1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Inner tubes

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by scotnort75, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. scotnort75

    scotnort75

    Joined:
    May 26, 2016
    Called Michelin and talked to someone in Europe who told me the 4mm tubes where good for
    on and off road.
    After hanging up the phone, I realized I hadn’t asked about shelf life, so I called back and this time I talked to someone in North America.
    He told me the 4mm tubes where rated for off road and would get warmer than a regular tube
    if I used them on road.
    He suggested, I go with on road Michelin 19MF 1466 inner tubes but couldn’t answer my
    question on shelf life.
    So, don’t know who to believe and therefore exchanged the 4mm for a set of 19MF 1466.

    Thanks to everyone for your input.

    Cheers.
     
  2. CanukNortonNut

    CanukNortonNut

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    I have put many miles on my Michelin tubes and changed out numerous Avon Am26 skins always using the Airstop Butyl 19MF inner tubes. IMHO shelf life is not an issue when they are inside the tire. Don't pinch the tube while changing the tire onto the rim:oops: Use the thicker tire spoons like these:
    https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-details/14856/tyre-lever-set-3-pieces-06-5751-55-0155-nmltu07-
    and keep a small amount of air in just to slightly inflate the inner tube while using the irons.
    Cheers,
    Thomas
     
    Nater_Potater likes this.
  3. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    When running without the bead rim lock device installed, is anyone putting something in/over the hole in rim for the device stud? I just left mine open with only the rim rim tape rubber between inner tube and hole. Seems to be holding up, but I can see the rim tape bulging a bit into the hole.
     
  4. Torontonian

    Torontonian

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Bulging is not so good.
    Make sure the hole has no rough lips or edges , smooth it out if so .
    I glued in place a square of inner tube on the inside to stop any bulging or chafing.
    Then the rim tape , then the final tube fitting.
    Never liked the rim lock retainer thingy.
    Concours shows competition would require it in place one would think.
     
    Tornado likes this.
  5. Steves

    Steves

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    When you are saying shelf life do you mean actually in a box on a shelf or inside a tyre on a bike? If the former probably years. If the latter they say you should change it with every tyre change, personally I keep an inner going for two tyres, (rear tyre anyway). It is usually the valve that starts to look a bit dodgy rather than the tube. Plus one on Mitchelin butyl
     
  6. CanukNortonNut

    CanukNortonNut

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    I don't buy that! IMHO I inspect my inner tubes every time I change my tires on and off the wheel rims. Unless they show any signs or issues it goes back in and continues to run again. I replace my tires once or twice a year on the rear with the Avon Universals when I wear them down to the wear bars. I am not going to drop $30 bucks more for a perfectly good tube and replace it with a new one just for twice tire change.o_O No way. I am not that rich. If I pinch the tube because of the incorrect tire iron (which I have done) :mad: I will not patch it but replace it. Patching is done if I get a nail or screw to get me home from a rally. If its good and seals without loosing air it stays.
    Cheers,
    Thomas
     
  7. htown16

    htown16 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    I put a bolt in the rim lock hole. It's a stainless and has a tapered head with a smooth top and phillips drive and also use a stainless nut and washer. I get them at the local hardware. You don't want anything with a sharp edge.
     
  8. Steves

    Steves

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    I should have mentioned ‘they’ as being the manufacturers. They got to make money and worry about product liability. Anyway I use TT100’s as I can get them half the price of Avon’s so money does come into it for me also. It’s just a personal thing, two tyre cycles and I change the inner. They often still look good but you only see them once a year, maybe 2 or 3 years for the front. Shame to take risks for a (relative) ha’porth of tar, purely my view of course and each to their own.
     
  9. eskasteve

    eskasteve VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    Not changing tubes when changing tires is false economy. I have gone down because of a blowout at speed. $30 would have been very cheap compared to the damage done. Left side of the bike got all ground up. It was 15 years ago but still cost around $1000 to put the bike back to perfect. Was it caused by reusing an old tube? I don't know but I will never ever take that chance again.
     
  10. CanukNortonNut

    CanukNortonNut

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Was that with a Michelin Airstop Butyl 19MF inner tubes or something from china?
    Curious? ...there would be your false economy if it was the later.
    Tom
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  11. xbacksideslider

    xbacksideslider VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    I've re-used twenty year old tubes BUT they were always inside a tire, inflated, for that entire term. They do not seem to deteriorate when isolated from ozone and sunlight. Their construction quality - made in UK, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, or USA, appears to exceed that of contemporary Chinese price point stuff. I have no recent experience with high quality tubes of European or Japanese manufacture.

    I've opened NOS (new/old stock) boxes to find the tubes inside useless, cracked at their folds, not even good to make rubber bands. Maybe if the boxes had been sealed in cellophane or shrink wrap?

    Before horsepower went up, back when all fast bikes had light wheels and lightness was what the market demanded, the tire companies competed on that basis. Those tubes were of higher quality construction, less seams and such. Today's rubber chemistry likely is better though.
     
    Nater_Potater and CanukNortonNut like this.
  12. CanukNortonNut

    CanukNortonNut

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    +1 Thank you. ditto.
    Here is the kicker... the glorious world of next Tuesday defined:
    The tire pressure tell all. If the tire is inflated to 32 psi on Tuesday and next Tuesday it shows 10# less. You don't want that tube in your bike.
    Cheers,
    Thomas
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  13. eskasteve

    eskasteve VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    It was an Avon tube. Where it was made I don't remember. I do use the Michelins now exclusively. I still change them whenever I replace my tires. It's the price of admission in my book even though I know that not everybody agrees.
     
  14. SteveA

    SteveA VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Is this a political comment? Or just anti porcelain?

    ;-)
     
    Nater_Potater and Fast Eddie like this.
  15. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Not dishwasher proof...
     
  16. CanukNortonNut

    CanukNortonNut

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Lets just say their manufacturing practices and material selection on many types of products have much to be desired. It may look the same but doesn't preform the same.:(
    I have yet to find a tube that can keep air in it. I avoid these items like the plague.
    Nothing political.
    Cheers,
    Thomas
     
  17. Fanfan26

    Fanfan26

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    + 1 for the made in china.
     
  18. bsaboss

    bsaboss VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    A few years ago I had a flat in the rear tyre due to the rim tape and tube perishing adjacent to the hole left when I didn't refit the rim lock. Since then I've used plastic bungs made specifically to fill such holes (eBay item no 331537743822). No worries since and as they bungs weigh almost nothing they don't upset the wheel's balance.
     
    Tornado likes this.
  19. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Can these be installed without needing to remove the tire (but deflated if needed)? Trying to minimize the pain....
     
  20. bsaboss

    bsaboss VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    You would need to beak the bead and then depending on how small your hands/fingers are you can push the tyre down far enough to get it in. It's a fiddle, but doable.