Rear wheel bearings removal (2006)

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Hello: It seems that i'm not able to change the rear wheel bearings... How do they come off?
What about the break bearing?
Should there be any clearance in the break drum felts and bearings?

Thanks for your help!
 

ILLF8ED

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rear wheel bearings

The only odd thing about the rear hub is the speedometer drive has left hand threads. It holds the bearings in from the right side. The brake drum bearing is held in place by a snap ring. Felts are kept away from the bearing with a washer on each side. Don't forget the washer-spacer(06-7603) inside the drum that goes on the dummy axle (I did this). You get considerable rubbing of the brake backplate on the brake drum without it.
 

L.A.B.

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Sparkplug,

Workshop manuals (Haynes and Clymer) give the following info which I hope is correct (as I have a MkIII the procedure is different). I'm sure if there is an easier way then somebody will say what it is? :

Wheel hub bearings

Unscrew lock ring (LEFT hand thread-either use Norton tool or make one).

Remove felt washer and spacer.

Replace the thick axle (spindle) washer and right hand side spacer onto the axle.

Insert the axle into the bearing on the left hand side of the hub.

Then by tapping on the end of the axle, drive the bearing into the hub as far as it will go the R/H bearing should start to move.

Remove the rear wheel axle and fit the front wheel axle threaded end first, in its place.

Keep the axle horizontal (if the wheel is vertical I suppose?) and tap the end until the R/H bearing and spacer are removed.

Insert rear axle with spacer into L/H bearing from the right hand side of the hub, then drive out the bearing.

Brake drum bearing

Remove drum from the brake assembly.

Remove spacer, washers and circlip from R/H side.

Screw the axle nut onto the short axle then drive out the bearing by tapping on the axle/nut.




Perhaps you should think about getting a manual if you do not have one?
 
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Hi, guys:
Thanks for your help!

L.A.B.: I have a Haynes manual (altough it's really hard to read to me not just because of the language, but because it has many tecnical words I never learnt) I tried to unscrew the lock ring and it seemed to me that I could break it as it was really tight... The bearings came out using a hammer... again I thought I was doing something wrong, but they finally came out too.

The break drum bearing seems a little "roomy" as it has a clearance that i believe not to be normal. I'll replace it anyway.

The bearings that I've bought are different from the originals: They're closed and I don't know if I should grease them or not... are this kind ok for the wheels?

Thanks again!! :wink:
 

L.A.B.

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sparkplug said:
The bearings that I've bought are different from the originals: They're closed and I don't know if I should grease them or not... are this kind ok for the wheels?

If by "closed" you mean they have two rubber seals normally coded as *2RS* then they should be better than the originals and are already greased, which the seals should keep in, and also keep water and dirt out.

Some bearings have metal shields and are OK but will not keep dirt or water out as well as the 2RS.

Any technical words you do not understand then you only need to ask here or use PM or email. Although British/Australians can use some different tech terms (and spelling) to Americans, so you could get two different answers to the same question!
 
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Just a couple of thoughts.

Warming the hub makes removal of the bearings a lot easier and I would consider essential for replacement. I use a kettle of boiling water and that is enough to expand the aluminium. Water and bearings sounds like a bad idea but it evaporates almost instantly.

Sealed bearings don't contain much grease but I don't think that the outer seal is a bad idea. I would remove the inner seal and pack the hub as per the book.

I assume that you have got a double-row bearing for the drum ?

The old Haynes manual is one of their earlier efforts and I would hesitate to rely on it alone. The genuine factory manual is widely available or regularly turns up on ebay. It has nice clear line drawings showing asembly order etc. Mine is far grubbier than my Haynes so that probably says it all.
 

L.A.B.

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To be fair it has to be said that the Haynes (and Clymer) manuals have to cover all models unlike the factory ones that are more model specific.

Used factory manuals certainly do turn up on eBay,-normally with a starting price twice that of a new one!!
 
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I don't have a problem with Haynes as such and their newer productions are a great improvement. My Commando copy though suffers from really poor 1970s photo reproduction and they used a really dirty bike. It's like looking at a black cat in a coal-hole.

It is the factory manual as well that tells us that the rear wheel bearing retainer on the Mk111 is a L/H thread isn't it ? I destroyed my first one thanks to that :)

Hadn't really looked at ebay prices. No reason not to get a new one then and keep them in print !

By the way, posted simultaneously with your previous post. Didn't mean to disagree over the sealed bearings aspect. Do you think they're Ok to use "as is" ? It just seemed to me that the small quantity of grease was going to get quite hot and overworked in that situation. What do modern bikes have ?
 
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Having had a lot to do with bearings over the years in lots of different applications the best results seem to come from buying bearings that are sealed on one side only and packing them manually or alternatively, you can remove the seal from one side and top up the grease that's in it, there is no need to try to reseal the open side of the bearing just have it towards the centre of the hub.
Mike.
 
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I second Mikes take on this. I have never been impressed with the lube found in a pre packed bearing. Old and dry best discribes it.
 

L.A.B.

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I can't see any real problem using the sealed (2RS) bearings?

As this type of wheel bearing seems to be fitted as original equipment on many modern motorcycles (and they have been for some time), so if there were any reliability issues then they would be known about by now?

If 'wheel bearings' are ordered from a supplier (at least in the UK) then the 2RS is generally the type supplied.

The majority of worn out wheel bearings I have found that were in need of replacement was mostly due to water having got into the bearing rather than due to any lack of lubrication.
 
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Bearings with seals both sides are not dated clearly. The manufactor may know by the lot date just try to pry that info. loose. All I am saying is that every time I have checked I have repacked the bearing. I work on old cars and have seen what dry grease can do. It's alot like sand and spit. I use them in wheels like you I just don't trust them. If your carful the seal will press right on again.
 
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All i'm saying is for best results it is a better option to pack your own bearings with an optimum high quality grease, i'm not saying that your bearings will fail they probably wont, but if you feel inclined, for your peace of mind, you can pack your own.
My company currently has a contract to assemble 20,120 pulleys, which includes 40,240 bearings, 80,480 circlips, 20,120 shafts and so on, our customer requires that each bearing has to be packed manually with 9 grams of premium grease ($20 OZ a kilogramme) and the hubs with 35 grams of the same, and the bearings externally sealed only, and these pulleys only do 300 r.p.m.
Mike.
 
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mike mcmanus said:
and these pulleys only do 300 r.p.m.
Mike.

Bet they're used on more than just the odd sunny Sunday though !

I am staggered by the prices of some of the industrial Kluber and Optimol greases we use at work but I have seen the test rig results and all greases are not alike.

I am inclined to agree that I like to be able to see a well packed bearing. My 16H has grease nipples on the hubs, but I suppose they were deleted in the name of progress. Maybe Nortons thought that the punters would pump them full of EP140 :)
 
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It is amazing, i have 1225kg. of Mobilith SHC grease at approx. $20/kg. sitting on my workshop floor under armed guard :D , no not really armed guard, but it is still alot of money.
Mike.
 
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greasing bearings

I read with interest the comments on packing sealed bearings with grease.
As a maintenance electrician changing bearings on various sizes of motors. We found too much grease can be as harmful as not enough grease. The grease aids in smooth running and heat dissipation. Too much grease will cause overheating and seals to pop. The Grease then getting in all the wrong places. Granted these motors are 1450 rpm & over.
I always reckon a little is better than too much and if its not broken don't touch it. I think i greased my front hub once many years ago. Probably needs lookin at soon , but its still running smoothly.
 
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Is it possible to remove that rear brake drum felt seal retaining washer without damaging it beyond repair? :?:
 
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Re: greasing bearings

dgwilson said:
I read with interest the comments on packing sealed bearings with grease.
As a maintenance electrician changing bearings on various sizes of motors. We found too much grease can be as harmful as not enough grease. The grease aids in smooth running and heat dissipation. Too much grease will cause overheating and seals to pop. The Grease then getting in all the wrong places. Granted these motors are 1450 rpm & over.
I always reckon a little is better than too much and if its not broken don't touch it. I think i greased my front hub once many years ago. Probably needs lookin at soon , but its still running smoothly.
I've heard the same thing but I never had any issues...
 

MCP

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Removing bearings - I'm stuck. I've read many threads on this including the advice below but I want to be sure before I take heat and a hammer to get the job done. I don't see a a circlip mentioned below. 1974 850

This is what I'm looking at. Is that a dished washer in this pict and if so, does that just pop out by prying? Circlip under that?


Rear wheel bearings removal (2006)


Is this just a matter of heating and knocking them out.
Rear wheel bearings removal (2006)


Rear wheel bearings removal (2006)


Sparkplug,

Workshop manuals (Haynes and Clymer) give the following info which I hope is correct (as I have a MkIII the procedure is different). I'm sure if there is an easier way then somebody will say what it is? :

Wheel hub bearings

Unscrew lock ring (LEFT hand thread-either use Norton tool or make one).

Remove felt washer and spacer.

Replace the thick axle (spindle) washer and right hand side spacer onto the axle.

Insert the axle into the bearing on the left hand side of the hub.

Then by tapping on the end of the axle, drive the bearing into the hub as far as it will go the R/H bearing should start to move.

Remove the rear wheel axle and fit the front wheel axle threaded end first, in its place.

Keep the axle horizontal (if the wheel is vertical I suppose?) and tap the end until the R/H bearing and spacer are removed.

Insert rear axle with spacer into L/H bearing from the right hand side of the hub, then drive out the bearing.

Brake drum bearing

Remove drum from the brake assembly.

Remove spacer, washers and circlip from R/H side.

Screw the axle nut onto the short axle then drive out the bearing by tapping on the axle/nut.




Perhaps you should think about getting a manual if you do not have one?
 

L.A.B.

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Removing bearings - I'm stuck. I've read many threads on this including the advice below but I want to be sure before I take heat and a hammer to get the job done.


I don't see a a circlip. This is what I'm looking at. Is that a dished washer in this pict and if so, does that just pop out by prying? Circlip under that? mentioned below. 1974 850


http://www.classicbike.biz/Norton/Repair/70up_Commando/70upCommando.pdf
Sections H4 & H5.

https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-drawing/197/rear-wheel-drum-bearings

To get to the circlip (47) first you must remove the shouldered bearing spacer (23), dished washer (32), felt washer (33) felt retaining washer(30) as stated in section H5, 1971 and later models, 2 - 4.



Is this just a matter of heating and knocking them out.

Rear hub.
Follow the instructions in the manual, section H4.

The procedure for refitting the bearings in H5 must be followed as the RH bearing must be fitted and the lock ring fully tightened first before fitting the bearing spacer and LH bearing and be sure to refit the spacer with the short shouldered end on the drum side ('71 on hub).
 
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