weight of 750 engine

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who can tell me the approx weight of the commando 750 engine? I might have a lead on an engine but with the distance I would have to have it shipped. I think UPS has a 150lb limit.
thanks!
kurt
 
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I'm not sure of the weight but I had a complete 750 engine shipped via UPS this spring.
 
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what kind of packaging did you use? I was thinking of a rubbermaid plastic tote, sized for the eninge of course, wrap engine in something shock absorbing, still thinking about that, and then put the tote inside a carboard box like a traditional shipping container. other ideas?
 
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My shipper must have had a table saw because he built a 3/4" plywood box that it fit skin tight in. He lowered the bottom slightly ahead of the top and then screwed the top head mount into the side of the plywood box. It worked but I would have made it a couple inches bigger all round and lined the box with 1" dense styrofoam panel. The box was all screwed together and he even put metal fold out handles on it. The shippers must of loved it.

I've shipped a lot of equally heavy stuff too. Wrap the engine in a plastic bag(to keep styro out of the fins etc) then drop into a double or triple thick cardboard box that is just big enough to fit the engine and pack it very tight with styro popcorn (peanuts) and tape it shut. Place 2-3" styro peanuts in the bottom of a second heavy box and lay your inner box in. Now pack it all around with more styro peanuts pack in so tight the box bulges. You have to force as much styro in as possible or else the inner box will move around and that allows the styro to get crushed and compressed. Be prepared to spend the cash on a 6' high bag of styro and pack it really tight always. Appliance store will give you triplex boxes from friges and washing machines etc. Always pack styro so tight the boxes bulge and your parts don't move inside. Outer box should be 2-3" bigger all around minimum.

The trouble and expense you go to is nothing compared to what you have to do to fix a broken fin etc.
 
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Rennie,

The best way is to make sure nothing moves, peanuts are really not the way to go, they crush too easily. Your shipper had the right idea, make a box out of thick plywood and bolt the engine to the box to make sure it does not move. I have seen a lot of things shipped and heavy stuff is ALWAYS bolted to something solid (and the stuff I saw shipped was handled with utmost care because it was worth a lot of money, like close to a million)

Jean
 
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I saw this done on a simalar type engine & they had used light gage metal angle like 18 Gage or close to it to build a square frame with cross pieces to bolt in the motor & diagonal pieces for braces. I can't remember but I think it had a wood top & bottom. Might be lighter than all wood. Check some engine builders web sites for pictures to get ideas. Colorado Norton Works has a few pictures of the metal box he sends you for pick up & return shipping. Looking at It might give you a good idea.
 
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who can tell me the approx weight of the commando 750 engine? I might have a lead on an engine but with the distance I would have to have it shipped. I think UPS has a 150lb limit.
92lbs I recall with no carbs or inlets
 
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Jeandr said:
Rennie,

The best way is to make sure nothing moves, peanuts are really not the way to go, they crush too easily. Your shipper had the right idea, make a box out of thick plywood and bolt the engine to the box to make sure it does not move. I have seen a lot of things shipped and heavy stuff is ALWAYS bolted to something solid (and the stuff I saw shipped was handled with utmost care because it was worth a lot of money, like close to a million)

Jean
I agree to a degree. The problem with the one I had shipped to me that was bolted to plywood was UPS managed to handle it roughly enough to break the secured mount free and the tack drive on the side of the engine was broken off and the box was starting to come apart. That is why I thought I'd do the same BUT use high density styro panels to line the inside of the box.

I agree that styro peanuts will crush but if you use the 2 box method they seem to hold up with the weight distributed evenly over a large area. I've shipped many many 100 -120 lb video monitors, decks and related equipment ($10-20,000.00 value) as far as Taiwan using this method and never had problems. I've received the same equipment smashed to bits using other methods. If packed tightly the styro peanuts seem to stand up when the weight is distributed evenly between an inner and outer box. This method is easily done by anyone with easily obtained materials and is why I suggested it. I once had a recipient complain that I had over packed an expensive HD monitor saying they could have dropped it out the cargo door of the plane onto thee tarmac and it wouldn't have hurt it. I replied saying "they probably did"

Another way is to use 1"X2'X8" styro sheets on edge and cut to fit the contour of the item and then remove the item and glue the sheets together, let glue harden, seal and ship. This method is more time consuming but better for something like a Norton engine. It's the next best thing to injection moulded foam packing and will take the weight easily.
 
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Keith1069 said:
who can tell me the approx weight of the commando 750 engine? I might have a lead on an engine but with the distance I would have to have it shipped. I think UPS has a 150lb limit.
92lbs I recall with no carbs or inlets
How many of us have installed one of these into the frame single handedly?
 
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RennieK said:
Keith1069 said:
who can tell me the approx weight of the commando 750 engine? I might have a lead on an engine but with the distance I would have to have it shipped. I think UPS has a 150lb limit.
92lbs I recall with no carbs or inlets
How many of us have installed one of these into the frame single handedly?

I did and with a bum shoulder too :cry:

Jean
 
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RennieK said:
Jeandr said:
Rennie,

The best way is to make sure nothing moves, peanuts are really not the way to go, they crush too easily. Your shipper had the right idea, make a box out of thick plywood and bolt the engine to the box to make sure it does not move. I have seen a lot of things shipped and heavy stuff is ALWAYS bolted to something solid (and the stuff I saw shipped was handled with utmost care because it was worth a lot of money, like close to a million)

Jean
I agree to a degree. The problem with the one I had shipped to me that was bolted to plywood was UPS managed to handle it roughly enough to break the secured mount free and the tack drive on the side of the engine was broken off and the box was starting to come apart. That is why I thought I'd do the same BUT use high density styro panels to line the inside of the box.

I agree that styro peanuts will crush but if you use the 2 box method they seem to hold up with the weight distributed evenly over a large area. I've shipped many many 100 -120 lb video monitors, decks and related equipment ($10-20,000.00 value) as far as Taiwan using this method and never had problems. I've received the same equipment smashed to bits using other methods. If packed tightly the styro peanuts seem to stand up when the weight is distributed evenly between an inner and outer box. This method is easily done by anyone with easily obtained materials and is why I suggested it. I once had a recipient complain that I had over packed an expensive HD monitor saying they could have dropped it out the cargo door of the plane onto thee tarmac and it wouldn't have hurt it. I replied saying "they probably did"

Another way is to use 1"X2'X8" styro sheets on edge and cut to fit the contour of the item and then remove the item and glue the sheets together, let glue harden, seal and ship. This method is more time consuming but better for something like a Norton engine. It's the next best thing to injection moulded foam packing and will take the weight easily.

My feeling is that something with a large surface (like a monitor) and heavy can be OK with peanuts, but a concentrated weight with angles won't fare so well. Also, a cardboard box without any hadles WILL get thrown, kicked, rolled... Atleast with a wooden box, handles can be screwed or bolted on which will facilitate moving the package. All of the big packages I talked about had the part bolted to a plywood base with a high density foam "insulator" with another plywood sheet under it, overkill for an engine, but something to think about if it's unobtanium :lol:

I do agree, "molding" styrofoam around the engine would work a lot better, usually that stuff has a higher density than peanuts and would not move around inside a heavy triple thick cardboard box.

Jean
 

grandpaul

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I've shipped at least a half dozen engines in Rubbermaid tubs with a piece of 1/4" plywood in the bottom and stiff cardboard and/or foam packing (tightly) all the way around. Drill and zip tie the top. I also send loads of parts to polishing like this.

FedEx regular ground has proven cheaper than everyone else for this.
 
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Old Britts shipping

Old Britts has a pretty slick shipping crate.

weight of 750 engine
 
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