NOT Commando but if I could have ANY Norton

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Nov 29, 2011
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The Manx is still used in certain classes of racing and the bikes are still available new for $40,000. There is also a vintage formula 3 500 cc class that often use Manx engines. Since a new Manx is $40 grand that means a good used one is still going to be expensive.

Have you thought about racing a twin?
 
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Murray B said:
since a new Manx is $40 grand that means a good used one is still going to be expensive.
Buddy Parriot's Manx, one with a long history of racing mostly in California, recently went for $44K at a Bonhams auction, plus the buyer paid to have it shipped from the USA to NZ, ouch! It did not have it's famous Al Gunter disk brake on the front, and it had new repro crankcases installed. The old parts on the Manx might not be in as good shape as new repros, but obviously historical value steps in and makes up the difference.

Since the prices of original Manx Norton's is so high, the repro-Manx is probably the way to go unless you are specifically looking to own a piece of history instead of a motorcycle.

It is sad that the real vintage race bikes are getting too fragile and too valuable to be run anymore, but on the other hand history IS important, and old original race bikes are rare enough maybe it is time for them simply to serve as the documents used to build the replicas by and run in parade-laps and at shows?

Even when run in classes requiring the production bore and stroke, an original Manx will not be competitive against the replicas that have INA needle big-ends, bigger carbs, bathtub heads, lighter pistons and coil valve springs etc. that give them more rpms and power than was available in the 50's and 60's....

Use and restoration erases history.
 
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Webby old chap, I think you have posted in the wrong section. Your posting should be in the 'For sale' section, I'm assuming condition is well-used and often people post photos of the parts for sale!
 
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Back about 1980 I knew a publican who had a collection of about 30 vintage bikes at his Sylvania Waters (a Sydney suburb) Residence. In his collection was the 1960 Manx that John Dodds had won or been highly placed in the world championship during the early 60s. After admiring his bikes on several different occasions I said I would love a ride on the Manx. To my surprise he agreed. We push started the Manx and I took the bike for a quick ride around the local streets. I will never forget the noise of the open megaphone exhaust and the way it reverberated. My ride was only for about 5 minutes and I dont think I got out of second gear. Ever since that day I have longed for another ride on a Manx.
Ando
 
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beng said:
Let's see, if I had the money for any Norton and could find one for sale, I think I would shoot for one of( in order of preference):

1. One of the three 1962 Daytona 88 racing bikes put together in the works racing department under Doug Hele's supervision.

2. 1959 Manx Norton 500, has the strong lighthouse cam drive but still the old-look bodywork that does not resemble every poorly restored/ repo-manx and boutique cafe-bike out there.

3. 1962 88ss (super-rare roadster)

4. 1962 650ss (a Norton icon)

5. 1961 650cc Norton Manxman serial #3 (another piece of Norton history)

6. 1966 Norton 650ss(not Bracebridge street, but someone would trade it to me for a bunch of basketcase-triumphs I had
next to nothing in).
http://s402.photobucket.com/pbwidget.sw ... c9333b.pbw

It's also not a Bracebridge SS, but it does get up and go extremely well. Only real problem with the bike has been self induced.

Breathed on by the Daytona winning Commando tuner Herb Becker, the clutch now slips when it hits the powerband at about 4k. I've tried new plates, new springs, stronger springs, nothing worked. It was fine before Herb did the porting.
To complain about this would be like saying I'm angry that Lil Kim has made my pants too tight again.
Hopefully the answer to the clutch slip is a Newby Racing belt drive which is going on there shortly.

Glen
 
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One of my buddies here in darkest Shropshire has a roadgoing Manx. With 12:1 CR and no kickstart and aged 60+ he can start it at home on rollers but from then on it's find a hill to stop on the top of, and hope his riding mates (Me) are feeling like some excercise. Brilliant machine for doing one thing----- Racing oh and worth a fortune. Not much cop for popping down the road for a newspaper and 20 cigs.
 
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Rohan said:
...
Remember that manxes had externally oiled valve guides - that is tough to get around, unless you want the authentic oily look.
While true that the early Manx's had exposed valve train, Ray Petty created an enclosed system that Jerry Summerfield and Andy Molnar both provide today, so not that hard to get around. My Manx has an enclosed Summerfield cam-box and is no problem.

Another impractical aspect of the original Manx's is the open primary chain with oiler. That is easily replaced with a belt drive which most racers use today

Here's a picture of a Manx engine with an enclosed cam box:

 
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You're pulling our leg Steve - can see external hairpin valvesprings. ?
 
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quote;
Breathed on by the Daytona winning Commando tuner Herb Becker, the clutch now slips when it hits the powerband at about 4k. I've tried new plates, new springs, stronger springs, nothing worked. It was fine before Herb did the porting.
To complain about this would be like saying I'm angry that Lil Kim has made my pants too tight again.
Hopefully the answer to the clutch slip is a Newby Racing belt drive which is going on there shortly.

Glen[/quote]

Either the clutch is assembled incorrectly, or you might want to try an Atlas clutch which has one extra plate, or the spiral clutch basket which locks up, but chews clutch plates up.
 
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thanks Bernhard, I 've already got the BNR belt drive here. Cltuch slip was one problem, oil leakage from the primary was the other. From my discussions with other owners of Tin primary bikes, the oil leakage is somewhat controllable at best, not fully stopable.

The BNR belt drive will stop the oil leakage and should deal with the clutch slip as well. I mentioned to Bob that this engine is making a few extra ponies. He informed me that he used essentially the same clutch on his hopped up 850 Commando (70 HP) without problem.

Glen
 
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