750 clutch woes

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Aug 23, 2004
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Hiya!

I was investigating the sticky clutch on my commando today, and think that I identified the problem. I see that there are deep gouges in the clutch centre so I was going to remove it for repair/replacement.

In my haynes manual, and the Norton Factory shop manual, it looks like I should be able to remove the clutch centre while leaving the clutch sprocket/backplate in place. I got the nut and tabbed washer off without problems. However, careful pulling, and a few blows with the rubber hammer didn't have any effect. Am I missing something? Do I have to remove the engine sprocket and clutch backing plate as well? There is no puller tool mentioned in either manual...?

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

Ron L

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Skippy,
Engine sprocket, chain, and clutch must be removed as a unit. Then you remove the snap ring from BEHIND the clutch basket to separate the clutch center. You need a puller to remove the engine sprocket, but it is simple to make or use a steering wheel puller.
 
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Thanks Ron!

Good thing I left the garage before frustration reached the "crowbar and mini sledge" level! :wink:
 
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when you replace the clutch basket with it's nice new center...mind the tiny ring on the tranny shaft is correctly seated and in good shape, so the basket sits snug against it when you slide it back onto the shaft... or the basket will go too far in and allignment of the primary chain will be for the birds:wink:
 

Ron L

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Good point, Hewho,

I would go one better and get a new circlip when you order the clutch center. By the way, the later model clutch centers were hardened to prevent the plates from making notches in it. These can be identified by the distinctive plunk when tapped with a wrench or hammer.

It was rumored that early style Barnett clutch plates would notch the hubs quickly, but later (post '90's??) designs were much better. If you are buying new plates, my first choice is Sureflex, with Barnett in second.
 
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Remember also not to over-tighten the center nut with the tab washer...too tight and it will push the new ring on the shaft out of it's groove, or bend it in, and the chain will end up misalligned, and the fact that the basket has no solid seating/position, will cause all sorts of problems keeping an adjust on the clutch, cable, etc... :wink:
 
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Ron L said:
Good point, Hewho,


It was rumored that early style Barnett clutch plates would notch the hubs quickly, but later (post '90's??) designs were much better. If you are buying new plates, my first choice is Sureflex, with Barnett in second.

my experance with barnett has been that the splines on them wear faster than a hub and have a tendencie to stick if oiled with gearbox oil.
I second the surflex as # 1. I am running a 5 friction surflex setup with a belt drive dry along with a clutch rod seal. this is a wounderfully light pulling no drag no slip clutch, I can even select nuterel at a dead stop.

bill
 
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