Oil Change - Step by Step (2005)

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Anybody have an easy to follow step by step process for an oil change on my '72 Commando? 1st change since owning.

Thanks,

Howie
 

illf8ed

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'72 oil change

Howie,

Remove the seat & remove the two bolts holding the oil cover on. At the lower part of the oil tank is a drain bolt. Remove this while holding an empty milk jug with funnel to catch the oil. You can lean the bike toward that side to get more oil out. If you have an oil filter unscrew it with a basin under to catch the spillage then replace with a new filter. Last remove the drain plug at the bottom of the crankcase & drain into a catch basin...should be about half a cup of oil in there. Make sure all the drain plugs are in and tight with copper sealing washers. Replace either 20w50wt or 50wt oil or better yet synthetic. Put in the first two quarts then start the engine, getting it up to temperature. While doing this have the oil tank cap off to make sure there is oil returning to the tank just inside the filler neck. The book says it holds 3 quarts, but it's usually about 2.5. After driving the level should be just at the lower dip stick mark. Add oil to this point.

My only motorcycle is a '72 750 Commando combat roadster.
 
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Gee David, you don't have ten bikes like everyone else? Sounds to me like you have some shopping to do! I think you need a big Ducati or Harley or BMW to ride when the Norton is down. And of course a few more Nortons :D

Thanks for posting the oil refill details. I'm learning things all the time on this forum.

Debby
 

Ron L

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David's instructions are spot on. My only caution is do not overfill the oiltank. Allow a few minutes of running with two quarts in the tank, shut it off, allow a couple minutes for the oil to settle in the tank, then check the level and add to the "L" level or slightly above. If you fill above the "H" level, you will have oil in your airfilter and blowing out the tank vent.
 

illf8ed

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more than one bike

Hi Debby,

Actually I had been with two motocycles until a bit earlier this year. I went through a '61 ES2, ' 74 John Player and an '83 BMW R100RS. The only keeper in the crowd is the '72 combat I've had since '97. In a way putting the fastback bodywork on it makes it two motorcycles, doesn't it?

Mine's all back together as a roadster - with all new fluids, grease, brakes...etc. Just need to time it, but it's not far off. The RITA ignition sure is easy to set up.
 

Anonymous

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Oil Change - Thanks!

David:

Exactly what I was hoping for, much appreciated. An experienced user's technique and tips are not available in the manual. You've saved me considerable time!

Ron:

No kidding!! When the motor was rebuilt earlier this year, the mechanic overfilled (probably double-filled) with oil and even after we removed a good quantity with a turkey baster, the motor sprayed oil out of the tank vent (& thru the airfilter) for the next 200 miles.

Cheers,

Howie
 

MichaelB

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Re: '72 oil change

My only motorcycle is a '72 750 Commando combat roadster.[/quote]

I salute you David C.
Owning a Norton has always meant having a spare M/C so one could always have one running, yet you are able to maintain it and be satisfied enough to keep it as your proprietary ride. Tough to do.
You have my respect.
 
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David,

I echo Mike's sentiments exactly!

Jason

PS - Howie: I have found that it is more accurate to check the engine oil with the bike on its side stand. Center stand oil readings tend to understate the oil level and, thus, folks tend to over fill the tank.
(Please don't tell nortonfan I said this, lest he go nuts!)
 
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Howie,

While looking after your oil you may want to check your oil pressure relief valve. Although all the documentation says you can ignore it, unless your case seams are spurting like a fountain, just yesterday I took mine apart to find that it was seized up solid. Even after a gentle heating to remove the screen, I had to pop it into a vice to get the plunger to budge, Once the plunger was free, washed and oiled it operated fine.

My experience has made me a firm believer that if you haven't checked (everything), you should. Unless the bike has been rebuilt by a reputable source, who knows what has been done, or not done in the last 35 or so years.

Can anyone clarify what the torque spec of 25lb is for. My assumption is it is the spec for the Dome nut to the valve, what would you use for the valve assembly into the timing cover?

Cheers,
Fastback
 
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Quote from Jason

"(Please don't tell nortonfan I said this, lest he go nuts!)"

Not sure y you made that statement Jason >??

If you check your oil while your bike is on the sidestand, well great ! As long as it works for you, that is what matters, isn't it ?

As far as draining the oil, it would have been good if Norton had put the oil tank on the other side of the bike. As it is on the "wrong" side, I put the bike on the centrestand, use a brick, place an empty/used oil container on the brick & have a funnel that, when inserted into the empty/used oil container, is just the right height to sit under the drain hole. That way you can walk away while it is draining. It is a good idea to do this when the engine oil is "hot' of course.

If you do the job on the sidestand, it would be much more awkward draining the oil, that's for certain. You will work it out I'm sure.

You seem to be aware of the "overfilling" problem already.
 
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I realise it may well be tad late to comment on this particular oil change... but I have an added input to 'chuck in...'

EDITED !!! :oops:

Further more, a mate (A Triumph owner) in Melbourne ( Australia ) who is proffessionally involved in mechanical and engineering maintainence of Diesel engines did a lot of ground work on oils, filter and the adaption of the same to his T120.
I benifited when he sent me a 'adaptor' which they machined up in their workshop which allows us to fit 'superior' ~ and MUCH cheaper than original ~ 'Fleetwood' oil filters, which are used in servicing of diesel engines.

(The same style of adaptor actually came up on E bay a while back , the link I don't seem to have saved.)
 

illf8ed

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priming the oil filter

Hi SSS,

I don't believe priming the oil filter will do anything with regard to big end pressure. The filter is in the return or scavenging circuit not in the supply to the crankshaft circuit. After a change of oil you can see within a second or two oil returning to the tank starting with a dry filter.
 
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'72 oil change

Howie,

Remove the seat & remove the two bolts holding the oil cover on. At the lower part of the oil tank is a drain bolt. Remove this while holding an empty milk jug with funnel to catch the oil. You can lean the bike toward that side to get more oil out. If you have an oil filter unscrew it with a basin under to catch the spillage then replace with a new filter. Last remove the drain plug at the bottom of the crankcase & drain into a catch basin...should be about half a cup of oil in there. Make sure all the drain plugs are in and tight with copper sealing washers. Replace either 20w50wt or 50wt oil or better yet synthetic. Put in the first two quarts then start the engine, getting it up to temperature. While doing this have the oil tank cap off to make sure there is oil returning to the tank just inside the filler neck. The book says it holds 3 quarts, but it's usually about 2.5. After driving the level should be just at the lower dip stick mark. Add oil to this point.

My only motorcycle is a '72 750 Commando combat roadster.
Thanks for the concise steps to the process. Since the ~1/2 cup of oil has been drained from the crankcase, should it be replaced before firing up the engine? Specifically, is there any danger starving the engine of oil at first start up after the oil change? I'm not sure how long it takes the new oil to flow from the tank to the engine, but it's not zero seconds. Any thoughts here would be much appreciated.
 
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'72 oil change

Howie,

Remove the seat & remove the two bolts holding the oil cover on. At the lower part of the oil tank is a drain bolt. Remove this while holding an empty milk jug with funnel to catch the oil. You can lean the bike toward that side to get more oil out. If you have an oil filter unscrew it with a basin under to catch the spillage then replace with a new filter. Last remove the drain plug at the bottom of the crankcase & drain into a catch basin...should be about half a cup of oil in there. Make sure all the drain plugs are in and tight with copper sealing washers. Replace either 20w50wt or 50wt oil or better yet synthetic. Put in the first two quarts then start the engine, getting it up to temperature. While doing this have the oil tank cap off to make sure there is oil returning to the tank just inside the filler neck. The book says it holds 3 quarts, but it's usually about 2.5. After driving the level should be just at the lower dip stick mark. Add oil to this point.

My only motorcycle is a '72 750 Commando combat roadster.
This is fantastic thankyou :D - I will be checking the current state of fluids in my Dad's 750 and changing them once I get it running, It has been in storage since 2006, and Mum tells me he got it running a few years ago but otherwise my knowledge of its current state is unknown, so this will be a great start to me confirming it either has or needs fluids before I try and add fuel, some angry wire pixies and have a go at kicking it over :)
 
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Thanks for the concise steps to the process. Since the ~1/2 cup of oil has been drained from the crankcase, should it be replaced before firing up the engine? Specifically, is there any danger starving the engine of oil at first start up after the oil change? I'm not sure how long it takes the new oil to flow from the tank to the engine, but it's not zero seconds. Any thoughts here would be much appreciated.
You know this thread is over 15 years old, no need to replace the 1/2 cup of oil in the crank case the oil pump will pump the oil around the motor straight away, but if the bike has been sitting for a long time might have to prime the oil pump, just fill the oil tank up and kick the oil through, but just a oil change no need to, draining the oil there will still be a bit of oil in the crank case, these bikes are a dry sump motor that's why they have a oil tank.

Ashley
 
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