Visit your friends while they are alive.

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Jun 30, 2012
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One of the things I never realised while I was younger, was the importance of keeping in touch with my friends. One of the main things which stops me from working on my motorcycle and going road racing again is GRIEF . I now deeply regret that I did not talk more to my friends while they were alive. My best friend lived 300 KM away and his son is a piece of work, so I tended to stay away. There are now things I would very much like to discuss with him, but he is in the ground. It is rare to find people with the right mentality. I have many other friends, but none whom I can really talk to who will really comprehend what I say to them.
 
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Well said , an unexpected death always brings up the “ what if’s” sadly we all carry that particular burden around with us …. best method for me at least is to , remember fondly , take a moment and reflect when you reminded of lost one , and then carry on … you get but one chance , so live it at full tilt …. taking the odd risk can bring out the thrill and joy fullness of life !
 
One of the things I never realised while I was younger, was the importance of keeping in touch with my friends. One of the main things which stops me from working on my motorcycle and going road racing again is GRIEF . I now deeply regret that I did not talk more to my friends while they were alive. My best friend lived 300 KM away and his son is a piece of work, so I tended to stay away. There are now things I would very much like to discuss with him, but he is in the ground. It is rare to find people with the right mentality. I have many other friends, but none whom I can really talk to who will really comprehend what I say to them.
Amen.
 
There's a quote that I like:
Good friends are people who know you well but like you anyway.
My best mate was a guy called Allan Greening. I first met him in about 1959. I used to fight with him regularly off an on over the years. He was blind in one eye, and still road-raced. He never seemed to worry about anything. If I ever went out with him on a Saturday night, he always knew where the gay parties were - we usually got chucked out. His 50's race bike was the first one I raced. It did similar to me as what it did to him - big crashes. In later years, he rode my Seeley Commando. I had never seem him so happy. When he was younger, he was a drunk - I don't know how he ever gave up the grog. When he was in his 70s, he died while driving his car - he had an enlarged heart which just stopped working. His car bounced off an oncoming vehicle, but that was not what killed him.
I don't know if he really liked me - whenever we went anywhere on motorcycles, it was always a deadly competition. There is a guy in the next town to me who knew both of us - he used to laugh at our interaction. I never raced against him on a circuit, But we were once on Winton Raceway together - he made sure he was on the other side of the circuit from me. He was worth beating. When we were kids, he could ride an old motorcycle with both wheels sliding sideways as we went around bends - two wheel drift.
 
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