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rear brake shoes (2015)

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by Onder, Nov 20, 2015.

  1. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Just got a set of RGM high friction rear brake shoes. Significantly thicker linings prevent
    any entry into the drum. :-(
    Advise on next step? Drum is new and true.
    Everything else pretty much is too.
    74 mk2.
     
  2. pete.v

    pete.v

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Call Roger.
     
  3. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Yes of course but it is Friday! :-(
     
  4. DogT

    DogT VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Take the spacers off the brake cams and you may be able to get them on and then use some sandpaper to grind them down a bit. They probably need arcing anyhow. I think that's pretty much what I did.
     
  5. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    I thought of you and the sand paper arcing. But one hates to have to wail on new parts at least
    until RGM give me some feedback.
    The linings are twice as thick as new stock ones. Fine if you have a full brake shop not so if you
    are a bit limited.
    Was wondering how precisely it can be done with the shoes mounted on the backing plate
    and spinning it on lathe. Anybody has done this, could you chime in?
     
  6. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011

    You are lucky you have this problem; most new brake shoes require a lot of the brake adjuster to be taken up because they are so slack.

    Fairly common practice for the Ferodo racing lining brake shoe lining people- they used to have a race van that went to the UK circuits with a Myford 240 volt High Swing lathe in the back - I would like to know what happened to it.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/myfordcapstan/

    scroll down for brake pic.
    The brake drum is mounted on a mandrel with oversize shoes and .020 inch shims under the flat part/brake pivot pin where the shoes go. The shoes are turned down to exactly the drum diameter, then the shims are removed, then this is important :!: file a 30degree lead in on the leading edge of the shoes-ignore this and the wheel will tend to grab/lock up :!:
     
  7. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Quite a lathe!
    Being latheless Ill prob go the DogT route, file down the flats a bit until the shoes just
    enter and then use his sand paper adhered to the drum surface and arc it in.
    As hobot would say 'shade tree'.
     
  8. DogT

    DogT VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Actually I got that idea from norbsa. I just added pics. I'm sure the true mechanics are weeping.
     
  9. aceaceca

    aceaceca

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    I have been meaning to arc my shoes for a while now. I purchased an Ammco shoe arcing machine and planned to get it all set up and offer it out.The brakes on my 71 are nearly worthless by todays standards. You will never bed them in with use. I particularly ride mostly where I hardly do any stopping to speak of. I am interested to see the wear pattern on my front shoes whenever I finally get them off to have a look. I know from prior Triumph and Norton drum systems that they can be made to work well enough if everything is "correct" as it were. Dogs comments on the improvement in his front brake after he red neck arced his proves this out. I should not actually use the term red neck. Dogs ingenious method of arcing would be more accurate. I have used a sander to arc 8 shoes on a Brit foreign car as I could not get the drums on. And that was when there was still asbestos in the linings.
     
  10. seattle##gs

    seattle##gs

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2014
    you might send the brake drum and plate complete to Vintage Brake...shouldn't be too much to arc the linings to fit.
     
  11. JimC

    JimC

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    +1 on Vintage Brake!

    Years ago I sent my lazy rear brake, drum and plate, to Mike Morse at Vintage Brake. Got back a wonderful, progressive stopper. Mike knows brakes.
     
  12. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    As I posted elsewhere on this website, I had both my drum brakes relined by that brake master Joe Dunphy brakes- racing linings in the front 2LS–because I went racing, brown in the rear.......... they were a class above the normal standard 750 brakes :!: ;

    parts-you-dont-regret-buying-t20044-30.html
     
  13. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    I have used Morse in the past, does great work but he is astonishingly slow so I just cannot
    leave the bike unmoveable for any extended length. Too bad he would be the go to guy for sure.
    It will be the sandpaper approach this time.
     
  14. Frankie17

    Frankie17

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    if you have a new rear drum fitted why not fit stock Ferodo FSB922
    fit straight in without modification
     
  15. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    4F21E6C1-5223-4BDF-9425-CC5CC2E464D7.jpeg 4412BD51-6529-44DA-9173-A917D59D5869.jpeg 909C612E-C1B0-454E-BAA1-BEE898E2852B.jpeg


    Same stuff.
    I got these a while back on the recommendation of some one on the forum here, good braking power. I had no idea they do NOT FIT. (Neither old or new drum)
    Can anyone recommend some that fit without machining?
     
  16. Time Warp

    Time Warp .......back to the 70's. VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    There must be someone with a brake shoe lathe ?
    If you want the brake to work and be progressive it's worth the effort, it would not surprise me if Vintage Brake used the same compound (MZ Gold)
    #
    As far as the OP.

    2lbceio.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019
  17. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Thanks, but I’m not doing the truing/arcing thing. I fix lathes all day long, and, could search a shop to swing it. If I had a drum front, maybe...
    But the rear does so little, I’ll not invest the time.
    It’s already solved, my parts hoarding paid off. Some GEN-U-INE Taiwanese parts I got years ago saved the day. Fit like a glove in all aspects, cast in steel cam shoe, when in the drum need only a slight movement of the arm to contact.
     
  18. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
  19. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    No mention of sanding/arcing/fitting/fettling to fit.
    5C041033-9D8D-4BD6-B1B2-17DE629C29A7.png
     
  20. Time Warp

    Time Warp .......back to the 70's. VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Any brake shoe worth buying will require arcing to the drum, RGM should state that as far as a drop in (or not)
    The EMGO shoes are no good for the front, stopping time would be measured by calendar. :D

    The problem with this sort of thing is, a good deal of people want a drop in product but how many are going to retain the 40 year old drum compared to buying a new unworn item ( Buy a NOS front Commando hub for instance, I think not )....... Then you have the problem, is the installed brake shoe arc of some random manufacturer's product going to work with some others who made the new drum, maybe, maybe not, hence the need (Especially fronts so you can actually stop with some progression) for oversized shoes so the fit is optimum including hubs that have been machined to a bigger OD for surface refurbishment .

    Me, not oversized, not worth buying but more related to the fronts because your life does depend on it, just because you have a 1970's motorcycle does not mean it has to stop like one.... but that again is relating to front drum brake Commando's but a non progressive rear brake can get people into trouble with large prolonged application.
     

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