Torquing crank pulley

Joined
Dec 19, 2004
Messages
413
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Greetings All,
In the past when I have installed the crank sprocket I found that a lenght of flat stock placed between a row of sprocket teeth and the primary case mounting stud was all I needed to be able to torque the cranknut to spec.
With the installation of my new primary belt drive I was alittle reluctant to try the same method, as the pulley has much smaller teeth and being aluminum, is softer.
What I ended up doing is using alittle loctite on the nut along with the new lock washer provided with the kit, and then gave it 3 or 4 shots with a 1/2 inch electric impact.
I'm not too worried about it, but, was wondering if and how any others have dealt with this situation?
justa thought,
geo46er
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2004
Messages
327
Are you refering to the nut on the end of the main shaft where the alternator rotor bolts onto...

Take a look at the pic on this page of my site http://www.nortonfastback.com/html/rebuild_1.html. that is how I handled it. Otherwise all the manuals say " put the bike in gear and apply the rear brake".

Hope that helps.

fstbk
 

Anonymous

Guest
Hello Fastback,
Thanks for the picture of your setup. I figuered somebody had to have come up with some sort of tool. Unfortunately, I don't have any spare clutch plates laying around with which to make one.
But that's ok, last night I remembered an old snowmobile trick that should work just fine. I'll roll the drive side cylinder past TDC compression and down on the powerstroke. Then I'll stuff the cylinder with a nylon cord/clothesline rope through the spark plug hole. When I tighten the nut it should lock the crank up, tighten to torque spec, backoff pull rope out.
My simple belt drive installation has snowballed into a front sprocket, stator wire repair, mainshaft straightening, layshaft roller bearing, trans cover lipseal---upgrade. Oh well, won't be nice around here (New England) till April/May, plenty of time for projects.

justa thought,
geo46er
 

Anonymous

Guest
geo46er,

A make-shift but effective anti-rotation device can be made by wadding up a shop towel and stuffing it between the sprocket and primary chain.

Jason
 
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