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rear brake shoes (2015)

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by Onder, Nov 20, 2015.

  1. no750

    no750

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2016
    had the same problem aproximatly 1 year ago.

    some cheap aftermarket product i tried before did fit, but without any good deaccealration.

    because of good advice here i bougt this high friction rgm brake shoes for my rear break.

    they didnt fit in, like yours.

    i milled both of the flat cast surfaces (i do not remember the kind of matirial, but definitly without the 06.0013 slipper on , instructions told there is no need for ) until the excentershaft encounters equally and they nearly fit in. then i used grindingpaperin the drum on both shoes. ... just a evening with beer and music...

    the breaks are doing very fine now, but i am sure you will find better advice.

    good luck
     
    Hortons Norton likes this.
  2. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Certainly, the friction coefficent of the lining material is the wild card.
    And the radius they are made to.
    I will report back.
     
    Time Warp likes this.
  3. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    I would have been pleased to obtain these brake shoes in the 1970s; they are the complete opposite to what I could obtain over the counter then, completely undersize and worse than useless. All you need to do is get your wheel spindle and nut (and with added spaces) fit a .020 shim under each brake shoe flat and find someone with a lathe to turn it down to the EXACT brake drum size, remove the raised lip if any on the drum, remove the shims , file a 30degree chamfer on the leading edges and HEY-PRESCO! You now have possibly one of the best brakes you can get.-what more do you want?

    The shoes will then rub against the drum 100% of the way round instead of 40-75% with undersize shoes-and last longer-it’s well worth the effort.
    NOTE; this only works with OVERSIZE brake shoes fitted!
    It’s the same way that Messes Joe Dunphy and Ferodo Brakes did all those racing & road brakes!!!

    If they didn’t know what they were doing then you obviously think you know better.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  4. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Re;” I milled both of the flat cast surfaces”

    I wouldn’t go down this route

    Why? The steel foot on the brake shoe is case hardened, if you grind/ machine this you will come to soft unhardened metal, which will wear out even faster creating a problem you previously didn’t have. Look up P. 23 and my other brake shoe on this website.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  5. DogT

    DogT VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    I've always found the rear brake to be problematical at best and just don't use it too much. I am of the opinion that the rear wheel is way to easy to lock up and loose control, even on the highway. I use the rear brakes as the last resort and sparingly. Gearing down is almost better. About the only time I really use them is going down the hill from my house on a gravel 20° grade which can be a heart stopper if the front brake locks up. And believe me I use the rear sparingly. I mostly just coast downhill in neutral (which is illegal in VA, don't ask me why) and hope for the best which always seems to work, hasn't hurt me so far.

    But that's no reason to ignore the rear brake, it does have a function, even with my TLS front.
     
  6. kommando

    kommando

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    That RGM brake lining is a very close match to the linings I had put on my BSA 8" single sided brake shoes by Villers Services UK. You send them your old shoes and the following dimensions, ID of the drum and the OD of the shoes fitted to the brake plate minus the lining. They then make new linings and bond them to the old shoes with a clearance to the drum. Cost is £20 to £25 for UK customers, so if you have an old set of shoes its cheaper than RGM and as long as you measure correctly no fitting issues.
     
    concours likes this.
  7. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Thank you gentlemen. All good stuff.
    However, I’m just not accepting that I need to turn replacing brake shoes into a custom machining project. I reject the idea that backer plate hole location and drum diameter vary so widely (mass production PROHIBITS it) that a set of shoes can’t be supplied to bolt in & go. (like elevendy million other vehicles on the planet)
    I am not criticising those who’ve “balanced & blueprinted” their TLS fronts, I am a big fan of REAL BRAKES.
    But, having my bike inoperative for 16 months (mostly, again, due to dawg bawls quality engine parts supplied), I’m not in a position to suffer any more silly delays. By “silly” I mean parts that DO NOT FIT.
    If they were sold as “needs finishing”, or some such, ok, but, just more expensive unusable crap.
    I’ll try the run of the mill Taiwanese rear brakes, & report back.
    kommando, I have my original shoes, date stamped “6/74”, I could send them out at my leisure.
     
  8. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    I contend that the perveyor should perform this operation:
    E1F8A1A5-CCD2-4C7A-85CC-48B2952A658B.jpeg
    That simple, 30 minute fixture is what theyshould be using, to FINISH the parts sold.
     
  9. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011

    You have something adjusted incorrectly on your rear brake. They can be made to NOT lock up with a few minor tweaks; break arm should be at 90 degrees when fully on any more than that it will lock up. If break grabs the drum is either out of round/and or/there is not enough chamfer on the leading edge of the brake shoes. Two minutes with a file will cure it.
     
  10. batrider

    batrider

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Rear brake is good to have when you hit stutter bumps in the turn and suddenly you're going 60 in the deep grass of a cow pasture. It's like throwing out an anchor.
     
    concours likes this.
  11. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Maybe so, but and a big BUT, what about all the difference wear on the brake drum diameter which occur after XX years use? this method takes no account of that and will at best leave you with only use 75% of the with shoes being used, unless it is a PERFECT fit like the method described on P. 23.
     
  12. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Convert to Cable rear brake throw away the rod.
     
  13. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    I had the same with the RGM ones and being in a rush, and not using the back brake much anyway, I linished them down to size. They worked ok, but I wouldn’t nominate it for ‘best rear brake’ award!

    Andover Norton’s one’s fit straight in. No linishing required. However, I thought there was too much ‘flash’ around the spring mounting pegs, I wasn’t happy the springs sat securely and did file these up a bit.

    I’m with concours, if RGM want to sell oversized shoes that require machining to fit, that is perfectly fine PROVIDED they’re labelled as such.

    Shoes not labelled as such should fit straight in, just like the zillions sold by Halfords, Kwik-Fit, et al.

    Ain’t rocket science.
     
    concours and Nortoniggy like this.
  14. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    25 mile test loop. The Emgo shoes feel great, good initial bite, progressive. Will advise on longevity.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019

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