decisions, decisions

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had the misfortune if you will of visiting the local triumph/ducati dealer yesterday. i've a well running '72, non combat that i'm upgrading and rebuilding as i ride it. in the basement is a 2a in pieces that i'm rebuilding/assembling in slow motion. i figured the '72 to be the fast norton for local riding and all around testbed for new stuff. the 2a i'm planning to tour with and reliability and comfort will be focused on. now i saw the damned triumph scrambler and i'm panting. if i got the scrambler the '72 would have to go or my parts slush fund would have to go stalling the 2a for the forseeable future. i kind of hate myself for entertaining the idea of ditching the old bike w/ it's uncertainties for the new bike which promises carefree and troublefree riding. i think i'll stick w/ the old bikes and stay the hell outta the new bike showrooms. hmmmm..... wonder how long it'd take wifey to miss her china and silver. just kidding. merry christmas everybody
 

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LOL LOL LOL :lol: I had the same problem a few weeks ago and just purchased a Triumph. I had to work on the wife a bit and told her this would be the last bike I would buy. (I was crossing my fingers when I told her this) So she gave me the go ahead, Very calmly I told her we don't want to rack up too many miles on the MkIII and the 72 only seats 1, The Buell has clipons and I can't keep the front tire on the ground going 2 up. So the Triumph would be perfect for us, She bought it and I bought the bike. They really are nice machines and if I were you I would just get it, Then you can take your time with the other bike. I have a group of guys I ride with that all ride the new Triumphs and they tell me they are bullet proof. Although my Norton's have never let me down It is nice to have a bike that I am not worried about doing a ton of miles on. Take care and ride safe, Chuck.
 
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While the Scramble might look cool make sure it is what you want. It's moderate on the roads and crappy off-road.
 
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I bought just a few weeks ago a 1995 Trident, for exactly the reasons Horton said; the Norton has been very reliable, stopping once for a broken throttle cable and once for a loose oil filter mount that rattled the oil filter into the swingarm till it punctured. The second incident was what prompted the new purchase. I still couldn't justify the expense of a new bike, and I still wanted something to tinker with a little, so I settle don what i wanted and waited for one to come up. I am VERY impressed with the way it handles everything I can throw at it. It does return only 28mpg instead of the 60mpg fuel figure I am used to, and the left foot gear change takes some getting used to, but being able able to see clearly out of the mirrors was probably the best thing!! :lol:
 

ILLF8ED

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rgrigutis said:
had the misfortune if you will of visiting the local triumph/ducati dealer yesterday. i've a well running '72, non combat that i'm upgrading and rebuilding as i ride it. in the basement is a 2a in pieces that i'm rebuilding/assembling in slow motion. i figured the '72 to be the fast norton for local riding and all around testbed for new stuff. the 2a i'm planning to tour with and reliability and comfort will be focused on. now i saw the damned triumph scrambler and i'm panting. if i got the scrambler the '72 would have to go or my parts slush fund would have to go stalling the 2a for the forseeable future. i kind of hate myself for entertaining the idea of ditching the old bike w/ it's uncertainties for the new bike which promises carefree and troublefree riding. i think i'll stick w/ the old bikes and stay the hell outta the new bike showrooms. hmmmm..... wonder how long it'd take wifey to miss her china and silver. just kidding. merry christmas everybody

Go ride one before buying it. Local Triumph shops around here have a once a year ride anything they have day taking groups out on local back roads. If you want low maintainance riding with touring or sport touring in mind, there are many modern choices that are better than a Commando or retro Triumph. Don't give up on the 750 for fun rides...it's more fun than the Triumph.
 
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From the Triumph website:

"Fuel System: Twin carburetors with throttle position sensor and electric carburetor heaters"

Oh for shame, for shame, ...(sob) ....
Has purity of essence been totally lost?

:roll:
 
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MEHAVEY said:
Oh for shame, for shame, ...(sob) ....
Has purity of essence been totally lost?

Pretty much.

I use my 850 as a daily ride. Nearly 6000 miles since my new head was fitted a couple of months ago and it's going beautifully thank you for asking. Oodles of torque from off idle up. Does it put a smile on my face ? Better than anything else I've ridden. Quite frankly, modern retro styled bikes don't do it for me one bit. The riding experience is what motorcycling is all about and if you're worried about how you and the bike look in the shopfront window as you ride by then I don't know what to say to you. Buy a Harley? They all seem to think they look good/mean/badass/cool/take your pick.
The Norton has the goods which is why we own and ride them. I think a lot of the manufacturers have lost the plot. They have become too wrapped up in the weaving of an image.
 
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for sure i plan to test ride the scrambler and the bonneville t100 once the weather allows. the ducati sport1000 too. one attraction of the old bikes is they smack of can do cachet. i like the fact that i know how my bike works, well mostly, and that i can indeed work on it. the guy who showed me the scrambler has numerous exotic nortons among other classics as well as moderns. the new bikes are faster, stop quicker, handle better, and are largely worryfree this according to him. what it boils down to really is resenting somebody buying into the image not having skinned his knuckles wrenching or learning how to kick start his particular bike or figuring out why the carb is bogging or finding the right parts ad nauseum. i've nothing against real harley guys just the investment bankers during the week who don their do rags and colors on the weekend who don't know the difference between a pushrod and a piston. i would however like the occassional experience of going to the man cave, turning a key, and riding off w/o wondering what i've got to do next on my ride. i was taught early on to dance w/ who brung me so i'll prolly stay w/ what i got.
 
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