650 SS Dommi Racer build

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Feb 28, 2009
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Gday beng, that classic photo is a worthy post, mmm... nice looking ride that!
Foxy
 
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Webby03 said:
Looking good Caferider!
I agree, you need a good looking front drum on a cafe racer.
As for your wheels, I know a WM3 will fit between the front forks, but whist the rear will fit, do you think you will have room for the chain without it rubbing on the tire? (I'm asking because I'm getting near to ordering rims for my Triton)

Thanks

Webby

Webby,

The WM2 rim measures 1.85", WM3 2.15" and WM4 2.50" and from what I under stand is the WM4 will easily fit but it's the selection of tyre that could cause clearance issues. I spoke with Frank from Clubman Racing today about this very topic, and on their website it states" A typical 90/90 front and 110/90 rear need WM2 & WM3 rims as minimum, move up to 100/90 front and 120/80 rear and you need a WM3 & WM4. Remember these are not optimum rim sizes they are minimum recommended width."

Frank assured me that a WM4 would work, but with a 120/80 depending on tyre Manufacturer/selection ( they all are mot the same width in actuality ) it might rub and that I might have to modify the chain guard. He also stated that you should select a rim size that allows you a large selection of tyres, and to check the tyre specs for recommended and allowable rim widths.

I'm close to making a decision on the EXCEL WM4 x 18" Shouldered Rim for the rear, with the Avon Roadrider AM26 120/80-18, it has a rim width range of 2.50 - 3.00 is 4.70" wide and 25.7 tall and for the front, the EXCEL WM3 x 19" Shouldered Rim with the AM26 100/90-19, it has a rim width range of 2.15 - 2.75 is 4.3" wide and 26.4 tall.
 
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Gday All, yes Ive got to bite the bullet soon and buy rims etc for my bike. I rather like the Excel rim and the brand is seen on the lip in red, adds a bit of color. Below are pics showing dimensions for Akront,s others should be the same. Perhaps rim thickness may be different with other brands?




I would like the fatest tyre on the rear with out having to change swingarm. Any suggestions anyone?
Foxy
 
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Foxy said:
Gday beng, that classic photo is a worthy post, mmm... nice looking ride that!
Foxy
I just thought the bike was bitchin and threw it up, I have no information on the image. But by the location of the gas-cap on the tank and the style of headlight bucket it looks like a 1963 or earlier Dominator. I thought it was relevant to the thread. I will try to get more info on the image.

The guy on the Norton looks like he is enjoying his bike and the ride, seventh heaven........
 
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Jeandr said:
beng said:
Here is a real Domiracer you can use for ideas...
When will you understand the difference between a race bike and a road bike, doen't the word café racer have one part of it which means it it meant to look like a racer but not be a real one :?:

Man are you dense :!:

Jean
Are you trying to get BG to be rude to you?
 
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Triton Thrasher said:
Are you trying to get BG to be rude to you?
No, looking back, I am sorry I wrote that, but after trying to show him why some of us build bikes for fun, looks or personal satisfaction and he still comes back with the same "it aint good unless it looks like shit" or "real racers don't paint and polish their bikes" answers, I fell for the troll and gave him satisfaction, I'm sure he is very happy about me doubting his intellectual faculties so maybe after being told so many times, he will finally get an IQ test and have it black on white that there is a real problem right above his neckline. That being said, I would really like to see what HE has built, not what he has copied from the internet.

Jean
 
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Personally,
If I was building a race bike replica / facsimile / clone / etc.
I would welcome some pictures of a real race bike. In fact, the more - the better!

IMHO. There is no such thing as too much reference (inspirational) material.
 
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Mark said:
Personally,
If I was building a race bike replica / facsimile / clone / etc.
I would welcome some pictures of a real race bike. In fact, the more - the better!

IMHO. There is no such thing as too much reference (inspirational) material.
There are so many good looking pictures of bikes on the net but not many have the detail that I am looking for. I was looking for some details on head-steadies and found the perfect answer.



Then I found pics of Bruno Perlinskis Domi


 
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britbike220 said:
Greg, love the drum brake, go with 19's front and rear, you know you want to....... :wink:
I need to look into it and see how tall it is going to be. as it will be moving into the narrowest part of the swing arm.
 
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Caferider said:
Webby03 said:
Looking good Caferider!
I agree, you need a good looking front drum on a cafe racer.
As for your wheels, I know a WM3 will fit between the front forks, but whist the rear will fit, do you think you will have room for the chain without it rubbing on the tire? (I'm asking because I'm getting near to ordering rims for my Triton)

Thanks

Webby

Webby,

The WM2 rim measures 1.85", WM3 2.15" and WM4 2.50" and from what I under stand is the WM4 will easily fit but it's the selection of tyre that could cause clearance issues. I spoke with Frank from Clubman Racing today about this very topic, and on their website it states" A typical 90/90 front and 110/90 rear need WM2 & WM3 rims as minimum, move up to 100/90 front and 120/80 rear and you need a WM3 & WM4. Remember these are not optimum rim sizes they are minimum recommended width."

Frank assured me that a WM4 would work, but with a 120/80 depending on tyre Manufacturer/selection ( they all are mot the same width in actuality ) it might rub and that I might have to modify the chain guard. He also stated that you should select a rim size that allows you a large selection of tyres, and to check the tyre specs for recommended and allowable rim widths.

I'm close to making a decision on the EXCEL WM4 x 18" Shouldered Rim for the rear, with the Avon Roadrider AM26 120/80-18, it has a rim width range of 2.50 - 3.00 is 4.70" wide and 25.7 tall and for the front, the EXCEL WM3 x 19" Shouldered Rim with the AM26 100/90-19, it has a rim width range of 2.15 - 2.75 is 4.3" wide and 26.4 tall.
Hi Greg,
For more suitable tire sizes have a look at the chart here http://www.hagon-shocks.co.uk/WheelTab.htm
I think that going for the 18" rims is a good idea, it should allow for a much wider choice of tires.
You may get away with a 120 rear, but it could be tight, but you can still fit a 110 tire to a WM4 rim so I think your rim size decision is a good one :)

All the best

Webby
 
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Webby03 said:
Hi Greg,
For more suitable tire sizes have a look at the chart here http://www.hagon-shocks.co.uk/WheelTab.htm
I think that going for the 18" rims is a good idea, it should allow for a much wider choice of tires.
You may get away with a 120 rear, but it could be tight, but you can still fit a 110 tire to a WM4 rim so I think your rim size decision is a good one :)

All the best

Webby
Webby,

Here is a comparison of the Avon Tyres:

AM26 100/90-19, it has a rim width range of 2.15 - 2.75 is 4.3" wide and 26.4 tall (FRONT)
AM26 120/80-18, it has a rim width range of 2.50 - 3.00 is 4.70" wide and 25.7 tall (REAR)
AM26 120/90-18, it has a rim width range of 2.50 - 3.00 is 5.10" wide and 26.6 tall (REAR)
AM26 110/90-18, it has a rim width range of 2.15 - 3.00 is 4.6" wide and 26.1 tall (REAR)

Actually the 110/90 is taller and 0.10" narrower than the 120/80 but I want to get as wide a tyre in there as I can, but its good to know if I need to get a hair more clearance I can just step down to the 110/90
 
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That a mighty fine looking head steady on Brunos Domi. I made one for my project out of steel, its not finished yet as the boyer Micro power may be bolted on it. I say maybe as Tri-Spark now make em for Dukes etc and will work with my 90 dgree offset, so I may go that way yet? heres some pics so far as to what it looks like. I must add that its arc welded then destressed/normalised by heating it up till a nice red color then let cool.


 
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Mark said:
Personally,
If I was building a race bike replica / facsimile / clone / etc.
I would welcome some pictures of a real race bike. In fact, the more - the better!

IMHO. There is no such thing as too much reference (inspirational) material.
Take a look here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=252051 tons of pictures of any kind of café racer including a huge number of Nortons. Plenty of inspiration, sometimes even on other bikes, you can get a good idea of paint schemes, exhausts, rear-sets...

Jean
 
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Foxy, that is a great head steady. Steel is twice as stiff as aluminum, and has a lower expansion rate.

The late Manx Nortons have a neat steel head-steady that is adjustable, you put it in then you can tighten it up so it is in a bit of tension, you can see how that would help pre-load the chassis and stabilize it a bit.

Alloy engine plates and mounts are easy to make because the material is so workable, but they have to be twice as thick as steel plates to get it's stiffness, and when you do that they weigh almost the same as steel.

Because they expand so much when hot the primary chain has to be run looser initially, and they can even push the frame of the bike out of shape.

The old race-bike I threw up a photo of came with steel plates from the works, was tried with alloy plates by it's long-time tuner, then it was switched back to steel because they worked better in every way.

I used to think titanium would be a great material for engine plates and mounts, but then I found out it is way less stiff than steel and heavier than aluminum, not worth it's cost in that application anyway.

Modern sport bikes use a lot of aluminum, but the frames and parts are designed from scratch to use the material and account for it's properties. When you start to plug different materials into a set design you might like the looks of it, but you there is every chance you have traded away something unseen.
 
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beng said:
Foxy, that is a great head steady. Steel is twice as stiff as aluminum, and has a lower expansion rate.

The late Manx Nortons have a neat steel head-steady that is adjustable, you put it in then you can tighten it up so it is in a bit of tension, you can see how that would help pre-load the chassis and stabilize it a bit.
Ben do you have a pic of one ?

I have been thinking of doing something similar with Adjustable rod ends, and after seeing Jeans latest additions it just makes me want to do it even more http://www.accessnorton.com/cafe-commando-build-thread-t8372-135.html
 
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I got the rose joints on e-bay from a guy in the UK (mcgillmotorsports). You can get the same and better (stainless steel) from McMaster-Carr and they also have the connecting links in many different lenghts.

Jean
 

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