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Trump seems to be doing well so far...

Discussion in 'Access Norton Pub' started by Fast Eddie, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. xbacksideslider

    xbacksideslider VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010

    Lighten up.

    Multiculturalism's demand, insistence, that all cultures are equal is a stupid refusal to recognize that some cultures and idea sets are more successful than others in serving human needs. Perhaps you think that the quality of life in the USSR or the CCCP of the 1970s was superior to that in the free world? Perhaps you think that the life of American blacks under southern prejudice and bigotry was equivalent to their life in the north? Obviously not.

    No, culture matters.

    As for cites, here you go, several cites, which document how many Oceanic cultures lost knowledge, both of how to build transoceanic craft and of the methods of transoceanic navigation; this is not to knock Polynesia but to show how it happens to all cultures. Oceana offers illustrative case studies of the loss of cultural knowledge precisely because of the isolation that the fact of islands provides to the analysis.

    http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarl ... d1-d3.html

    " . . . .The Maori has forgotten the art of building the form of sea-going craft in which his ancestors reached the shores of New Zealand from the islands of the Central and Eastern Pacific. . . ."

    http://www.pbs.org/wayfinders/polynesian8.html

    " . . . .the reconstruction and sailing of ancient voyaging canoes becomes more than adventurous and anthropologically-fruitful excursions into the past. These projects become ways culturally-uprooted Polynesians can themselves rediscover the means by which their islands were discovered and settled, indeed their ancient cultural heritage as a uniquely oceanic people. . . . ."



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polynesian_navigation

    " . . . . . Knowledge of the traditional Polynesian methods of navigation was widely lost after contact with and colonization by Europeans. . . ."
     
  2. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Australia has a problem with culture which is probably the same problem America has to some extent. The only basis upon which Australia can compete globally and still justify our overheads - educated workforce and high salaries, is on the basis of QUALITY. We have the wrong mindset and most of us buy on price rather than quality. I don't think we should all become Japanese, but they always seem to 'do it right first time'. If we don't get our industrial situation right, we must all become losers.
     
  3. lazyeye6

    lazyeye6 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Fair enough. And to quote the preeminent cultural anthropologist of the 20th century, "If we are to achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse human gift will find a fitting place.
     
  4. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    With the right kind of progressive leader, it is possible to change the culture. The problem is that we are all very conditioned, so 'as it was, so it shall ever be' is the normal mindset. The only cultures which have changed dramatically in modern times, have been those which have been almost bombed into extinction - Japan and Germany - now world leaders, thanks to the Marshall Plan and American know-how.
     
  5. xbacksideslider

    xbacksideslider VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Ahhh, yes, that's a quote from the greatest punk of the 20th century - Margaret Mead.
    Free love in Samoa. Just what the "hung up" prudish conservative values of the West needed.
    Made her career. Instant professor. Instant celebrity.

    But . . . she, the queen of 20th C anthropology, fooled by her own arrogance, her own wishes, and the sexy stories of the adolescent Samoan girls she wanted to believe, and who she thought her lessers. Punked.

    http://scribalterror.blogs.com/scribal_ ... samoa.html

    And . . . . academia naturally loved it - free love in Samoa - they ate it up . . . for 50 years . . . . until Derek Freeman discovered the punking.

    Of course, there followed decades of politicized counterattacks on Freeman.
    Lots of PC . . . . . "I haven't read Freeman's book but I KNOW he's wrong." Typical.
    It continues, in anthropology classes today, professors refuse to assign Freeman's book.
    Better that their students hear no evil, see no evil, smell no evil.
    That's science for ya. Politicized science.

    Here's an interesting, and even handed, history of the affair -
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOCYhmnx6o8
     
  6. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    If you read about Captain Cook's voyages to the Pacific, one of the reasons sailors wanted to go with him was they would visit Tahiti, where most of the natives had the clap.
     
  7. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011

    I wonder where the natives got it from in the first place :?: :shock:
     
  8. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Off the camels ?
     
  9. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Camels in Tahiti, that’s a new one on me, seriously have you seen any Arabs with his 100 camels and 20 wives on this island lately :?:
     
  10. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Camels are where they claim the Romans originally caught the clap. They took it to England and the Poms took it to Tahiti. Love conquers all ?
     
  11. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Question; of which Kingdom was Tahiti part of until its annexation in 1880 :?:
    A ; the French, I’ll say no more

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tahiti

    BTY, if the Poms gave Tahiti the clap, how come you Aussies haven’t been complaining when we shipped loads of people down under through the ages :?:
     
  12. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    I recently read a book about Captain Cook's voyages to the Pacific. He ended up as mad as a hatter. He thought he could give the Hawaiians a hard time and they cut him up into little pieces. On his last trip, he had Captain Bligh with him. When Bligh later went to Tahiti with the Bounty his crew went sex-mad and mutinied to get back there. I don't think there was any more clap amongst our convicts than there was in the English population in London. Bligh ended up as Governor of Australia until the conservatives undermined him. He was not all bad.
     
  13. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Not the full story there appears to be a large chunk missing from your version of the Bounty’s history lesson, Blight might not have been a bad man when he had mellowed in his old age, but read the following;

    Bounty had left England in 1787 on a mission to collect and transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti in the West Indies. After A five-month layover in Tahiti, the Bounty made its way back loaded with breadfruits of which there was not enough water carried on broad to water the plants, the captain Blight, in his infinite wisdom, rationed the amount of daily water the crew could drink which finally sparked a mutiny amongst some of the crew- a sure fire death sentence if they were caught and court martialled, so the rest is history…..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutiny_on_the_Bounty
     
  14. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Crew were probably of less £ value than cargo!

    The 'good old days' weren't necessarily good for everyone I guess...
     
  15. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    It depends on who is telling the story. The conservatives have one version which was used to justify the actions of Captain John Macarthur in fomenting the Rum Rebellion. The left have another version.
    In the good old days - ten days out of port and it was rum, sodomy and the lash and they were eating weevils.
     
  16. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Eddie, I think that many people such as yourself, don't have an appreciation of the Australian mentality. The convicts made us what we are. One thing we don't teach our kids about in school, is the Rum Rebellion, because part of the mindset involved still exists to this day. When Bligh was governor he had responsibility for running the NSW colony and had responsibility for doing public works using convict labour. The currency used to pay the convicts was rum. Macarthur was a free settler who had come out of regiment which was used to guard the convicts. He had his own still, so effectively printed his own money and used convicts to work on his property. Bligh confiscated the still, so Macarthur fomented a rebellion by impugning Bligh's character and ultimately arresting him. The Brits then sent Lachlan MacQuarie to restore order. Macarthur then went to London and approached the Privy Council to square-off. The Brits were not stupid, they had seen all the scams, so they sent him on his way. The descendants of the two groups - redcoats and convicts are still in Sydney to this day in the form of cops and criminals.
     
  17. johnod

    johnod

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016

    As an outsider , I was confident you guys could not elect anyone dumber than Dubya, boy was I wrong.

    I was also confident you couldn't possibly fall for the BS coming out of Trumps pie hole, wrong again.

    Apparently , sadly, I've been giving you guys to much credit for common sense.
     
  18. Danno

    Danno

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    His backers were smart enough to play the Electoral College "losers win" game and Hillary stepped on one toe after another, but there is much truth to what you say.
     
  19. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Trump is the President the Americans had to have. He is the natural extension of 'the cult of the individual'. However what follows will be very interesting - the reaction to Trump's idiocy. He is also good for Australia. We have elected some real ratbags from time to time.
     
  20. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
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