Frankenbike

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Another newbie question.

I’ve stripped, primed and painted the triple trees the correct silver and installed my fork legs.

I tightened the bottom nut as tight as I could get it. The problem is that there is about a 1\4” play with the fork ears?

I checked the manual and there isn’t a washer or spacer that I’m missing that I can see.

With all of this isolastics and energy put into no vibrations, I find it odd that the fork ears have that much play.

What am I missing?
 
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Never mind. I just double checked the manual again and what I thought was referencing the spring inside the tube was actually two O-Rings that sit in the fork leg presumably to eliminate the slop in the fork ears. I guess the legs got to come back off.
 

L.A.B.

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I just double checked the manual again and what I thought was referencing the spring inside the tube was actually two O-Rings that sit in the fork leg presumably to eliminate the slop in the fork ears. I guess the legs got to come back off.
There should be three O-rings (two below and one above) the bracket tube on each side.
 
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There should be three O-rings (two below and one above) the bracket tube on each side.
Thanks, my next frustration is where to find them?

I just searched three of the “known” parts suppliers and the part number 061900 or 06-1900 come up with “no parts match”.

Any advice or suggestions?
 

L.A.B.

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Last edited:
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They can be a right pia to install. If you try to push the fork leg up through the fork ear with the orings assembled and the triple tree tight, the orings will slide out of place. Best way I've found is to leave the triple trees loose enough to do the following. Feed the fork leg up through the bottom triple tree, then slide two of the orings over the fork leg. Now slide the fork ear into place. Push the fork leg up through the ear and put the last oring over the fork leg. Now start the leg up into the top tree a bit. Tighten the pinch bolt on the bottom tree to hold it in place. Repeat the process on the other side. Now tighten the bolt at the bottom of the tree to bring the upper and lower in place and torque. Now you can loosen the pinch bolts and slide the legs all the way up into the top tree. Install the large fork nuts by first treading them on to the top of the rod through the fork springs. Now torque down the fork nuts then torque the pinch bolts.
 

gortnipper

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Smear the orings with a bit of very sticky grease, it will help keep them in place for assembly.
 
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Thanks guys, appreciate the advice. I’ll let you know how it goes when the o rings arrive.
 

Richard Tool

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Hi Steve - be sure to read through page 5 of Ben’s Interstate Rebuild in this forum regarding assembly of the yokes and headlamp brackets to avoid additional pit falls.
 
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Some small parts have been coming and I’m done touching up the frame. Yokes are stripped and painted and all aluminum has been polished. If it needs a new a bolt, it’s new British stainless.

Today the center stand came so now I have the cradle, swing arm, center stand and side stand.I’ll sand blast these when my cabinet comes next week ( my son got it for me for Christmas), then they’ll be primed and painted.

It’s come a long way since a bare frame.

PS: unintentional advertising with the white sticker. I noticed it after I took these pictures. Not sure who it is, but I thought it looked cool and it came with parts
















 
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gortnipper

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Be sure to do the drilling for the Kegler mod on the swingarm before you blast and paint it.

You dont really need the jig.

 
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johnm

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Perhaps a bit late to say this but it's worth while looking at the Worlds Straightest Commando article. Nine out of ten swinging arms are twisted and it's definitely a good idea machining the isolastic tubes square so the clearance can be accurate. Also a good aftermarket head steady is worth the money. I have a Dave Taylor but most vendors have other options as well. They really improve steering in corners and very noticeable on roundabouts.

Check you forks are straight and parallel. Fork yokes are commonly bent.

Check wheel alignment. The front wheel rim should be central between the forks.

I did all this and found twists and misalignment everywhere. On a bike that showed no sign of frame damage.
 
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Perhaps a bit late to say this but it's worth while looking at the Worlds Straightest Commando article. Nine out of ten swinging arms are twisted and it's definitely a good idea machining the isolastic tubes square so the clearance can be accurate. Also a good aftermarket head steady is worth the money. I have a Dave Taylor but most vendors have other options as well. They really improve steering in corners and very noticeable on roundabouts.

Check you forks are straight and parallel. Fork yokes are commonly bent.

Check wheel alignment. The front wheel rim should be central between the forks.

I did all this and found twists and misalignment everywhere. On a bike that showed no sign of frame damage.
All great advice, thanks
 

L.A.B.

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have a lead on some rims.
If original Dunlop, make sure they are the correct rims.

The front disc rim should be stamped (WM2-19) 'MC275' or MC288.
The drum rear rim should be (WM2-19) MB41.
 
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