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Slipper clutch for Commando ?

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by acotrel, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    I am wondering if anyone has used a slipper clutch on a Commando ?

     
  2. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    An answer to a question only you have asked.
     
    JimC and nortriubuell like this.
  3. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Why??? The only way to truely find out is to put one on and use it, I have no problems with my stock set up after finding the right oil to use.

    Ashley
     
  4. MexicoMike

    MexicoMike

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    I have a slipper clutch (OEM) on one of my other bikes but TBH, have never noticed it feeling any different than a regular clutch as far as normal engine braking is concerned. I ASSUME if I was at speed and accidentally shifted down to too low a gear it would prevent rear wheel slippage/skidding. I ASSUME that a modern bike with a high performance, high compression engine could benefit whereas, IMO, a stock Commando wouldn't. IOW, I don't think my Commando needs one but it sounds like a good idea on a Ducati Panigale! :)
     
    concours likes this.
  5. SteveA

    SteveA VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    It is a good idea if you want to change down without matching engine and gearbox speeds......and also have available excess braking force so don't 'need' the engine braking!

    Most Commando owners posting here want more braking, and a slipper clutch is not acceptable within vintage/classic racing regulations!

    Sounds like a good idea on a modern racing superbike. A Ducati Panigale needs it for race homologation and track days, typically in the hands of less than expert riders, not the average (almost legal) road riding situation.
     
  6. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Traded off bikes with my young neighbor, whom I’ve ridden with he & his Dad, since he was 7yo.
    I could feel the slipper on the RSV4 on the street. 474D4B94-BE79-44EE-9766-135A636B626C.jpeg FCC87B47-5D03-423A-AF4C-36B1EA631485.jpeg
     
  7. acadian

    acadian VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Our test mule Bimmer 1000RR at the transport ministry has a slipper clutch, dealer option I believe. I deliberately dropped 2 gears on it at Mosport to see if it worked... yes indeed. Same scenario on the R6 without one results in noticeable chirp.

    I'm with Mexico, can't see the need for one on a 50bhp Commando
     
    concours likes this.
  8. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    The reason I asked the question is that in the extreme, all bikes end up with the same problems. When I ride my bike, I play it up and down through the gears, like a piano. But if you end up in the situation where you are really going for it and make a mistake, a slipper clutch might make the bike more forgiving. It might be the difference between staying upright or ending up on your bum.

    https://www.dirtrider.com/tests/parts-accessories/141_0804_hinson_btl_slipper_clutch/
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  9. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    SteveA - In Australia, our historic racing rules are more about looks than authenticity.. In 2008, I went to the Goodwood Revival. Even there, there were one or two bikes that looked a bit wrong, but most of what was there was either genuine or a very convincing retro. In Australia, the argument is often 'it could have existed', even when it never did. I have never liked historic racing. I would rather have racing with fewer rules, but based on the TYPE of bike and engine capacity. In a single cylinder 500cc four stroke class, an original Manx would still be a very strong contender against anything more modern, except for MotoGP bikes. As far as Commandos are concerned, I would be extremely happy to race against air-cooled Ducatis, BMWs, Guzzis and Harleys of less than 1000cc capacity. I am just sad that for me that will never happen.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  10. Time Warp

    Time Warp .......back to the 70's. VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    I removed my post from yesterday.
    People used to moan about the slipper (which was really a back torque limiter) in the Suzuki TL1000 but no one actually did anything, just moan.
    Back in 2007 I did some online homework coming to the conclusion that the GSXR1000 of that period which did have a slipper clutch had the same 25 mm clutch shaft as the TL1000.
    I bought a GSXR clutch, did some observations and then removed the clutch unit from the drive gear and after some machining and other custom bits grafted the two together (Of course posting how I did it online made a pretty profit for a couple of people who copied it for sale in numbers even to this day (UK/Australia)

    I said yesterday, a slipper in a road going Commando is probably not worth it but on second thought there might be some merit (If some bolt in Free slipper unit was given to you) with the ratio gaps in a four speed cluster on the down shift to soften the transitions.
    I'm not sure the average punter (road) is back shifting like a tap dancer all the same.

    I think a dual gerotor oil pump would be handier.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  11. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    A slipper clutch on a Commando would probably never do much except if you were racing and were forced to down-shift in a corner. Then it might be smoother ?
     
  12. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    With some guys, having all mod cons on their bike is about bragging rights. They never get themselves into extreme situations, so never really use what they have. If I am road racing and really go for it, I am always very careful because everything is being used near it's limits. You can have the best tyres , brakes and suspension - but in the middle of a very high speed corner, you need to be super-smooth. If you get balked, then what the bike is like when you react becomes very important.
    I'm inclined to do a bit of investigation into slipper clutches on dirt bikes. Some of them work in two directions - as you accelerate they pull the pressure plate on harder to prevent clutch slip, as well as acting as a torque limiter on back-off.
     
  13. Hortons Norton

    Hortons Norton

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    When I was a kid I would go to the Yamaha dealership and drool over that yellow 400, I wanted that bike so bad. And just happens to be the color of the Norton a teenager had in my neighborhood.
     
  14. swooshdave

    swooshdave

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    Apr 15, 2009
  15. baz

    baz VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    I can't say anything
    I looked earlier at the thread about commando engines in a feather bed frame
    And I asked how in a featherlastic how the headstock was supported ?
    And then saw I'd asked the same question in 2014 ?
    Proof of senility if ever it were needed!!!
    At least I'm consistent! :D
     
  16. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    My first Yam Enduro was a ‘69, had 60, 125, 175, 250 and now a 400. Missed it all the years in between. It’s optically tatty, but mechanically sound. I’d leave on a 3000 mile trip tomorrow...
    7,000 redline, 8 strokes (sometimes 4) mostly when not pulling... but lots of street legal fun.
    You’re right, it was looked at as a big, beastly dual-sport (enduro) bike in the day...
     
    Hortons Norton likes this.
  17. jan nelder

    jan nelder

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2018
    however, my 961 could use one occasionally, especially 4th to 3rd. A lot more noticeable than my older Commando.
     
  18. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    So the answer to my question is that nobody who has seen this topic has used a slipper clutch on a Commando ? - Either that or they don't ride fast enough to be curious ?
     
  19. swooshdave

    swooshdave

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Son, no one rides as fast as you do.
     
  20. acotrel

    acotrel

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    Jun 30, 2012
    I am always faster than I ever was.
     
    gortnipper likes this.

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