1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Youngest and Oldest

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by Nater_Potater, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. frankdamp

    frankdamp

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    John in Texas:

    Perhaps the age distribution of Nathan's list is driven in part by the UK's driver's licence rules back in the 50's & 60's. You could legally ride a motorcycle at 16, but a car licence wasn't issued to people under 18. If one left school at 16 and started work, your only transportation options were public transport or a motorcycle. I rode the bus for a while, but the 90+ minutes each way got old real quick. It's possible some of the "colonies" had similar rules.

    When I started out in 1958, I don't think there were any age/engine size rules, but I started with a 150cc Vespa Clubman. After I passed the test, I moved up to an Ariel Leader 250. It looked enough like a scooter, my Mom didn't realise it wasn't one. A small car followed, then a BSA A7 (500 ccs) which hauled a single-seat sidecar for a while.

    My motorcycle ownership ended after I got married in 1964 and I didn't ride again until going to work for Norton-Villiers in 1966.
     
    Nater_Potater likes this.
  2. Nater_Potater

    Nater_Potater

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Growing up in Idaho with a fairly large agricultural population, you could take a driver's training course, and have a daytime-only license at the tender young age of 14! I still remember coming home late one afternoon in the Fall. People were flashing their highbeams at me, but I couldn't understand why until I was home, and realised I didn't have my headlights on. I'm just thankful none of those people were the local police!

    Nathan
     
  3. YukoNorton

    YukoNorton

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    In my earlier post, I talked about some of the bikes I owned, but not much about me; This is more about me:


    1964 Unit-construction; construction initiated in fall of 1963, production continued through the winter, ready to feel the breeze in late May. Large intake with no filter, frequently backfires, dirty exhaust with un-tuned set of pipes, head a bit warped but good compression. Bottom end a bit loose, has an oversize piston with a slightly bent long-stroke con rod, semi-rigid frame (cracked in a few locations) with stiff suspension. Runs best on a full tank of high-test, sometimes has difficulty stopping, rattles a bit and has some low speed vibrations on early mornings. Sometimes hard starting, especially in cold weather, but responds well to a pull start. Belt drive. Steers unpredictably. Lights are a bit dim, has extra lenses, but electrical system prone to shorting out. Overall in good condition for the year with a bit of rust and a few cosmetic blemishes. Needs regular lubrication and occasional tune-ups.
     
    Nater_Potater likes this.
  4. Pedro500

    Pedro500

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2016
    No leaks?
     
  5. YukoNorton

    YukoNorton

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Thanks Pedro, I forgot to mention that; multiple leaks on a daily basis, almost like a total loss system. It seems that no matter how many pints of coolant that are added, the same amount leaks out! A bit of a complicated liquid/air cooled process. Fortunately none from the primary pump or distribution system.
     
  6. NortonMKIIA850

    NortonMKIIA850

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Big end rattles? Piston slap?
     
  7. YukoNorton

    YukoNorton

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Thanks MKII, It's just a rattle at the intake (which sometimes is also the exhaust). The big end is a bit loose, so location for timing is critical. Piston slap is only noticeable at high speed, so lower speeds are better, but then need to watch out for low speed vibrations (typical when cold, runnin' lean).
     
    NortonMKIIA850 likes this.
  8. arch

    arch VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    67, in a few weeks. I am passing this addiction on to a 17 year old family member. I let him do much of the wrenching while I supervise. If you are going to ride a classic bike, you need to know how to work on them, right?

    I bought my 1974 new. It was late in 1975. They had the 1975 models on the floor but I paid a little more for the ‘74 model. I think I paid $2300.00 for it. They wanted $2000.00 for the ‘75 models

    It is going to get a major refreshing this winter. New paint, engine rebuild, new fenders, new wiring and on and on.
     
  9. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Hope you not giving up riding at 67.

    Ashley
     
  10. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    I bought my 1974 new. It was late in 1975. They had the 1975 models on the floor but I paid a little more for the ‘74 model. I think I paid $2300.00 for it. They wanted $2000.00 for the ‘75 models

    It is going to get a major refreshing this winter. New paint, engine rebuild, new fenders, new wiring and on and on.[/QUOTE]

    I also brought my 74 Norton new but it was June 76 when I brought it, I was 17years old, there were two 74s left in Brisbane payed $1,999 on the road, they had the 75 models on the floor but the old stock was $450 cheaper, it has never let me down in all that time but has had major changes, converted to a Featherbed frame in the early 80s and rebuilt with the motor for the Featherbed and using most of the orginal Commando parts as possible.

    Ashley
     
  11. luckyed

    luckyed

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    I'll be 66 later this month. My avatar shows me with my first Commando, a 1971 (non Combat) sometime around 1973-74. Sold it to buy a 1974 Laverda 750sf somewhere around 1975. Sold that later in the '70s to buy a 1966 Austin Healey 3000. Many of you know the story: through the years I wished I had held on to both bikes.(the Healey too!) A couple of months ago found a 1972 ( mfg. August '72) here in my local area in very good original condition that had been stored and not run much (if at all) for 15 years or so. (The Avon Super Venoms were manufactured in the late 1990s! Took a couple of short test rides after I got it running, tires were hard as a rock and pretty f' ing slippery.) It has the 932 carbs and front disc that I believe were standard at that point in the production, along with an early (fully functional) Boyer MK3 ignition, and, in what I took to be a "sign", an original period Dunstall 2 into 1 into 2 exhaust like I installed on my '71 back in the day. Still sorting a few things out, but made a 75 mile run recently on new Avon Roadriders and it's running great. Still crazy after all these years!
     
    Nater_Potater and NortonMKIIA850 like this.

Share This Page

Loading...