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Webby's Triton build

Discussion in 'Triumph (Classic)' started by Webby03, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. Foxy

    Foxy

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Gday Guys, sorry for the highjack but, I could have done with your help refurbishing my other love! One Baby Lakes Bi-plane. New stits nearly finished then the paint, cant wait as Im having major withdrawls!!
    [​IMG]
    Foxy :mrgreen: :twisted:
     
  2. Foxy

    Foxy

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Gday Webby, just looking again at your pics, I see and read that you're mounting the ignition switch on the right side. My thoughts are that it should go on the left side seeing this is the side you usually hop on or off the bike, also the kick stand is on the left side because of this reason. I usually approach a bike from the left and put in ignition key so to me it would be a more convenient place? You hop on a horse from the left aswell, wondering if this is derivative?
    The battery placement and alloy plate looks good.
    Foxy
     
  3. Triton Thrasher

    Triton Thrasher

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    It doesn't have to be strong. It only has to stop the battery wandering out towards the back of the bike. The tinny bits hold the battery down.
     
  4. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Thanks Foxy,
    Yes, you are correct, you get on a bike from the left, I too imagine this is a leftover from the days when we all rode horses, just like the same reason you and the Brits and yourselves drive on the left, this, in the day was to keep your right hand free to carry a lance (I've no idea what you did in that era if you were left handed!).
    Anyway, back to bikes, I choose the left side as the clutch lever is on the left, so if you have any trouble getting the bike into neutral you can keep the clutch pulled in and just shut the bike off, I'm still undecided if I will mount a kill switch or not, as I'll be using EI, you can't just wire the switch to earth like with a points system.

    Webby
     
  5. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Quite true TT, most of the stress from the battery would be taken by the metal. But I do think Jean has a point, if anything a thicker O ring would look better :)

    Webby
     
  6. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Cool aircraft Foxy :)
    What is it?
    I don't think you'll be needing my speciality on it, I do Non Destructive Testing, (X ray and Ultrasonic inspections for example) Not much call for these sort of inspections on non pressurized aircraft.

    Webby
     
  7. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Nice, I like the Citations, I used to look after a couple of them in the UK and Belgium. One of my clients here in Bordeaux has recently bought one for medivac flights, hopefully I'll get some work out of it.
    As for the SD360, I'm originally from where they were built, They're a good aircraft and have flown on many between the UK and the Channel Islands years ago. Although the only maintenance I've done was a silly surface wave ultrasonic inspection on the elevator attach fittings, I really don't think the inspection worked very well! I did a couple of weeks contract work in Shorts (now Bombardier) a couple of years ago, it wasn't fun at all! If you're used to working on the line or in a hangar, a factory is a bit of a culture shock :)

    You're lucky you can still get old parts, most places over here in Europe now insist they are destroyed so they cannot be reused, shame as I've seen plenty of good stuff being cut up :(

    Webby
     
  8. bwolfie

    bwolfie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    The company I worked for is the largest civilian operator of Shorts, 40 at last count. And carcasas of at least 20.
     
  9. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Cool, they're good aircraft, there's still plenty flying the mail night flights over here in Europe.

    Changing the subject,
    I'll have to refuse your kind offer of the ignition switch, by the time I would have paid for shipping etc. from the US it would be cheaper to buy a new one. But please let me know if you're selling anything else, you never know :)

    Webby
     
  10. Foxy

    Foxy

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Gday Webby, my plane is a home built (not by me),smaller version of the Great Lakes, hence the name Baby Lakes. Its extremely agile and rated at 12+ 12 - g,s, cant destroy it in the air but can make one self alot wooooozzy! Loops, rolls etc are a real joy and frightening unsuspecting surrounding farmers is a Buzz! :mrgreen:
    The experience of flying this machine is awesome, just like strapping wings on your back.
    Foxy
     
  11. Jeandr

    Jeandr

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    While I have some machine tools, I do a lot of work with these "woodworking" tools. I use my radial arm saw to cut aluminum plates and bar stock. At first, I used an 80 tooth finishing blade, but lately I found some carbide non-ferrous blades at my favorite surplus place for a pittance.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    To cut curves, I bought a 9" plastic band saw, I use 15 tooth 1/8" blades and while it is not super fast, it does the job better than a jig saw.

    [​IMG]

    This band sander is invaluable to do final shaping

    [​IMG]

    Jean
     
  12. grandpaul

    grandpaul VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    I have a friend who builds custom band grinders & sanders for knife making; they can be used to make anything. He knocked out my sidestand mounting lug in about 10 minutes, including welding.

    Very nice rigs with variable speed drives (digital frequency modulators).

    He's got one model with three different working wheels on one rig; each wheel is a different diameter, to work with different size stock / finishes. Also, it rotates from a flat table to a vertical one. Pretty trick stuff.
     
  13. Jeandr

    Jeandr

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    I'm sure I saw that somewhere on the web, sure looked slick. I have had mine for at least 30 years with the same washing machine motor I picked up for free from the neighbor's trash.

    Jean
     
  14. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    If only I had the space :(
    I agree with you both that a belt sander is handy, I use the one at work in the evenings or weekends (once the management have gone home)
    But it is one of my top ten tools to buy, that, a pillar drill, a band saw, a small MIG welder and a small lathe to fab up studs, spacers etc.
    Wait and see, if I move back to Belgium I might be able to get a bigger garage. In the meantime my Girlfriend has already moved home to Belgium so I guess I could just move the bikes into the living room to make space :)

    Webby
     
  15. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    I had a little time this week and received my speedo drive and rear brake plate in the post so it was time to finalize the position of the motor in the frame.
    I borrowed a laser plumb line from a friend as I figured it work pretty well, it did!
    I stuck the laser to the top of the head stock and making sure it was level tried to figure out where to mount the motor, as it turns out central is pretty good, the vertical split crankcases make life easy.
    In this photo you can just see the laser beams along the central crankcase joint and over the centerline mark I'd put on the swingarm.
    [​IMG]

    I put a mark on the rear hub at 86mm measured from the edge of the brake drum and set it central in the swingarm. You may ask why 86mm? Because that's the standard Triumph rear wheel offset.
    [​IMG]

    As I was there I had a quick look at the chain run and alignment, looks pretty good, I'll need to install the gearbox output shaft and front sprocket to be sure. One thing's sure, I've more than enough room to run a WM4 and 120 section rear tire.
    [​IMG]

    Webby
     
  16. grandpaul

    grandpaul VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Too high tech.

    I take a look with my good eye and as long as I can see the front sprocket from the back, I'm good to go.

    hee hee

    (maybe it's not quite THAT crude...)
     
  17. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    You know me GPZ, I always like to go over the top! (That's why my engine plates are larger than yours :))
    I only borrowed the laser for fun, but in fact I think it works pretty good.

    Webby
     
  18. Jeandr

    Jeandr

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Hobot has started a trend it seems :mrgreen:

    Jean
     
  19. Webby03

    Webby03

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    I won't be this week, she who must be obeyed is coming home tomorrow for the weekend, maybe next week :)
     
  20. bwolfie

    bwolfie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Just ask for the kitchen pass, all will be good!! Althou I did just roll mine into my basment workshop while she was at work, She found out after the fact, but was cool with it. I love having a fully exposed basment and a patio door. House heat all winter.
     

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