amal resleeving

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dmellish said:
does anyone resleeve amals east of the mississippi in the states?

I have never heard of anyone in the eastern US who resleeves Amals. There is a guy in southern Ontario named Bruce Chessell (Triton Engineering) who does them and apparently does a nice job. He seems to be recommended by several of the folks on the AJS/Matchless Forum. It is not a big deal to send used parts in and out of Canada. AMR in Tucson also does resleeving. I just sent an Amal Monobloc to Andy Hardan at Lund Machining in Snohomish WA. I'll let you know how it turns out.
 
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AMR has been doing it a long time. They did the ones on my Bonneville way back in the early 80s, and they still work fine.
 
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I had AMR do my Fastback carbs about 10 years ago, and I just sent my 850's carbs to him to be done. After 20k miles my Fastback still idles great. I like the way he does the job; instead of sleeving the original slides, he substitutes a hard chromed plated brass slide from a Mikuni. Using a Mikuni slide requires that you remove the chokes from your carbs, but it has never cause me any problem - that's what the ticklers are for!

Hope this helps,
 
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And I can recommend Bruce Chessell. He did my carbs and they turned out great.

The thing I didn't like about AMR is you lose the chokes. That's fine if you live in AZ or TX, but here in Colo that doesn't work unless you only ride in the summer.

Debby
 
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Digging up an old thread here.

So what's the verdict? AMR, Lund or Triton? Wouldn't a harder slide than brass be better like what AMR or Lund use? I don't have chokes on the carbs now anyway.

I am going to send a brand new pair of Amals in and be done with it.
 
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I think the verdict is they all do good work.

Also you'd be better off sending in an old set of Amals. Quality of the new ones leaves a lot to be desired from what I hear. And if you did get a good set they wouldn't need sleeving for at least 20K miles or so. Actually the slides are said to be chrome plated now so they might last a lot longer than that. Of course, slide breakage due to hydrogen embrittlement might be an issue.

It's always something...

Debby
 
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debby said:
I think the verdict is they all do good work.

Also you'd be better off sending in an old set of Amals. Quality of the new ones leaves a lot to be desired from what I hear. And if you did get a good set they wouldn't need sleeving for at least 20K miles or so. Actually the slides are said to be chrome plated now so they might last a lot longer than that. Of course, slide breakage due to hydrogen embrittlement might be an issue.

It's always something...

Debby

I figured I'd just get it over with as the quality (like you mentioned) doesn't seem so great on these new Amals. This is my first pair of Amals so I want everything perfect before I start fussing with them.

It seems AMR and Triton do a similar slide and use chrome plated brass while Lund uses steel.
 

batrider

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I've had carb work done by Bruce Chessel and Andy at Lund. Both excellent. Coco, since you are in Canada anyway it might be helpful to just call Bruce and ask him about his process. He is a really nice guy.

I don't think the wear improvement has to do with the hardness. It has to do with the metals being dissimilar after sleeving. But I ain't no metallurgist...

Russ
 
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batrider said:
I've had carb work done by Bruce Chessel and Andy at Lund. Both excellent. Coco, since you are in Canada anyway it might be helpful to just call Bruce and ask him about his process. He is a really nice guy.

I don't think the wear improvement has to do with the hardness. It has to do with the metals being dissimilar after sleeving. But I ain't no metallurgist...

Russ

I just e-mailed Bruce. It will be far cheaper keeping those up here anyway than sending them down to the USA. The exchange rate is pretty crappy right now.
 
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carb sleeving

I would recommend if you have a new set of amals to bin the slides and order a set of hard chrome plated ones from RGM. The hard material running against soft avoids the issue of the materials 'picking up' on each other. Of course, a better solution would be to have hard bores and soft slides so you could buy new slides instead of new bodies.

I had an old set of amals (monoblock) on my Triton which I had 'refurbished' by autocycle in Birmingham (UK not Alabama). He put a set of brass slides in. I think he probable honed out the bores and fit oversize slides. They work great but the bike never idled with them. Also brass is soft like Aluminium monkey metal bodies.

I have a new set of amals from RGM that idle lovely. I will get the chrome slides to prolong life.
 
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Hydrogen embrittlement is a fascinating subject that pops up from time to to time in my industry.

I'm not sure we know all we know about HE, but I doubt that it would be an issue with chrome plated carburetor slides. High-strength steels, such as those used in manufacturing socket head cap screws and ultra-high-strength bolts are definitely susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. But materials such as brass, stainless steel, and aluminum are not so susceptible and, some say, immune to HE. And any reported failures in plated brass components can often be traced to other issues, such as stress risers owing to cracks in the plating. Chances are the carburetor slides are made from soft brass, which should not fracture under normal use. Notably, releasing the throttle suddenly from a full-open position, allowing the slide to "crash" down on the stop-screw, may cause some cast brass material to fracture, regardless of plating.
 
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