Paint or powder coat?

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What’s your preference?

When I get deeper into my resto of the Triton the frame is going to need a serious couple of coats of looking at. I will first of all get it blasted so I can check it for cracks or damage. Then I’ll need to cover the bare metal.

Nope, I’m not going to get it nickel plated before it’s suggested. I can either get my bruv-in-law to dust off his spray painting gear now he’s retired from a lifetime of it, then ask him to do it in 2 pack. Or take it along to the local powdercoaters. I know our Commando frames need a bit of careful preparation, but the featherbed frame seems to need less.

What do you reckon?
 
Powder is super tough, and cheaper (usually).

Downsides: it’s usually not as glossy as stove enamel or similar.

Main downsides: many powder coaters are industrial people, they lather it on way too thick, this causes some genuine issues with fitment. Also when the powder crushes over time, all your fasteners will become loose!

There are those who have skilled powder coaters that do a great job and avoid the above issues. But unless you know them, the only way to find out is by using them…
 
What FE said.
If your brother in law has a lifetime of painting experience and you guys are pals, well, the answer seems kind of obvious to me. You can lean on him for knowledge, paint selection and his expertise in looking out for the quality of your paint job. The guys that have a lifetime of been there done that know what details/issues come in to play and how to take care of them.
And, if he F@#$s up you can always send his sister after him.
 
Powder is super tough, and cheaper (usually).

Downsides: it’s usually not as glossy as stove enamel or similar.

Main downsides: many powder coaters are industrial people, they lather it on way too thick, this causes some genuine issues with fitment. Also when the powder crushes over time, all your fasteners will become loose!

There are those who have skilled powder coaters that do a great job and avoid the above issues. But unless you know them, the only way to find out is by using them…
Agree! I like powder coated frames but I insist on no prime coat and no clear coat. One coat of 85%-90% gloss is a good match for the original paint. 95% is too glossy.

I do not powder coat cradles. Everything but the frame, swingarm, and cradle I powder coat myself. Way faster, easier, and cheaper than painting once you are setup to do it. I built a wooden cabinet with filter, light, electrified hanging rails, and suction. My oven sits on top of it so it takes very little space and powder doesn't go everywhere. My cabinet doubles as a paint booth for painting cradles and barrels.
 
I've been sold on PROPERLY PREPPED and applied Powdercoat since the late 90s. All of my projects were carefully specified as to the "Old Britts" masking pattern, and direct application on properly stripped frame with no clearcoat.

I've never had a report of chipping on well over 100 bikes in 25+ years.

When I've had occasion to have to touch up a small area that got ground clean to weld on tabs (my monoshock bikes, and add-on kickstand mount on my Triton), Rust-O-Leum rattle can gloss black was all that was required to make it disappear.

Yessir, I'm COMPLETELY sold.
 
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