Gearbox Lockring Socket

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Gearbox Lockring Socket.
I'm getting ready to pull the inner case and am trying to decide if I should buy the tool from Old Britts, the part # OB-76603 is listed at the bottom of the tool page or try and make one. I've got two more gearboxes that I will, somewhere in the future, tear into and will need the same tool. OR, do I need this tool?
Mick Hemmings DVD's gearbox teardown showed a different tool from Old Britts, and in swooshdaves gearbox teardown I did not see the use of the tool. I like having the right tool for the job, no excuse for a buggered up part. I also don't want to spend $85 if there is a good alternative.
Thanks!
Kurt
 
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kwb210 said:
Gearbox Lockring Socket.
I'm getting ready to pull the inner case and am trying to decide if I should buy the tool from Old Britts, the part # OB-76603 is listed at the bottom of the tool page or try and make one. I've got two more gearboxes that I will, somewhere in the future, tear into and will need the same tool. OR, do I need this tool?
Mick Hemmings DVD's gearbox teardown showed a different tool from Old Britts, and in swooshdaves gearbox teardown I did not see the use of the tool. I like having the right tool for the job, no excuse for a buggered up part. I also don't want to spend $85 if there is a good alternative.
Thanks!
Kurt

I just banged it tight with a punch. If you do it right you shouldn't leave a mark.
 
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swooshdave said:
kwb210 said:
Gearbox Lockring Socket.
I'm getting ready to pull the inner case and am trying to decide if I should buy the tool from Old Britts, the part # OB-76603 is listed at the bottom of the tool page or try and make one. I've got two more gearboxes that I will, somewhere in the future, tear into and will need the same tool. OR, do I need this tool?
Mick Hemmings DVD's gearbox teardown showed a different tool from Old Britts, and in swooshdaves gearbox teardown I did not see the use of the tool. I like having the right tool for the job, no excuse for a buggered up part. I also don't want to spend $85 if there is a good alternative.
Thanks!
Kurt

I just banged it tight with a punch. If you do it right you shouldn't leave a mark.

Is there any torque setting that is important? Important is probably the wrong word, good and snug? Is it something that could loosen up? Hope that comment doesn't cause yu nightmares!
kurt
 
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I would think that the proper size piece of pipe could be cut and ground with little trouble. Drill a hole through the end cross wise for a large screw driver to put through for a lever. I find making tools very satisfying. It just add to the pride of Norton ownership.
 
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Make it! It's much more fun than paying a credit card bill. Old Britts says to use a 1 1/2 inch pipe.
 
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Anglophile said:
Make it! It's much more fun than paying a credit card bill. Old Britts says to use a 1 1/2 inch pipe.

1 1/2 inch is the diameter, i did make the measurement and looked half heartedly for a pipe in my garage. I should head to the hardware store at lunch and pickup a short piece from the plumbing section. Heck, if I mess up on one end...I'll just turn it around and have another go at it! And the simple idea of drilling a hole to insert a screwdriver, good one and also the hole in which it will hang from the workbench!
I'll keep you all posted. Thanks for the usual quick and in-sightful comments.
kurt
 

DogT

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I made one out of 1 1/2" black pipe. Used a hacksaw and file. I would have no worries about using a punch on it either, Mick does that in his DVD.

Gearbox Lockring Socket


Dave
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You also need a good assortment of ball-peen hammers for proper torqueing of things like the three nuts that hold the cylinder to the head. When asked what the main difference was when he abandoned his Norton and started flattracking a Harley was, "Well, I had to get some bigger hammers."
 
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kwb210 said:
Is there any torque setting that is important? Important is probably the wrong word, good and snug? Is it something that could loosen up? Hope that comment doesn't cause yu nightmares!
kurt
I looked at a few torque lists and see nothing about the locking ring. If you are worried, a dab of blue locktite may help you sleep better. The real issue is making sure the actuator lines up with the cable hole on the outer cover.
 
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pvisseriii said:
kwb210 said:
Is there any torque setting that is important? Important is probably the wrong word, good and snug? Is it something that could loosen up? Hope that comment doesn't cause yu nightmares!
kurt
I looked at a few torque lists and see nothing about the locking ring. If you are worried, a dab of blue locktite may help you sleep better. The real issue is making sure the actuator lines up with the cable hole on the outer cover.

Which is why a few taps with a hammer and you're good to go.
 
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DogT said:
I made one out of 1 1/2" black pipe. Used a hacksaw and file. I would have no worries about using a punch on it either, Mick does that in his DVD.

Gearbox Lockring Socket


Dave
69S

Is the 1 1/2 inch the inside diameter of the pipe? Asking because pipe at hardware store was 1 1/2 inside and 1 7/8 outside.
kurt
 

DogT

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Mine measures 1.67 OD and 1.36 ID roughly. I'm not sure what the 1 1/2" refers to other than a generic pipe size. The nut measures about 1.37 ID.

Dave
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I just popped mine last week. Used a flat punch, and a copper mallet. Lined up, gave it a 'fairly' light 'experimental' tap, as I, too, didn't want to mess anything up. However, it was that very first 'fairly' light tap that did it. I had movement, and from there simply backed it off by hand.

Someone above asked, as I will seeing I didn't catch a reply: is there a torque setting when I re-fit? I can't find anything in print, and it sure did seem much easier than I had expected.

By the way, I seriously like the hacksaw approach. Simple, easy... elegant! :D
 
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Gary said:
I just popped mine last week. Used a flat punch, and a copper mallet. Lined up, gave it a 'fairly' light 'experimental' tap, as I, too, didn't want to mess anything up. However, it was that very first 'fairly' light tap that did it. I had movement, and from there simply backed it off by hand.

Someone above asked, as I will seeing I didn't catch a reply: is there a torque setting when I re-fit? I can't find anything in print, and it sure did seem much easier than I had expected.

By the way, I seriously like the hacksaw approach. Simple, easy... elegant! :D

Tight enough so it doesn't back off? You're getting some pulling action from the clutch actuator and pushing from the push rod action, but there isn't any other strain.
 
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Remember, measurements of the INSIDE of a pipe with a micrometer are always a little off since the blades are flat and the surface you are measuring is round. Then there is the reality that pipes are not made to the same standards as our parts. Well, usually (let's not get into that now).

Here is the best answer I found on the net:

"The DN code is a code that rounds off the diameter of the pipe to get an even number to work with, not the exact diameter. The American version is called NPS and is in english units. DN is the european version and is based on millimeters. For example, If you want 2" Pipe, NPS calls it 2" and DN calls it 50 mm. but the actual outside diameter is neither 2" or 50 mm. They just use these nice round numbers cause it is easier.

Finding the inside diameter is even more complicated. If you have 2" pipe, the inside diameter will vary dependeing on how strong the pipe needs to be. For example, 2" sch 80 pipe has thicker walls and therefore a smaller inside diameter than 2" Sch 40 pipe. The outside diameter of these pipes are the same so that you can use the same fittings on each.

You must remember that people have been produced steel pipe for about 150 years. The Pipe sizes that we use today in pvc and galvanized were originally designed years ago for steel pipe. The number system, like Sch 40, 80, 160, were set long ago and seem a little odd. For example, Sch 1120 pipe is even thinner than Sch 40, but same OD. And while these pipes are based on old steel pipe sizes, there is other pipe, like gold-flow cpvc for heated water, that uses pipe sizes, inside and out, based on old copper pipe size standards insteasd of steel. "
 

rvich

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1-1/2 inch pipe is actually a lot closer to 2" OD. The Old Britts article should ask for 1-1/4 pipe. I made the tool out of 1-1/2 found it too large and set it aside. It turned out to work perfectly on the lock ring on the rear hub!

Russ
 
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regarding torque on this lockring...

If you haven't already removed it, mark it so as to remember how far it was tightened when you removed it, then just tighten it back to the same point. IIRC, it doesn't experience too much load. I would be extra careful using locktite near the mainshaft bearing behind it, however.

Jeff
 
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