Installing a Sparx 3-phase alternator. I need some help!

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Coco--

I feel I owe you about a dozen beers or more, of your choice. Just let me know where to send them(!)....

I think we purchased our bikes at about the same time, and it appears we are embarking on very similar pathways on our respective machines. This, too, is my first time in vintage bike restoration. (I'm currently digging into the forks, and am readying for a total rewire).

Anyone: Simple question No. 1: is the basic Boyer electronic ignition not adequate? I know the three phase is considered ideal, but even though I won't be running tons of electrical stuff on the bike, is a three-phase still preferable? I ask because I bought the Boyer system a few months ago. I'd have no problem putting it on Ebay and selling it as a new item and would likely get most of my money back.

Back to you, Coco. I think we should make a pact that you always go first on these projects, as I can learn from any possible mistake you may make (and I'd be making in spades). I'll send you beer. You plow ahead, and document it all so I know what to do as well as what not to do. Fair enough? :wink: That being said, do you not have to get going on the forks as well?

Hang in there. Know also that I'm well in o'er my head already.....

wrench, soon to be removing all the wire on his bike.
 
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I found the Boyer fine on twins (Commando and A65) but crap in my Trident. I think this is quite common.
Trispark in Oz devoloped their ignition specifically for the triples but I don't think it's needed for most bikes. Just make sure your battery voltage is good as Boyer's are sensitive to voltage drops when starting.

An Odyssey battery made a big improvement to my Commando's electric leg, along with a four brush conversion to the starter motor.

I just fitted a Sparx 3 phase to mine but I don't really know if it was absolutely esential. I'm just getting more concerned about kicking it over wi a dodgey knee.
millard
 
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wrench said:
Coco--

I feel I owe you about a dozen beers or more, of your choice. Just let me know where to send them(!)....

I think we purchased our bikes at about the same time, and it appears we are embarking on very similar pathways on our respective machines. This, too, is my first time in vintage bike restoration. (I'm currently digging into the forks, and am readying for a total rewire).

Anyone: Simple question No. 1: is the basic Boyer electronic ignition not adequate? I know the three phase is considered ideal, but even though I won't be running tons of electrical stuff on the bike, is a three-phase still preferable? I ask because I bought the Boyer system a few months ago. I'd have no problem putting it on Ebay and selling it as a new item and would likely get most of my money back.

Back to you, Coco. I think we should make a pact that you always go first on these projects, as I can learn from any possible mistake you may make (and I'd be making in spades). I'll send you beer. You plow ahead, and document it all so I know what to do as well as what not to do. Fair enough? :wink: That being said, do you not have to get going on the forks as well?

Hang in there. Know also that I'm well in o'er my head already.....

wrench, soon to be removing all the wire on his bike.

Thanks Wrench. Too bad we live about 2500 miles apart or we could hash this crap out together. Over some beers of course :!:

I have not touched my forks yet although I should have first since I think I'll be able to tackle that no problem. I used to rebuil mountain bike suspension all the time back in my cycling days and the Norton forks look more simple and just a lot bigger. I'll get on them when my hubs are sent out to get my new wheels done. I figure I'll do my rear caliper rebuild at the same time as well.

I feel better about the old girl today. I was really geting discouraged, especially when my good friend is cleaning his bike after a ride while I look at a pile of old wires and pull what's left of my hair out.

Wrench, I'll be the guinnea pig so you can avoid all of my bad choices, but I might have to take you up on that beer offer. Fedex does ship up here to Canada. 8)
 
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millard said:
probably of no consolation whatsoever Coco, but wiring is the one job I dread, ever more so than gearboxes.
If you do have to go to an expert for help I wouldn't feel obliged to seek out a Brit bike "expert". The wiring on these should not be beyond the ken of any competent bike repair shop.
Don't let it get you down mate, keep it all in perspective. A bike shop will most likely have it sorted in a coupla hours even if it might take the likes of you and I a coupla days.
Once it's up and running you'll forget all this heartache and just revel in the joy of that beauty of an engine.
millard

Thanks Millard. I'm going to hold out a bit longer before I hand the task over to a pro. The only wiring I've done before is put a CD player in the car and soldered in a few new capacitors in an old guitar amp. Although simple in comparasin to an automobile, this Commando wiring harness, and the mess the previous owner left the wiring in has me scratching my head.
 
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Thanks millard. I'll probably just go the simple route on this one as long as it works okay.

millard said:
Just make sure your battery voltage is good as Boyer's are sensitive to voltage drops when starting.

An Odyssey battery made a big improvement to my Commando's electric leg....

Pulled my battery out the other day. Huge and heavy. Champion is the make. Wondering how to lighten the load and keep the voltage stable. Will check into the Odyssey pronto.

Thanks for the help!

wrench
 
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Coco said:
Thanks Wrench. Too bad we live about 2500 miles apart or we could hash this crap out together. Over some beers of course :!:

Heck, distance is no deterrent. We'll keep hashing it out on our bikes. Next time that bike kicks you in the arse you just say, "Holy smokes, I gots me a dummy in PA who will send me some beer for my troubles. Why am I getting pissed off? This is a good thing."

I'll get on them when my hubs are sent out to get my new wheels done.
.

I'm quite jealous there. My wheels are just ugly. Some clown painted the steel spokes with aluminum paint, which of course is flaking off on about 50% of them.

I feel better about the old girl today. I was really geting discouraged, especially when my good friend is cleaning his bike after a ride while I look at a pile of old wires and pull what's left of my hair out.

Totally understandable. Maybe spend $500 and buy a piece of crap bike just to get moving while you are working on the Norton? I have a back-up bike that at least gets me on two wheels. Here, I think you should buy this to get you by for the next few weeks:

http://tinyurl.com/3a82u7

Be sure and click on the picture for a more detailed view. FUN!

Wrench, I'll be the guinnea pig so you can avoid all of my bad choices, but I might have to take you up on that beer offer. Fedex does ship up here to Canada. 8)

Deal. But just to make you feel better, I'll be the guinnea pig from time to time as well. Give and take. And beer, of course. :p

wrench
 
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wrench said:
I'm quite jealous there. My wheels are just ugly. Some clown painted the steel spokes with aluminum paint, which of course is flaking off on about 50% of them.

Here, I think you should buy this to get you by for the next few weeks:

http://tinyurl.com/3a82u7

Be sure and click on the picture for a more detailed view. FUN!


wrench

Nice.
 
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Latest on undersize Sparx rotors'

The first Sparx rotors were tight on the crankshaft. This was corrected by both of the US distributors. One uses a Sunnen hone and the other reams to enlarge the hole. This should not be a problem! Current production just hitting the dealers shelves have the hole sized correctly by the manufacturer in China.
 
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kommando said:
Latest on undersize Sparx rotors'

The first Sparx rotors were tight on the crankshaft. This was corrected by both of the US distributors. One uses a Sunnen hone and the other reams to enlarge the hole. This should not be a problem! Current production just hitting the dealers shelves have the hole sized correctly by the manufacturer in China.

The one I bought a few months back but recently installed (alternator, stator and rotor went on easily) went on with out a hitch.

If I could only figure out the previously botched wiring and Lucas electronic ignition install I'd be pumped.
 

maylar

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kommando said:
Latest on undersize Sparx rotors'

The first Sparx rotors were tight on the crankshaft. This was corrected by both of the US distributors. One uses a Sunnen hone and the other reams to enlarge the hole. This should not be a problem! Current production just hitting the dealers shelves have the hole sized correctly by the manufacturer in China.

I just attempted to install a 3-phase system yesterday on my '74 and the rotor won't fit. :cry: Bought it last Summer. I wonder if Sparx will give me one that fits?
 
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millard said:
my rotor was fine, it was the stator that didn't fit.
millard

Make sure you guys have 0.010 clearance all the way 'round between rotor and stator. I learned how critical this was the hard (and expensive)way!!
 
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tpeever said:
millard said:
my rotor was fine, it was the stator that didn't fit.
millard

Make sure you guys have 0.010 clearance all the way 'round between rotor and stator. I learned how critical this was the hard (and expensive)way!!

To do that I had to mount the outrigger plate in the lathe and skim a wee bit off the three locating points so I could get the stator in. Also had to open up the mounting holes in the laminated stator plates to get a wee bit of adjustment for the clearance between rotor and stator.
millard
 
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