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Need more Tritons

Discussion in 'Triton' started by ashman, May 26, 2018.

  1. madass140

    madass140 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2011
    Al I built that bike over 30 years ago and never had any handling issues. I'm in regular contact with the current owner of the same bike
    and he has never mentioned any handling issues, but of course we are not experienced racers.
     
  2. madass140

    madass140 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2011
  3. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    The frame was made by a guy who used to work for the Triumph factory in England. In about 1948 he got a 12th on the IOM. That frame was slightly longer than a normal Featherbed, but similar in most other details. The handling thing being affected by the motor position is most noticeable in tight high-speed bends. I moved my motor forward an inch until the mounts touched. The handling was better, but was never as good as a 500cc Manx. You probably would not discover the deficiency during normal use of a road bike, unless you got into deep shit in a corner.
    I once rode my friend's racing Triton which has a genuine Manx frame with the Triumph motor that inch further back. It was still good but the light airy feeling in corners, did not inspire as much confidence. When you are on the limit with skinny tyres, a lot is about 'feel'. If the bike is positive in corners and tightens it's line under power, you can be far more aggressive - unless you have 100 horsepower.
    I don't believe in road race heroes, most of it is about the bikes they are riding. We all adjust to the handling of the bikes we ride.
     
  4. Matt Spencer

    Matt Spencer

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Theres a picture somewhere in the Aussie Classic Bike Rag , of the Sydney NSW from 800 cc 8n stud Dellorotto
    Twin Dunstall disc Triton ( Orange Now ) WITH THE RIDGID CHAINCASE POWERPLANT SPACING .

    This gets the Injun right down & low forward ,
    And the Gearbox up n aft at the swing arm spindle .

    So All 9.999 other Tritons are INCORRECT ! .

    P U Triumphs Generally , if arranged so the lower chaincase is something like horizontal ,
    The G'Box output shaft near level with the swing arm pivot , set the engine down & canted .

    Cording to a olde M C M , throw the Tri in the Norton Plates , and drill another ole ( AMC Trans )
    and youll get the injun canted nicely . Easy as that. Any twit should be able to do the front plates .

    This also avoids the hineous crme of the pipes low & wide under your hooves , the worst F up imaginable
    if your pretenting the renowned roadholding , youd be on your ear . Gronded .

    Folding Footrests arnt a bad Idea. Directly under the S/Arm pivot . Aft can induce bump steer . ( Bum Steer ? )
     
  5. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    The theory is an excellent motor in an excellent frame creates an excellent bike. No Triton is ever as good as a good Manx. And I love Tritons. That genuine ex-Ginger Molloy 1961 Manx I rode in 1973 would absolutely kill any Triton. ( I could have bought it for $1300 ) I could ride it around corners about 20 MPH faster, even though it was slightly slower down the straights. It is not the sum of the parts, but the whole package which makes a good bike.
     
  6. Matt Spencer

    Matt Spencer

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    [​IMG]

    = The Lap time of a seriously developed Manx in the I.o.M. at the first triout .

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    AND it Won the 68 production T.T. [​IMG]

    And It'd Obviously be FASTER with a TRIUMPH Engine .

    The T100 thingo of mine'd Equal a good ' built ' Manx on the puke a cooe short circuit . Had more left at 130 unstreamlined . Pity I didnt know what I had , at the time . Motorwise .
     

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