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‘70 Commando Roadster rebuild in GA

Discussion in 'Norton Motorcycle Rebuilds' started by BusDriver330, May 6, 2019.

  1. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018

    You guys are smarter. I fashioned a number of sanding blocks/tubes to debur. Either I did what was necessary or that spindle is made of krypton.
     
  2. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Thanks.
    Nice, new O-rings ‘should’ do the job if everything mates, you’d think.

    Maybe loosening the center spindle screw might solve the pressure problem if ends are siliconed shut?

    This is how my swingarm was when purchased. The cap was cocked a bit sideways, but no problem with a completely dry spindle housing.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. o0norton0o

    o0norton0o VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    I remember someone here suggesting removing the center bolt and fitting a hollow stud in it's place to mount a clear tube as a gravity fed filler tube for spindle lube. That would allow you to seal both ends of the spindle with solid caps and let air burp upward and out the filler tube via gravity and vibration, and be displaced by lube. The clear tube could be long enough to pull outward to fill when, and if, it empties. It would also allow you to easily check to see if the lubricant level was low...

    ... Or you could just ride around and pump some lube in there every now and then...:cool:
     
    BusDriver330 likes this.
  4. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    That’s pretty ingenious. Hope it worked out ok for the original guy.

    I can imagine the Norton engineers discussing this lube design that puts an oil source in line with the meat of the rear tire. Or a race tech guy looking at a little tube of oil in the middle of the swingarm, “Hmmm... can you safety wire that thing?”

    I guess you could argue the Norton engine is a significant oil source to lightly coat the rear tire in oil:)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  5. NPeteN

    NPeteN

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    The engine sure was a significant oil source to lightly coat almost my entire bike! 50 years, no rust.

    Again, Frank's advice is probably best. Ride it and give it a squirt of oil now and then.
     
    BusDriver330 likes this.
  6. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Swingarm buttoned up, no 140w leaks for now. Thanks for the wisdom.

    Got a few more things fit like head steady, head bearings, yoke. edit- Deleted the previous caged roller bearings(which replaced the loose ball bearings), with tapered caged. Hopefully this will improve steering performance and maintenance. I will have some decent caged rollers if anyone needs ‘em.

    [​IMG]

    Took a look at some of the restomod, race bike threads and thought about deleting my thread. So not worthy with these geniuses here.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
    o0norton0o likes this.
  7. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    With over 1300 views, that’d be disappointing to a lot of other Norton Nerds.

    Carry on !
     
    Craig and BusDriver330 like this.
  8. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    I’m noticing a hierarchy defined by the tools most used.

    Some are spending time on lathes, drill presses, using micrometers, digital rulers.

    My main tools are degreaser, 320grit, steel wool, rust inhibitors, touchup paint. And I’d be lost without the AndoverN site:)

    Looking forward to on track pics/vids, F’Eddie
     
    Craig likes this.
  9. NPeteN

    NPeteN

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    Those fellas with those tools are most likely involved in that line of work for a living (not ALL but I'd imagine a good amount) don't be intimidated. You're doing your bike justice with the tools you've got and the skill level you're at! Ain't that the heart of motorcycling?

    P.S. most of us are in it for the pics, you don't need to be building a rocket ship to satisfy.
     
    BusDriver330 likes this.
  10. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018

    Them’s some cool ‘rocket ships’, though.
     
    NPeteN likes this.
  11. NPeteN

    NPeteN

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    Be careful with engine degreaser, it can remove beneficial grease around nuts and bolts, allowing water and other bad crap to seep in. Get a good fastener lubricant when you start bolting things back up.
     
    BusDriver330 likes this.
  12. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    On top of that one. Thanks
     
  13. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Update for my ‘70.

    I’ve officially been indoctrinated into the ‘Felt Washer Haters’ club. You would think in this day and age of safety, a warning label or California state ban at the least.

    “Men over 60 and pregnant women should stay clear of inner primary felt washer installation”.

    The ‘70 750 build will continue after fingers have healed.

    Cheers
     
    gortnipper likes this.
  14. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Fork fail!

    In the process of refurbishing forks, I’ve experienced ‘circlip failure’ trying to slide hammer the bushing out.

    Anyone have a correct method for bushing extraction from lower(slider)?

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  15. Time Warp

    Time Warp .......back to the 70's. VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  16. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Thanks for that, Time Warp. But:

    Everything went well with right fork. Lower bearing drives brass upper and seal out with no problem.

    The left stanchion lost the circlip and lower bearing ‘inside’ slider. So now I need an inside bearing puller or similar to get the brass and seal out. If that doesn’t make sense, the lower bearing and circlip are rattling around in the slider with no fork tube attached.

    I’ll try to get my hands on a large bearing puller I guess, or try to destroy the brass without destroying anything else.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  17. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    On a better note. I was able to drive the new lower yoke pinch bolts into the new AN lower yoke after ‘cutting and cleaning’ threads for about 20minutes.

    I hope the original Norton factory workers didn’t have to clean out every thread to get bolts into parts.;)
     
  18. Time Warp

    Time Warp .......back to the 70's. VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    I forgot to add for the person who removes the bushes next time stock or long RGM, it doesn't hurt to put some anti seize on the OD of the upper bush before installing it....

    If you have the lower casting off you might be able to use a drift through the lower bolt hole to tap the bush upward but there is always the risk of damaging the bore surface.
    Maybe a slide hammer with an end to get under the bush or maybe even heating the lot in the oven might help.
     
  19. BusDriver330

    BusDriver330

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2018
    Thanks for the help. I’ll post the results if I’m able to extract successfully.

    Otherwise, I hope no one notices a shiny new left slider on my 50year old Norton.

    Good tip on the anti seize. Had to clean out black paint-like spots where the old brass was resting.
     
  20. L.A.B.

    L.A.B. Moderator VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004


    Cut slots in the bush with a hacksaw blade (in a holder or end wrapped with tape) until it either loosens or can be broken into pieces.

    [​IMG]


    Sintered bronze ('Oilite').
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019

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