650 SS Dommi Racer build

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Oct 10, 2010
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Jeandr said:
I got the rose joints on e-bay from a guy in the UK (mcgillmotorsports). You can get the same and better (stainless steel) from McMaster-Carr and they also have the connecting links in many different lenghts.

Jean
Jean,

I checked McMaster out and they do have a nice selection or rod ends, but I expected the SS to be a little pricey. A 3/8 SS Rod End has around 3000 lbs load capacity for $16.00. Could you give some details / specs on the bearings you used?
 
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Feb 28, 2009
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beng said:
Foxy, that is a great head steady. Steel is twice as stiff as aluminum, and has a lower expansion rate.

The late Manx Nortons have a neat steel head-steady that is adjustable, you put it in then you can tighten it up so it is in a bit of tension, you can see how that would help pre-load the chassis and stabilize it a bit.

Alloy engine plates and mounts are easy to make because the material is so workable, but they have to be twice as thick as steel plates to get it's stiffness, and when you do that they weigh almost the same as steel.

Thanks beng, I would have loved to have used alloy but as you state its got to be twice the thickness and I wanted as much clearance between it and the tank. I do believe that some build dont bother having a head steady as the bottom plates used are stiff enough providing you dont hit a curb etc head on.
Because they expand so much when hot the primary chain has to be run looser initially, and they can even push the frame of the bike out of shape.
Mmmm... never thought of that, gets bloody hot here in Oztralia!!

The old race-bike I threw up a photo of came with steel plates from the works, was tried with alloy plates by it's long-time tuner, then it was switched back to steel because they worked better in every way.

I used to think titanium would be a great material for engine plates and mounts, but then I found out it is way less stiff than steel and heavier than aluminum, not worth it's cost in that application anyway.


I also thought about using rose joints as I like that adjustability and look, but something round makes it hard to mount ignition boxes etc on to? My small byplane uses them on controls and wing struts and are very strong (have to be :mrgreen: )!
 
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Caferider said:
Jeandr said:
I got the rose joints on e-bay from a guy in the UK (mcgillmotorsports). You can get the same and better (stainless steel) from McMaster-Carr and they also have the connecting links in many different lenghts.

Jean
Jean,

I checked McMaster out and they do have a nice selection or rod ends, but I expected the SS to be a little pricey. A 3/8 SS Rod End has around 3000 lbs load capacity for $16.00. Could you give some details / specs on the bearings you used?
The ones I bought have 1/2-20 threads and the hole is 1/2", they are supposed to be good for 16,000 pounds of force (applied where ???) so I am sure they are overkill, but the price was right and having them all the same is easier on fabrication. I made my connecting links out of aluminium because that is what Mc Master Carr is selling.

Jean
 
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Foxy said:
beng said:
I do believe that some build dont bother having a head steady as the bottom plates used are stiff enough providing you dont hit a curb etc head on.)!
There isn't much longditudinal bracing of the steering head on a Featherbed without a head steady. High speed on a bumpy road puts some hard knocks through it.
 
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Hi , about head steady, what do you think guys, when using an alloy barrel, must we take in count the 'growing up" of the jugs due to heat , I guess yes but .............
 
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marinatlas said:
Hi , about head steady, what do you think guys, when using an alloy barrel, must we take in count the 'growing up" of the jugs due to heat , I guess yes but .............
No. Not worth worrying about. Even with the most rigid head steady, the frame would flex enough.
 
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marinatlas said:
Hi , about head steady, what do you think guys, when using an alloy barrel, must we take in count the 'growing up" of the jugs due to heat , I guess yes but .............
Yes, I would think so. But assuming it grew taller the rod bearing would pivot up with the expansion of the head.

I was thinking of something like this.


It would allow some vertical movement but restrict any forward movement.
 
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Jan 21, 2011
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Head steady Norton supplied my forlorn 59' Manx with:



Second hole in end near steering head is for tank strap.
 
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I noticed a dent in the frame from where the fork tubes slapped it. Upon further inspection, I saw that the tab for the steering stop is bent allowing the fork tubes to hit the frame on both sides. I have been scouring the web looking for a detailed pic or diagram of the steering stops so I can bend them back into place and repair the frame.




There are threaded holes in the Stop tab and the lower tree. I have looked in several manuals and cant find any details on steering stop.
Is there blocks that mount to the tab?

 
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Ah :!: Mine (1961 650 Manxman frame) is bolted on, on your frame, that welded piece shoud be bent up.

Jean
 
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Jeandr said:
Ah :!: Mine (1961 650 Manxman frame) is bolted on, on your frame, that welded piece shoud be bent up.

Jean
Assuming that I have the steering head built up right to get the right alignment. Cant find any info on this either, just a diagram showing sealed bearings not loose balls.
The tab just needs to be heated and bent back so that the tree hits it?

What are the bolt holes for?
 
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Jan 21, 2011
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I have a 66' 650ss in a basket I took a look at. The steering stop is set so it is parallel with the bottom face of the steering head tube. So maybe heat yours up with a torch and tap it up until it works.

The hole in the bottom yoke is for an optional steering damper assembly.

There is not too much to miss when you put the fork yokes in the steering head. The bearing race goes on the lower yoke and the other goes in the frame. There is a dust cover on the top but not the bottom. Then on top of the upper dust cover you have your adjusting nut, the top yoke then a washer and the locknut.
 
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beng said:
I have a 66' 650ss in a basket I took a look at. The steering stop is set so it is parallel with the bottom face of the steering head tube. So maybe heat yours up with a torch and tap it up until it works.

The hole in the bottom yoke is for an optional steering damper assembly.

There is not too much to miss when you put the fork yokes in the steering head. The bearing race goes on the lower yoke and the other goes in the frame. There is a dust cover on the top but not the bottom. Then on top of the upper dust cover you have your adjusting nut, the top yoke then a washer and the locknut.

Thats exactly how I have it and I just got fresh gas and am going to hit it with the torch after lunch.

Thanks
 
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Ok its been a while, since my last update, so Ill try to make it brief.

Last time I checked in I was working on the front end. The stops were heated and bent back into place, most of the body work finished on the front tins.



The tins were blasted to bare metal, phosphate etched, primed with self etching primer.


Tins glazed, sanded and sealed with DP-90 epoxy primer, I mocked up the front end to check for fit and alinement.



Thats the last pic before all hell broke loose.
The roof was leaking on my little 150 Sq ft shop for a while and since the rainy season would be soon upon us, it was time to to do some serious investigation and repairs. The leaking roof damage was done.......not to mention the hole I left as I fell in up to my arm pits with legs kicking.

To make a long story short. I had to replace half of the roof and 2 two of the walls from rot, with two walls open and a big hole in the roof it rained sideways off and on for two weeks totally destroying my cabinets and all that was left inside the shop and flooding all my parts bins and tools.

So after 4 months of working injured and alone, I added about 100 Sq Ft now I have about 250 Sq feet of work and storage space.

Now I am mostly moved back into the shop, most of the cuts scrapes and bruises are healed, there is still plenty of work left to do on siding, flooring and trim.

I have had time to do some work on the bikes, mostly cleaning the parts that spent a few days in a bins full of water.

The work on finishing the engine rebuild is close to an end. All parts except the SS bolts and hardware are in, FAG supperblend bearings Black diamond exhaust valves and the score of the project so far. Thanks to Mike Raber, A set of NOS Hap Jones, 10:1 +.20 pistons at 1/3 the cost of new repop pistons.


I have been looking for Akront or Excel shouldered rims for some time. Finding old stock Akronts is next to impossible and Buchanan's has been out of stock of the Excel WM3 19 rims for months. This morning I called and asked if they had an expected time of arrival for the Excel rims, Angel had no Idea on the ETA but thought that they had a WM3 19 for a Norton Drum that was never picked up in the back that had been there fore ever.

Rims and Spokes are on the way !!!!!!!!!! Thanks Angel!!!!!!!!
 
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Oct 10, 2010
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The clutch Cleaned up nicely but the Norton shop manual was a little hard to follow and the pictures sucked.


The exploded view in the parts manual was even wrong showing the clutch center shock-absorber installed backwards.



Thanks to a 60 year old Article " THE NORTON CLUTCHBy DEREK WYBORN " I found in pdf on line it went back together quite easily.



 

grandpaul

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Greg, that updated illustration is EXACTLY what I've been looking for.

...P.S. - no need to be brief on project updates!
 
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grandpaul said:
Greg, that updated illustration is EXACTLY what I've been looking for.

...P.S. - no need to be brief on project updates!
Paul, just google the article ( THE NORTON CLUTCHBy DEREK WYBORN) and download the PDF, its very nice for being so old but the pic is great in all it's simplicity. I had the clutch all together the first time, and then after seeing the illustration in the parts manual I took it all back down only to realize it was right to begin with.....ARGGGGG

Brief project up dates..... ha been mostly setbacks and re working stuff for the second time not to mention the price of the construction cutting way into project cash flow.
 

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