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Motorcycle storage, avoiding gas tank rust

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by p400, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. kommando

    kommando

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Its life in a building is 3 months, put it in a sealed container and it lasts much longer. An A4 size sheet would be enough, I use 2 or 3 large stamp sized pieces inside sealed plastic bags and as long as you do not open the bag it works for years. Its designed for warehouses and inside packing cases, it has a range of 18" in effect.

    Just an example at random, the difficulty is buying it in hobbyist quantities.

    https://www.amazon.com/Armor-Protective-Packaging-A30G12200-Non-Ferrous/dp/B00KF57TPO
     
  2. Lineslinger

    Lineslinger VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Thanks for your help.
     
  3. eskasteve

    eskasteve VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
  4. Stephen Hill

    Stephen Hill

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    I don't know how you can apply cosmoline into a motorcycle tank from a spray can. Wouldn't you miss lots of the interior surfaces?
    If you ran a heavy weight oil, like gear oil, inside a tank, would enough remain on the sides so that it would resist corrosion for any length of time?

    Stephen Hill
     
  5. JimC

    JimC

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007

    I was wondering about cosmoline coverage from a spray can, too.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
  6. kommando

    kommando

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Best to get neat cosmoline as a liquid and then dilute it in a carrier like white spirits and then pour the mix in the tank and shake to cover all surfaces, then let the carrier evaporate before fitting cap.

    ACF50 would work too.
     
  7. cyclegeezer

    cyclegeezer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    What about Silica Gel, the dessicant that's packaged in just about everything. Bought in bulk and poured into a sock or something similar it could do the trick.
     
  8. JimC

    JimC

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    A big vacuum seal bag should do the trick. No air, no rust.
     
  9. eskasteve

    eskasteve VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    I've used it on both motorcycle and outboard engine tanks, guns, old VW parts, and a whole batch of vintage outboard motors and parts, and it's always worked well. It coated the inside of a 441 tank great. I rotated the tank around while spraying. I did preheat the tank with a hair dryer prior to treatment.
     
  10. rvich

    rvich VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2009
    Post #3..."engine fogging oil".

    And it can be run through the carbs when you fill the tank with gas. What else do you want?
     
  11. norton bob

    norton bob

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    If you have set your bike up to run clean ,you can afford to add some 2 stroke to the fuel on a regular basis,this will help the bore on start up ,lube valve guides and carb slide and resist rust in the tank , a bit too much on occasion may coat the inside of the silencer too. I also cover the tank breather with a little masking tape.
     
  12. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    I personally do not like leaving ANY petrol inside a GAS tank if I store a bike, as it is a fire risk- beside the fuel will go off. I drain out the gas and leave tank outside in the sunshine with cap off- but make sure NO smokers come around. Because a tank will then rust from the inside I then pour when dry 2stroke oil into tank and swirl it around to get the entire interior covered. When I recommission the bike I simply pour fresh petrol in and swirl it around before emptying it into a container (waste not want not!) for using it for top end lubrication. Putting tank in a vacuum bag sounds like a good idea.
     
    JimC likes this.
  13. MexicoMike

    MexicoMike

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    I have used Stabil for years on winterized cars, boats, and Motos, some of them for 7 months at a time with no rust issues and engines start months later as if they had run yesterday. I can't say it works better or worse than other described methods, but it's easy and seems to do the job.

    FWIW, I bought a fiberglass fastback tank from Burton Bike Bits back in '08 or thereabouts. They claimed it was made with ethanol-resistant resin but I also coated it with Caswell before the first use. I have had no issue at all with the tank and it has had fuel in it constantly since then.
     
  14. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    If the tank was made with epoxy resin instead of OEM polyester resin, then yes it will be resistant to ethanol. Epoxies are much better overall than polyesters for composite work...better adhesion, better hardness/strength/resilence etc. When repairing a polyester composite structure, it's much better to use epoxy due to the better secondary bond strength....this is standard practise in marine repairs.
     
  15. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Silica gel or even just heat dried sand would absorb moisture. Even a perforated bag of rice would do a great job (heard this is recommended way to recover an iPhone if dropped in water...put it in a jar/tupperware and fill with rice for days/a week to completely dry it).
     
  16. JimC

    JimC

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007

    I don’t think sand in a gas tank is a very good idea.
     
  17. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Not loose sand....meant like the dessicant packs found in many products these days. Some of them are just sand....which is silica and provides a large surface area for moisture to adsorb to.
     
  18. Lineslinger

    Lineslinger VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Sand? Rice? Silica Gel? In a fuel tank?
    Wow......
     
    JimC likes this.
  19. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    And pray, How do you clean every last grain out when you want to reuse the tank?
     
  20. Craig

    Craig VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Many years ago my Wife got me a bike bag as a gift , came with a large square tin filled with desiccant .... put the tin in oven to dry and then placed bike in bag along with tin in unheated shed ... in Spring bike alloys had grown most fur ever .... ended up insulating shed and heating it .... no more alloy fur or rust .... bag is rolled up out of sight , I think maybe it was expensive ... got to love Her for trying ....
    Craig
     

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