Frankenbike

Fast Eddie

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Because maintaining originality is a prime consideration for many people, EVER IF NOBODY WILL EVER NOTICE!

There are names and euphemisms for personality types that relate to certain Norton owners who manifest these considerations...
Fairy Nuff.

To each his own eh ?
 

Richard Tool

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Yes Gents , we all have different values . Some even like motorcycles other than Nortons if you can imagine that ...;)
 

Lineslinger

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Fairy Nuff.

To each his own eh ?
My 932 renovation started off slowly, first floats gaskets etc. basic rebuild. Not running right.
Then needles and jets, still not running right.
Then another new set of new and improved floats and needles, mild improvement but still not right.
Floats properly leveled, it’s important.
New O rings on the air screws, a hidden gremlin that was a tough bit of analysis.
Moved on to new slides, slight improvement. Still not right.
At this point I am all in on restoring the originals, too much time/money invested to walk away.
Added Madass sync block, better still, but not right.

I then sent them off and had them sleeved.

Now they are right.

Duh, for all practical purposes they are new.

Investment approx. the same as new set.

The value of what I learned in understanding Amal’s via the above mentioned process?

Huge. I wouldn’t trade it for a new set...or did I just do exactly that...in a more valued way to me anyway.

If I knew then what I know now?

Seems that’s a question I have asked myself more than once.
 

Fast Eddie

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Sleeving works for sure, I’ve had it done in the last too, when there wasn’t much option.

But...

One of the weakness of these carbs is the body distorting when over tightened. Boring out the body makes the wall thickness thinner. Thus making them more prone to this.

And unless you machine out the pilot bushing and modify it, you still have the weakness of a possible partially blocked pilot in future.

So, all I’m saying is that on balance, for a bike to ride (as applied to collect ‘conkers’ points) new Premiers are generally a better bet IMHO.
 

Lineslinger

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Eddie, if I had known what a complete PITA those carbs were going to be I would have purchased a new set in a heartbeat.

I'm just noting that's how one path to repair and insight evolved.
I have crawled inside of SU,s Webers, Holley's, Strombergs etc. But never did I heave a carb in the recycle bin and buy a new one.
In hindsight, regarding these Amals, I would have done just that.

I have a reasonable confidence in Amal analysis now, but I took the hard road to get there.
 
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Scary ain't it?... After all of the time invested in learning how to interpret exactly what the hell is going on in how they do what they do and why they do it or don't do it I'll always have Amals on my Commando. It appears to be a perfect match for plenty of head scratching at inopportune times. Besides my ragged pair just won't wear out it seems.
 
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My 932 renovation started off slowly, first floats gaskets etc. basic rebuild. Not running right.
Then needles and jets, still not running right.
Then another new set of new and improved floats and needles, mild improvement but still not right.
Floats properly leveled, it’s important.
New O rings on the air screws, a hidden gremlin that was a tough bit of analysis.
Moved on to new slides, slight improvement. Still not right.
At this point I am all in on restoring the originals, too much time/money invested to walk away.
Added Madass sync block, better still, but not right.

I then sent them off and had them sleeved.

Now they are right.

Duh, for all practical purposes they are new.

Investment approx. the same as new set.

The value of what I learned in understanding Amal’s via the above mentioned process?

Huge. I wouldn’t trade it for a new set...or did I just do exactly that...in a more valued way to me anyway.

If I knew then what I know now?

Seems that’s a question I have asked myself more than once.
Thanks for the perspective and it is a lesson learned. It may be cheaper in the long run to buy new
 
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That’s correct Eddie and I appreciate all of the advice.

I’ll see how they run when I get the motor done. That probably won’t be for a while.

Here’s a question. I now have the rear brake complete and it works. If you look at this picture, the cable doesn’t seem to sit well in the mount on the frame. Is that normal? I assume that when it’s a running bike and the brake is adjusted properly it will settle in, Is that right?


find atm around me
I've found that when you don't put a bolt and spacer at the point where the chain oiler mounted, the chainguard can "tweek/twist" when you button things up. The chain will catch the guard at about one o'clock, or just above where the brake lever mounts. I learned twice the hard way in the course of 46 years.
 
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