1971 Moto Guzzi Nuovo Falcone

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Heres someone with ' nuovo Falcones ' on the brain . Says 20 kw @ 4.800 on a 29 mm carb . Obviously needs a 40 mm . :D

http://www.moturist.nl/nf_pics/index.html

Was a test of one in Aus. ' Two Wheels ' mag. , made the cover even . thought they said 80 mph . or was it 90 downhill ?

55er



71er





All the Bits fall off , if you dont keep the Bolts Tight . And this is what youre left with . 8)

 
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192cc and 7.5 bhp ???
Couldn't you have found some specs for a smaller engine Matt ???

This is a 53 racer, a 350 dohc.
Long way from a roadbike....
(Glimpse of an almost porcupine-like creature behind that fairing ? Single cylinder though, of course)
They should have painted teeth on that probiscus - or nostrils ?



Note the image mentions twin - another website that doesn't know guzzis.

And an earlier version - photoed in its day - in MG green.


And Fergus Anderson in the Ulster GP in 1953.
He won the 350cc World Championship series of races on these bikes in 1953 and 1954.
(it was updated and developed along the way, this is the sohc version.)(it soon became a dohc version, to suit some circuits).

 
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There are those , intrested in the tecnological comparison ; the Ancestry ; the shared inovations ; design similarities . And , IF any parts interchange .
To soup it up , increase the efficency , and reduce the production compromises .

The n there Gileras . :D
 
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A slow slow-revving ohv plodder and a hi-revving race dohc world champeeeen already don't have much in common ??!
And where does Gilera possibly come into this discussion ???

Then you could take a guzzi twin, and slot it into a sorta featherbed. ?
Not sure that would rate as an unqualified success ??!

 
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I was at our local easter Broadford Bonanza yesterday and saw an early falcone. It was what was raced prior to the fifties. I've seen the later model 350 at Phillip Island a few years ago, it was a much more developed bike. In the early days w hat was raced was pretty much the road bike. Fergus Anderson brought the later Guzzi to Australia in the fifties, and was extremely fast. You could not hope to build t hat unless you got hold of the original and copied it from the ground up.
 
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Rohan, I think what we tend to forget is that during the thirties and up until the fifties, the racing bikes did not change much. They factories did not have the ability to change models easily. The Norton racers stayed pretty much the same for about twenty years. If you look at what the italians raced back then, most of it was very close to their r oad bikes. I remember that in the fifties we did not know what we were looking at. My mate bought a 250 Parilla production racer from his employer. Only one was ewver imported because there was no market for them. Why would you buy a genuine 250cc Italian racer hen you could buy a Triumph Thunderbird for the same money ? I look back on those days now and think about how bloody stupid we all were. Racing a fourstroke single cylinder bike against thirty others on the same type of bike could be the ultimate adrenalin rush. Moto3 is an opportunity, however I think it w ill fall in a hole.
 
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acotrel said:
If you look at what the italians raced back then, most of it was very close to their r oad bikes. .
You keep saying that. But when you look at the Guzzi racers, they are almost NOTHING like the road bikes. Wide angle 120 degree twins, and dohc laydown bevel drive singles, and quite sophisticated variable damping, front and rear = about as much in common with their road bikes as a manx is to an ES2. (about nothing !!)
And thats not counting the 3 and 4 cylinder supercharged thingies that Guzzi tried in the 30s...

Guzzi won their 1st IoM TT with this beastie - with Stanley Woods was it ? Ever see a roadbike like this (modern Ducatis excluded ?)
Note the lever thingy under the tank there - thats a cable operated adjustment for the variable damping.

 
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The bike in your photo is a 500, have a look at a 350. Then have a look at the type of bike that Nuvolari rode when he was on motorcycles .

This is the DOHC 1956 model :
http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/ ... t_1956.htm

1957 350 GP
http://www.philaphoto.com/imageLibrary/ ... album=1165

The 1950 model:
http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/v ... =altavista

And this one:

http://classic-motorbikes.net/images/gallery/10376.jpg


The falcone is a lot closer to a factory racer than an ES2 is to a Manx

http://motorbike-search-engine.co.uk/cl ... dolino.jpg
 
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It would be a great sort of frame for a 125cc lay down type Chinese pit bike motor
 
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I've got a bit of a thing about car racing drivers who tr y to race motorcycles. I've never seen ome who was any good. Tazio Nuvolari started on bikes, as did Kurt Rosemeyer, John Surtees, Mike Hailwood, Gregg Hansford, Wayne Gardner. All were very successful. I think doing the reverse is impossible. When I was a kid I watched a lot of the old thirties and forties racing movies . Nuvolari was the best. Rosemeyer wa s the only driver to succeed in mastering the rear engined Auto Union. John Surtess is the only person to have won both bike and car world championships.
 
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acotrel said:
This would be easy to make :
About as easy as a Manx.
About the same number of parts.
About the same technology.
About the same materials - all magnesium and hitensile steel and bevel gears.

And, surprise surprise, they beat the Manxes in GP racing with something similar in 1953 and 1954, when Guzzi with Fergus Anderson as rider won the 350cc World Championship, 2 years running....
 
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I suggest making the cam box and head for a double knocker manx would be much more difficult than the head for the Guzzi. The Guzzi head looks like a much smarter design. I believe the Italians were always superior in casting technology. I had an MV125 road bike a while back, what was inside the timing chest was very nice. The strengthening ribs were all in the right places . It is about 'value analysis'. The British don't seem to cut the weight of their castings to the bare essentials.
 
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A 350cc Aermacchi Ala D Oro is a good thing, and easier to get bits for than any Guzzi.
 
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acotrel said:
Rohan, compare the Moto Guzzi Airone with the 1950 racer :
http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/i ... zzi+airone
In what respect ?

The 250cc Airone ran from 1940, as a military model, to 1957.
It is listed in 1952 as having 9.5hp, and top speed of 92 km/hr.
The earlier versions had an iron head and iron cylinder.
At least the early 500cc Falcones could do nearly 70 mph, and had an all alloy motor.
(AS did/could the last of the 1970s Falcones).
Not magnesium, like the racers, nor sohc nor dohc, like the racers...

Compare a ohv Norton ES2, featherbed version, to a dohc Manx racer.
Not one component the same, apart from the air in the tires ??
They do have a wheel at each end, and a seat on top, and an engine in the middle.
Are we going to say they look the same ???

Unless you have a good book on Guzzis, or an encyclopaedic knowledge of them, all flat single Guzzi's 'look alike'.
But then so do all dogs, unless you know your schnitzers from your schnauzers...
 
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