link on my post above.

The link on my post above makes a good argument for using commercial diesel rated oil in our bikes,and I read an article by Kevin Cameron,in Cycle World, 5 or 6 years ago,that said basically the same thing. Convinced me anyway.All my bikes,except my Harley,are getting changed gradually over to Shell Rotella T.

Hope this helps!
:D
Cheers
Bruce
 
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CommandoRoadster said:
Coco-you can just pour it in the oil tank,it'll get where it needs to go.I always give the bike several kicks with the ignition off,just to get the new oil moving around.One thing you definitely want to do,is look down into your oil tank,after you start it,and make sure the oil is returning back to the tank.Don't worry if it doesn't really squirt in,it'll just sort of drizzle in.

Sorry if I'm being obvious,but don't forget your bike has separate oil in the primary chaincase,and the transmission,that need attention also.

In addition to what Kommando said about motorcycle oil,four stroke cycle oil also contains a lot of friction modifiers for the clutch,and transmission on Japanese bikes, that we don't need,because our transmissions run separate oil. That stuff won't hurt our bikes,but it's paying for something we don't need. But,you should avoid running regular automotive oil,for the reason Kommando stated,and others. I recommend reading the link on my post above.

The link on my post above makes a good argument for using commercial diesel rated oil in our bikes,and I read an article by Kevin Cameron,in Cycle World, 5 or 6 years ago,that said basically the same thing. Convinced me anyway.All my bikes,except my Harley,are getting changed gradually over to Shell Rotella T.

Hope this helps!
:D
Cheers
Bruce

Thanks Bruce. I was going to kick the motor a few times like you suggested to get the oil moving a bit so don't feel you were stating the obvious because without this forum, I probably would have put in regular automotive oil.

I know some guys are using ATF in the primary, but what about gear oil?

Any good brands of gear oil to look at?

Also, and good recommendations for fork oil as well. Iw as going to get PJ1 fork oil but I've heard a lot of people like Bel Ray.
 
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Coco- Yes,ATF in the primary.You can try synthetic if you want.Don't let anyone tell you it will make your clutch slip.If it would make your clutch slip,it wouldn't work very well in an automatic transmission,would it?:lol:

GL-4 90wt in the trans.Try to get GL-4,rather that GL-5,because GL-5 has a high sulpher content that allegedly deteriorates bronze trans bushings. Also steer away from the stuff made for limited slip differentials.It's not as slippery as the regular gear lube,and has been blamed for notchey shifting.Also,a couple of Norton guys,whos opinion I respect,are running 75w140 in the trannies on their hi-perf Commandos,and swear it makes the shifting slicker,especially under power.I'm going to try 75w140 Valvoline full synthetic,for my next gear lube change. Valvoline,because I can get a good discount at work. :roll:

I'm willing to listen to any arguments,as to why Bel-Ray is better than PJ1,or Torco,or Lucas,or any other light hydrolic oil. Lots of Commando riders run ATF in their forks. In fact,the manual for my '71 Roadster calls for type-F ATF, 10w30 or 10w40 motor oil. Right now,I'm running 20wt PJ1 in my forks. 8)

Do a search,on this website for primary oil,gear oil,and fork oil,and see what others say.Lots of knowledgeable people on this site!

Hope this helps!.
:D
Cheers,
Bruce
 
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I thought of Bel Ray fork oil from my mountain bike tech days. The Bel Ray had better anti foaming qualities than other mountain bike specific brands so that is what I used. I'm sure the 20 wt PJ1 is just as good and since the Canadian Tire store near me sells PJ1, I'll probably go that route.

I'll look into 75W 140 Valvoline for my gear box.

Thanks.
 
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I don't want to sound like a dumb-ass, but is it ok to simply fill the oil tank and let the engine cycle the oil through everything or should I pour some into the crankcase as well?

Coco

If you've never done it before, it's not a dumb question.

Just put the oil into the tank. Since the Norton engine is dry sump, it removes almost all of the oil from the sump when it's running. Oil works by leaving a lubricating film on the movable parts after the engine has stopped.

After changing oil, I like to observe the oil return line into the oil tank to ensure it is circulating. Takes a little while (10-20 seconds) to see oil returning to tank after starting it up. It will begin to squirt oil into the tank in pulses at idle, then become a steady stream when you rev it up.
 
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