Ben's '72 Interstate Rebuild

Scout63

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First post for my rebuild. I did post on the new pictures thread but this seems like a better place. Here is the bike as purchased.
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I'm photographing disassembling and bagging now and enjoying it very much. I will post pictures as things get more interesting.

Reva
Reds to all.

Ben Zehnder
 

Scout63

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More photos:





Initial thoughts: SAE tools work pretty well for general disassembly except for the nuts just larger than 5/16 but smaller than 3/8.

If you drop the oil tank drain bolt behind the z plate it is pretty difficult to recover while oil is dripping down your hands.

BZ
 
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Almost everything not holding the engine and gearbox together is SAE American bolts and nuts. You still need a few special wrenches and sockets for the holdover British stuff.
 

grandpaul

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Some of those "before" photos are going to contrast amazingly with the "after" photos!
 

Scout63

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Thanks Grandpaul:

I never took enough photos in prior projects. Technology these days is great.

Investment in the project so far has been ziplock bags, sharpies and contact cleaner. I did order several disassembly tools from old britts today. The site is just what a newbie needs.

Here is what the bike looks like after a few hours each day this weekend:




I was glad to see that every part seems to be original and unaltered. This is helpful in documenting how to put it back together. Also, even though the rims are very rusty, most of the metal parts, plates and fasteners are not. Only the front brake system is gunky and looks like it was leaky at the top end.

I need to figure out how to support the frame when removing the wheels and drivetrain. I think I'm going to weld up a simple cart as shown on the old britts site. This way I can leave my lift available for some minor winter repairs on other bikes ( fork seal on my /5 and an exhaust fabrication and new tires on my SR).

Regards to all.
 

gortnipper

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Use a milk crate. If you arent going to repaint the frame, then wrap some pipe insulation or bubble wrap around the frame underneath. I some wood under there too instead of the hard edged plastic.


 

Scout63

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Hello all:

I'm still disassembling my bike and enjoying the process very much. Bagging, photographing and making many notes. It is very therapeutic although I wish I could spend more than two or three hours a week on the project. I've decided to build the bike back to stock save for e-ignition, excel rims, better shocks and maybe a steel tank.

I am having trouble removing the primary sprocket key. It is a tight fit in the crankshaft. I've tried gently heating with a heat gun and pulling with pliers but I am afraid of damaging the crankshaft. I assume that the key must be removed in order for the primary inner case oil seal to slide over the crankshaft. Any tricks or ideas?


Thanks and best regards to everyone.
 

grandpaul

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Scout63 said:
I am having trouble removing the primary sprocket key... Any tricks or ideas?
There is a puller that has 2 bolts that thread into the sprocket, and a third larger diameter bolt that screws down against the crank nose to extract the sprocket. Use that.

A small 2 or 3-jaw puller MIGHT be able to get in behind the primary chain, but I doubt it.
 
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grandpaul said:
Scout63 said:
I am having trouble removing the primary sprocket key... Any tricks or ideas?
There is a puller that has 2 bolts that thread into the sprocket, and a third larger diameter bolt that screws down against the crank nose to extract the sprocket. Use that.

A small 2 or 3-jaw puller MIGHT be able to get in behind the primary chain, but I doubt it.
Paul, I think he means the woodruff key that locates the sprocket.

Scout, if you have a small flatblade screwdriver (narrower than the key) you can pry the key out by working the screwdriver blade in under the outer edge of the key and levering it up. A little squirt of penetrating oil won't hurt beforehand. Sometimes they get stuck from rust and running.
 

Scout63

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Thanks Paul and Danno. I did mean the key. The primary sprocket popped right off using the puller and a couple of taps with a bronze drift. I never thought of using penetrating oil.
 

Scout63

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Thanks Danno. I applied some penetrating oil before I went to work, and when I came home for lunch I applied some heat and then tapped the key up and out with a thin screwdriver. Total job time about two minutes. The key material appears to be pretty soft and will need to be replaced but that makes sense as it should be softer than the keyway.

Ben
 

Scout63

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I was able to spend a few hours today dismantling the bike and have everything bagged and boxed but for the engine and gearbox. Hopefully I'll get those out tomorrrow as we are forecast to get 8-12" of snow and no work. I've been wrestling with whether to go all in and re-plate all of the fasteners. Since I will be painting or powdercoating the frame, painting the cylinders, polishing aluminum, new rims, etc, it seems logical to make everything like new. Part of me likes the idea of keeping the paint and fasteners original. I would degrease them, run them (not the tank) though my ultrasonic cleaner and chase threads. The tank I will compound and wax for now. It is a fiberglass blue/silver Interstate in good shape. I will try sealing it and watch carefully.

I realize that there as many opinions as owners, but I'm interested in your thoughts whether to keep a certain level of patina or go all the way.

Ben
 

Fast Eddie

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I think you have already committed yourself by having the frame done.

Any old 'scruffy' bits you bolt onto that will now look awful!

When a whole bike has age related patina, it works.

But if you use old fasteners and tin ware with (for example) powder coated frame, rebuild wheels and new seat, then all of those none restored parts will look bad, really bad!

If it has most of its original fixings, keep them as they're good quality and fit properly. Getting them bright zinc plated is usually really cheap too.

Having said all of that, I am utterly unqualified to advise on such matters... I am probably the worlds worst person for managing the 'scope creep' on my own bike projects which ALWAYS exceed my original plans!
 
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Fast Eddie said:
......Any old 'scruffy' bits you bolt onto that will now look awful!.......
I tend to agree with Nigel's above statement and would recommend using Matt's (cNw) bolt kits. Then for many of the other misc. bolts, Rocky Mt. is a good source for replacements in stainless. Also, with regard to your exhaust system, most folks like the peashooters, but I have read a couple of threads here on the forum that the original interstate pipes had a baffle in them that sounded awesome and unique. However on the down side they are heavy though and it looks from the photo's that one of your is rusted right through. I have a set that I picked up on ebay and will be trying them out on my bike when I get back home, then I can comment first hand as to their sound. Good luck with your build and thanks for posting.
Correction - it is Rocky Point Cycles
 

Scout63

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I think I agree re the nuts and bolts. I'm just feeling intimidated and a little lazy about separating out the fasteners and having them plated. As I disassemble a bike I reassemble the various parts for bagging. If I pull everything apart I lose that history and have to rely on my notes and photos even more.

That being said I know I'll do it. It's like gravity. I can't escape it.
 

Scout63

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You're right- the Interstate mufflers on the bike were toast. The more I look at pictures of bikes the more I like the low pipes. I will fit a new set of Interstate mufflers. It seems like many Interstates have the upswept pipes installed though I can't figure out if this is the way they came from the dealer or are later replacements. I do think that the cNw / Cone Engineering pipes are GORGEOUS. I purchased a CE reverse cone stainless steel muffler for my SR 500 a few years ago and plan to fit it on that bike to split time with the Supertrapp.
 

Scout63

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Last look at an unmolested combat engine (I think). Do I have to wait to inspect the bearings to know? I hope I do it justice. I've watched the Mick Hemmings video several,times so far.
 

Scout63

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What am I forgetting for blasting and painting black? The photo is cut off but no parts are not shown. I'll figure out how to attach smaller pics soon.
 

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