I suddenly feel very old

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Apr 13, 2021
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Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan
 
The BSA Owners club had a show recently in Upper Hutt. Sounds like they had a much broader range of bikes than you describe. More targeted at the Classic clubs. There were some extremely nice machines there including a Veterans class. I was lucky enough to get 3rd prize in the British section but honestly feel I was a bit lucky. I think because it was organised by the BSA club they purposely selected prize winners other than BSAs because there were some extremely nice Gold Stars and BSA twins on show. Here are some photos.
 

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Modern motorcycles also usually resemble the race bikes of their day. If I take my Seeley 850 to a race meetings, the young guys usually come and go all over it. One of my mates said 'at least your bike looks right'. What he does not realise is that my bike could not be built in any other way and still be reasonably functional. Anything a fraction out of place would make it unworkable. There are very few degrees of freedom. When I built it, I put a lot of thought into it. I have got a fair idea about what works and what doesn't.
 
Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan
That's our reward for doing it right. As motorcycle ENTHUSIASTS, the burning embers have stayed 50+ years, while flash in the pan passing interest latest new distraction have gone along.
 
Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan

This perspective that you describe hit me about 10 years ago, and so I guess that makes me an older fart.
 
The BSA Owners club had a show recently in Upper Hutt. Sounds like they had a much broader range of bikes than you describe. More targeted at the Classic clubs. There were some extremely nice machines there including a Veterans class. I was lucky enough to get 3rd prize in the British section but honestly feel I was a bit lucky. I think because it was organised by the BSA club they purposely selected prize winners other than BSAs because there were some extremely nice Gold Stars and BSA twins on show. Here are some photos.
Love that orange A65. Is it my eyes or does it say "650 Frightning" on the side panelo_O? :D :D :D :D
 
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Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan
I don't think you're "old" simply because you don't think you fit with the current"scene".

But, then again, if you believe you're old, then you are.
Channel Burt Munro!!
 
Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan
Fun read. Well written.
 
Love that orange A65. Is it my eyes or does it say "650 Frightning" on the side panelo_O? :D :D :D :D
It sure does.

I really liked this bike too and would have placed it ahead of mine in the rankings. Looked like a nice fun bike.
 
About getting old - during my life, I have learned two things - the system runs on bullshit, and if you have a victim's mindset, you will be a victim. I am 80, however in my mind, I am only 29. That is the age at which I started road racing. The only thing which makes me feel old, is when my friends die, and leave me behind to think about them. It is really strange - the last time I raced. I was about 73 and I rode better than ever. Perhaps you become more competent as you age ? My problem is I am always thinking. Some people seem to worry about their image.
I was at Winton Raceway a few years ago. There was an old guy there who was helping with a Mamx. I asked him about the bike. It turned out, he was Eric Hinton. He must have been in his late 90s - still bright and alert and interested in motorcycles. He and his father actually had the keys to the Norton factory when they raced in Europe in the 1950s. He still had Eric Hinton senior's work's Manx.
 
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Hi all,
Today I took my Mk2 for a gallop down to the Bombala Bike Show in southern NSW, Bombala being the closest larger town to our village of Delegate. Its been quite some years since I have attended the show. I was glad to support the local show and I know money raised goes to a good cause. It’s a short 50km run for me and i went with a mate who rode his whizz bang 1000cc Aprilia. I played follow the leader and fortunately he kept his speed below 90 mph which meant I could keep up without substantially exceeding 5000 rpm which is about as high I like to rev my bike for sustained periods.
After paying the entry I rode up onto the oval and parked next to a sign announcing ‘British Bikes’. There was only two other in that category , one an immaculate customised T140 and the other, a relatively modern Triumph R3. No other Norton, BSA etc in sight.
The vast majority of bikes were the ubiquitous parts bin engineered Harleys, a collection of very striking but off the shelf modern Indians and a heap of show bikes pushed off their trailers which I would deem as unridable on conventional roads. Yes there endless death‘s motifs, gold plated skulls emblems and intricate custom paint jobs. One had a pair of Colt 45s painted on the tank with the shibboleth, ‘God judges but I’m the shooter’ underneath. I’m sure the owner of the bike is the most law abiding person who has never shot anything bigger than an air rifle and wouldn’t hurt a fly.
Now yes, all very interesting to some and perhaps the owners may well feel there incredibly expensive bikes are an expression of or perhaps even an extension of their inner selves but frankly, after a life time of riding old pommie iron, I really had the impression that I had seen it all before. There were massive trikes, with VW motors, some even with V8s. There was custom cruisers with barely enough ground clearance to be rideable and a rat bike section that didn’t look particularly ratty to me, just a modern bike in excellent condition with a few oddball bits stuck on them. There were desperate attempts by manufacturers to give there cruisers classic looks with valanced guards, running boards and foot clutches but still with a liquid crystal diode instrument display. I just wondered, what was the point!
To my mind, by far the most interesting bike (modesty forbids me to say my Commando) was an immaculate and very original Honda 750/4.
My mate noted that actually my Commando, even although it was demonstrably overshadowed by the cacophony of bling, chrome, gold plate and custom mural paint jobs on other bikes, actually attracted more attention than any other bike there. Obviously amongst some there is still some vague collective memory of what a desirable bike once was! Of course no way my bike could win a prize in that competition. Yes I gave it a cursory wash before taking it down but general use on miles of gravel roads means it can never match the brilliance of other bikes that a real show ponies.
I sudden found myself feeling very old. Unlike the majority of other attendees, I don’t have dingle dangles all over my jacket, I don’t have custom boots and I certainly don’t try to look like a 1%er. I guess I’m just no longer ‘in the scene’.
So there was nothing for it but to ride back to my local hotel in Delegate for a few quiet beers. It seemed so different from the fun I used to have at bike club dos 40 years ago with bonfires, drinking, bands and burnouts. I’m now just an old fart.
The highlight of the day was halfway home we swapped bikes and I rode the Aprilia. Wow, biking has come a long way. With 160hp on tap it was a huge amount of fun. As my mate kindly said as he got off the Commando was, ‘I can really see why everyone wanted one of these when they when they were new’.
regards all
Alan
Absolutely relate to your comments, starting out riding 45+ years ago on a Brit bike, I sort of cringe when I see 'some' of the new fully tassled HD crowd with their I've been everywhere patches wobbling down the road (no offence intended to HD owners / riders that buy them & use them for what they are intended for )
 
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I am old school in everything I do and while on the bikes, I can't believe how much money these Harley rider spend to look bad arse or look like a 1% and then you get the boy racers who dress in riding gear that most moto 1 races wear, just give me an old worn leather jacket, open face helmet, black Levi pants and decent work boots, no gloves as I hate wearing them, but we still get well set and run bike shows that draw big crowds but of course were restricted when the virus hit us, but when out on my old and well-worn Norton it's a show of it's own, if riding along on a duel road I am always getting these junior on the rice rockets coming up along side of me giving me the thumbs up or the usual Harley rider gives me the evil look trying to be cool or bad arse who knows, when I brought my new 2013 Triumph Thruxton when I picked it up the sales manager said to his side kick, look old school, but that's the way I like it, in 50 years of riding I have only had 2 leather jackets, but the last few years with our hot summers I did buy a vented jacket, better to wear than no protection but I do like to wear my old well used leather jacket, but nothing has changed much for me in 50 years of riding I still ride with my mates I been riding with for as long but a lot of them have lost the old school stuff and have their fancy phones mounted on the handle bars and instead of sitting down chatting they be trying to sink their phone so they can chat to each other while riding, isn't that what's the next stop is all about, sitting down having a good gas bag.
Yes times have change, but with me nothing has changed, I love my old school looks and habits, but I no longer go too to many bike shows, yes I like looking at bikes but it's more selling all these up market things that bikers like to part their money on to put on their jackets and the Harley riders with every finger covered in silver rings so they look bad arse and their women buying all the accessories with Harley Davidson all over it, no thanks I am old school and proud of it, I just enjoy riding whether it's my old 46+ year Norton or my modern 2016 Thruxton I don't need all the accessories and gadgets that most think they need, I just ride with a smile on my dial.

Ashley
 
Many people are old when they are 40, If you stop learning, you almost immediately get old. Motorcycles and kids keep you younger. It is all in the mind. A victim's mindset can be very bad.
In Australia kids go to university to get a better job. To me that is a very poor reason. If you work for money in a job which does not genuinely interest you, you can get old very quickly
 
IMO, getting old "gracefully" is mostly about having good genes AND some luck. I figure anybody that tells me they are better at doing anything physical in their later years than they did in their twenties has some memory issues. :rolleyes:

OTOH, at 60 you should be a lot smarter than you were at 25 which, in certain activities might make you "better." But since I don't know of any 60 year old motorcycle champions, riding a motorcycle doesn't appear to be one of those activities. ;)
 
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