LIFTING USING FRAME

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I've been looking at a bike lift so I can work at a standing height, instead of crawling around on my knee's. www.bikelift.com
Are the Norton Mk11a frame tubes under the engine strong enough to use as lifting points?.
This type of lifter uses 'U' clamps to bolt the bike's frame onto the lifting arm.
Another method would be to lift using the footpeg brackets.
My understanding is that the Nortons frame is not strong enough for sidecar use and therefore I dont want to risk bending the frame by using his lift
 
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No experience with those products....but I wouldn't put my bike up on something as off the wall as what is pictured on their webpage...let alone sit my kid on it.... ;-)

Look into a real lift, that you drive/push the bike up on to....is a better solution....
 

L.A.B.

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I don't see any problem whatsoever lifting the bike by the lower frame rails, which would certainly seem preferable to lifting it by the footrest brackets!
And in any case, the factory recommended that the weight of the bike be supported on the lower frame rails during Isolastic adjustment (1971-on models).
 
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The front wheel "Bike Grab" looks nifty. Anything like that available in N America? I would be into buying one if I could find something similar at a good price..
 
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bike lift

I reckon I could knock one of these together for $100-$150 australian.
I better make sure my welding is up to scratch!!
 
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dgwilson said:
I've been looking at a bike lift so I can work at a standing height, instead of crawling around on my knee's. www.bikelift.com
Are the Norton Mk11a frame tubes under the engine strong enough to use as lifting points?.
This type of lifter uses 'U' clamps to bolt the bike's frame onto the lifting arm.
Another method would be to lift using the footpeg brackets.
My understanding is that the Nortons frame is not strong enough for sidecar use and therefore I dont want to risk bending the frame by using his lift

I bought a Craftsman lift that is pretty solid and isn't terribly expensive. About 150 bucks. Has rubber feet that sit under the Commando frame nicely. No problem lifting a Commando this way. These types of jacks don't really lift the bike up to standing height though. Only about a 2 foot lift maximum but it does make working on the bike a lot easier and I have found mine to be quite secure.

If you want to work at standing height, you need a pneumatic table with a lock for the front wheel. These are great bacause you can drive right on, hold the bike up very securely at any height and you also have a place to put your tools. Will cost you about 1000 bucks though!

Not sure if you have access to Craftsman tools in Australia but here's the link to the jack I have:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product. ... Cookie=Yes
 

Ron L

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I use the Handy Industries lift for most work (http://www.handyindustries.com/). But the simple lift like the Sears or other frame lift works well for removing wheels, etc. Lifting by the frame does no harm, but be certain the bike is balanced and can's slip off the lifting pad. Also use a tie-down to keep it from tipping, especially when removing wheels.
A sling from the garage rafters with a chain hoist or cable come-along works well also. Loop a soft tie strap around the frame with the tank and seat removed.
A friend picked up one of these wheel chock devices but I he hasn't had it long enough to evaluate.
 
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I use a hydraulic lift I got on sale locally. It didn't fit the Norton well so I made a cradle out of angle iron that supports the lower frame rails nicely. The only trick is to balance it properly. If you take one wheel off but not the other it gets heavy at one end. Still, it works well. In fact, next season I'm going to ditch my centerstand because it's not that useful. With a 110x18 rear tire and MK3 wheel, it's impossible to get the rear wheel off the bike on the centerstand so the lift is a necessity. It will also make a dandy automotive transmission jack next time I need one.
 

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dwardo said:
In fact, next season I'm going to ditch my centerstand because it's not that useful. With a 110x18 rear tire and MK3 wheel, it's impossible to get the rear wheel off the bike on the centerstand so the lift is a necessity.

It isn't particularly difficult to remove the rear wheel from a Commando using the standard main stand.
After removing everything necessary to drop the wheel, stand on the left side of the bike, the steering is then turned all the way to the left (and it can help if the front brake lever is tied so that the brake is on) the bike (still on the stand) is then pulled over to the left to about a 20-30 degree angle, with the left hand holding the handlebars and the bike supported against the legs, reach down with the right hand and roll/lift the rear wheel out of position.
The bike can then be stood upright again. Reverse the procedure to refit, which can be a little bit more difficult but can be just a matter of practice. Another 'pair of hands' can be useful, but aren't totally necessary.
 
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That might work. I never tried it. When my bike was a standard MK2 it was easy to get the wheel off but not now. I don't care really -- I'm way past the age where I want to repair a tube-type tire on the roadside. I'd actually just like to get rid of the center stand anyway.
 

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dwardo said:
That might work. I never tried it.

I know it works!

It is also the wheel removal method given in the 850 MkIII factory workshop manual.

And you don't need to be particularly strong. And isn't necessarily a procedure to use just for emergencies.

Whats wrong with mending punctures by the roadside? As a tube can be patched and anyone could be on their way again in the time it could take for the recovery service to arrive.
 
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Bike Lifts

I tried the various bike lifts, jacks etc and a few years finally broke down and purchased a table type lift. Think the brand is "Pro Lift"?? Bought it out of Dallas/Ft Worth and paid around $500.00. Honestly the best money I ever spent!! I use it for everything, bikes, changing tires, lawn mowers or just sitting around it in the shop with friends. Runs off my air compressor and think it goes up around 33" which is just right for standing or can lower it to sit beside it. With the front tire locked in, I put a little scissor jack underneath the bike if I need to get the rear or front wheels up for changing, cleaning etc. Might want to look into it, you wont be sorry. JMHO Semper fi devildog
 
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Harbor Freight

While I would buy a USA made one if I was working on bikes a lot, for the home user, the "offshore" one from Harbor Freight looks like it would do fine. They have a manually pumped one for under $300 and a pneumatic one for only $380. Plus if you are on their email list, you get 15% discount coupons all the time. I've looked at one in the store and plan to get one when I have the floor space. There is a good review on their web site which seems to be from an outside group.

http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/w ... motorcycle
 

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I have looked at the Harbor Freight model also. I believe it would work fine for a Norton and anything lighter. I am skeptical of their claimed 1000# limit. Working on my Ducatis and BMW's or a Harley I'd feel much better with my Handy Industries lift.
 
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More on Bike Lifts

I agree with Michael, I am not sure if it really makes much difference in the brand for a person working only on his bikes. If I had a shop I would get a top of the line one. My only point is that a pneumatic lift is so much easier. I have two parts of the back of the lift that I can remove which really makes removing tires or walking around bike easier. I have a number of bikes that I own and I always keep everything in the best of shape to include my lawnmowers, go karts etc so the lift is very worthwhile. I am sure they have the same great quality of lifts in the UK, NZ or Australia as well. I had the foot pump, small under the frame lifts and this table lift is a difference between day and night. Enjoy the holidays all. semper fi devildog
 
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I use a converted Wheelchair lift, just press a botton and lifts up to 4ft, more if I had the headroom.
 
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tpeever said:
dgwilson said:
I've been looking at a bike lift so I can work at a standing height, instead of crawling around on my knee's. www.bikelift.com
Are the Norton Mk11a frame tubes under the engine strong enough to use as lifting points?.
This type of lifter uses 'U' clamps to bolt the bike's frame onto the lifting arm.
Another method would be to lift using the footpeg brackets.
My understanding is that the Nortons frame is not strong enough for sidecar use and therefore I dont want to risk bending the frame by using his lift

I bought a Craftsman lift that is pretty solid and isn't terribly expensive. About 150 bucks. Has rubber feet that sit under the Commando frame nicely. No problem lifting a Commando this way. These types of jacks don't really lift the bike up to standing height though. Only about a 2 foot lift maximum but it does make working on the bike a lot easier and I have found mine to be quite secure.

If you want to work at standing height, you need a pneumatic table with a lock for the front wheel. These are great bacause you can drive right on, hold the bike up very securely at any height and you also have a place to put your tools. Will cost you about 1000 bucks though!

Not sure if you have access to Craftsman tools in Australia but here's the link to the jack I have:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product. ... Cookie=Yes


Here is the Canadian Craftsmen version. I think the version you fellas in the USA is a bit better. Maybe the same but different?

http://www.sears.ca/gp/product/B000FJGA ... d=15858301
 
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