1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Norton Race Parts

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by Fast Eddie, Jan 19, 2019.

  1. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
  2. Dommie Nator

    Dommie Nator VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    They are quite local to you Nigel. They were meant to turn up to the Norton Cafe Racer day at Cassington but didn't. Not sure why. Those tanks are way too expensive compared to TAB11 Classics, although they do look nice.
     
  3. mdt-son

    mdt-son

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2012
    Are Tab II's tanks manufactured with brazed filler necks? That may be one of the differences in quality. Of course design is another.

    -Knut
     
  4. madass140

    madass140 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2011
    no. with some epoxy
     
  5. Chris

    Chris VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Hi Eddie
    Piece written about this company in one of the mags recently. Late husband ran a bike business. His wife has taken it on MASSIVELY & gone online. My thoughts are it's a good source of care race items. She is very thorough & has covered e everything. Same as Disco Volante but if you know your way around you can find everything from good suppliers for at least 20% cheaper.
    Chris
     
  6. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Chris, I think you might be referring to ‘Chris Knight Motorcycles’ which is a different outfit.
     
  7. oldbeezer

    oldbeezer VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2017
    Per the Norton Race Parts site they use 2 mm aluminium
    "All of our NRP Norton Cafe Racer aluminium gas/petrol tanks & oil tanks are hand made in house using high quality 2mm aluminium."
    Per Tab2 they use 1.5 aluminium
    "All our tanks are handmade using time honoured techniques. All separate components are hand formed from 1.5mm thick sheet aluminium,"
    I am not sure what effect that will have on durability or cost but something to consider.
     
  8. mdt-son

    mdt-son

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2012
    1.5 vs. 2mm sheet alloy means less wear on press forming tools (I guess tanks are not entirely hand formed) and of course easier forming of the manually shaped parts, thus less time and money spent in prefab, less time for welding, etc. As Don (madass140) pointed out, Tab II tanks do not feature a brazed filler neck. That's another "saving", at the expense of the customer of course. Quality has a price.

    -Knut
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2019
  9. Chris

    Chris VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Hi Eddie

    Oops.
    Yep cods that one!
    Same reply, good stuff but
    Chris
     
  10. Danno

    Danno

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    I sent them an email about a part and shipping to the USA.
     
  11. acadian

    acadian VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    I was very interested in their Commando manx style oil tank kit, pricey, but looks to be a high quality kit. I've since decided that it would only be an aesthetic change (adding an oil cooler gave me some additional capacity), and one that's a bit too pricey for now
     
  12. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    I stumbled on them quite recently. Pretty good coverage of bits but as you say they can be a bit pricey. Was looking for alloy tank retaining
    straps, they have but not exactly as I wanted. Still looking for 40mm x3mm rubber with some elasticity.
     
  13. acadian

    acadian VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    FWIW, I cut up a bicycle inner tube for my manx tank retaining strap, does the job and dirt cheap
     
  14. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Thx dont have a push bike so I guess Ill have to go to the school yard and nick some kids ride....:)
     
  15. worntorn

    worntorn

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    It's generally a lot easier to build in 2 mm than in 1.5
    Most want an alloy tank for weight reduction.
    1.5 is obviously lighter but also much more difficult to weld, given welds must be high quality and leak free.
    The next alloy tank I build will be at 2 mm, the last one was at 1.5
    A little heavier but a lot easier and a bit more durable.

    If Tab is building them at 1.5 mm this probably means their weld quality is excellent, otherwise they would be plagued by leaks.
    Lighter doesn't mean less quality, in fact as with many mc or bicycle items, the lighter it is the more costly it is to produce.

    Glen
     
  16. gortnipper

    gortnipper VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    I have a Lyta style Tab2 tank, and the build.quality on mine is excellent. No leaks out of the box. The only criticism is that the fuel neck could have been a few mm higher for the Ceandess caps.
     
  17. mdt-son

    mdt-son

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2012
    You are comparing apples and oranges. Owning a racing bicycle I can tell you the lighter parts are usually of different alloys and other manufacturing processes (e.g, forging instead of casting), also better engineered (optimised) than the cheaper parts and sometimes more sophisticated. As price goes up, sale diminishes and price has to increase even more.

    As for welding - yes, thin sheets are sensible to heat influx but it's controllable using TIG and heat sinks. It's a matter of using the correct parameters and knowing the drill. Once set, welding 1.5mm is not more demanding than welding 2mm, and it is faster. For butt welds, friction stir welding is a very good process allowing welding of Al sheets down to 0.8 mm.

    -Knut
     
  18. worntorn

    worntorn

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Welding 1.5 Al is not more demanding than welding 2 al mm?
    You might want to fabricate some alloy tanks and put that theory to the test!

    Getting a uniform non porous weld with 2 mm Al. Sheet material is pretty high on the skill chart, 1.5 is much tougher.
    I've built in both and I'm going back to the 2mm. It's just easier all around.
    And the little bit of extra weight isn't going to matter with my bikes.
    Evan Wilcox also uses 2 mm due to ease of welding . There are a couple of other practical reasons as well. One is that after fairing the tank you thin the material considerably in places. Between the sanding the ewheeling , the 1.5 mm sheet may only be 1 mm in spots, especially near welds.
    Good luck trying to reweld that should a leak show up in that thin area. Welding al at 1.5 mm is difficult enough, at 1mm it becomes much more difficult again. It can be done, just as razor blades can be welded, but not by most welders!



    Glen
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
    baz and NKN like this.
  19. cjandme

    cjandme

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Their products look great, I had not seen or heard of them before - (admittedly my Norton is on hold at the moment and I'm riding a 1986 Yamaha SRX single) but thanks for posting Nigel.
     
  20. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    There are some nice looking alloy tanks and I like to replace my old worn out Wideline tank, they have some good prices on them but really you get what you pay for, quality cost money so paying good money for workmanship is better than buying cheap to fine out you been ripped off on the quality or having problems that need to be fixed, I think I will start to save me some money lol.

    Ashley
     

Share This Page