Learner/Beginner Bike

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Rohan said:
mattthomas4444 said:
Hey thanks for the replies,

This is what I found, and I think it's a decent price.

Matt
Don't know about that part of the world, but 305cc Hondas are generally quite collectable, so the bidding may all only happen in the last minute - don't assume that will be the final price.

quote]

Those 305 have a primary chain of a rather odd size that are well night impossible to get hold off, so if you snap this chain........... other spares difficult to obtain due to it's age.
 
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This is a very old post you are replying to, and please clean up the quote so its obvious what and who you are replying to.

Don't know about the primary chain, or size, but Honda will assist with most old parts for old Hondas. It may take some time, and cost a motza though. They even have the old handbooks and manuals available on the web.

P.S. A quick search on 23120-268-000 reveals multiple suppliers e.g.
http://honda.beavertonmotorcycles.com/f ... &fveh=2854
No problemo.

P.S. There is a thriving repro parts business for old asian bikes in places like Thailand and Vietnam these days. If you see how many little bikes are sold there, you'd know why.
Did I see that some Triumph models are assembled in Thailand ?
And some BMW models in China....??

Cheers.
 
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P.S. A quick search on 23120-268-000 reveals multiple suppliers e.g.
http://honda.beavertonmotorcycles.com/f ... &fveh=2854
No problemo.

Cheers.[/quote]

I hate to rain on your parade, but a quick check on the primary chain, part no 23120-268-000 reveals that This part has been discontinued and can no longer be ordered.
I also cannot contact Beaverton on their website as I live across the pond, but if you could kindly check out with them regarding if the Honda chain is still available since its demise in the 1970s, its news to me.
CHAIN, PRIMARY DRIVE for 1961 HONDA CA72
23120-268-000
I also have a 1984 Honda 650 nighthawk DOHC that I cannot obtain a new alternator chain for as the Morse chain has a 2-1-2-1-2 links unique to this model.
 
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Bernhard, all old old Honda parts are discontinued. But if you approach one of the better dealers, they have a program to supply unobtainable parts - at least they did a few years ago. They offered to make the big-end bearings for a 1959 Benly, but found another source.
The internet means you can contact that suggested link yourself - you are closer than I am, and its your bike. Maybe they just have it listed but not available, doesn't hurt to ask.
I've bought some so-called obsolete chain at bicycle shops - they had it packaged ready to go !

Cheers.
 

gtsun

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There is also the Vintage Japanese motorcycle club, Im sure they could steer you to collectors that may have or know where some of the old stuf is..
 
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[I've bought some so-called obsolete chain at bicycle shops - they had it packaged ready to go !

Cheers.[/quote]

Well I have tried asking and as the 305 has a rather odd pitch on the chain, and they are as rare as rocking horse s**t.
If you know where to get one you will be helping some fellow bikers out there. One supplier tried to get a batch of 10 chains made up and was quoted $1500!

The 650 Nighthawk DOHC is not an official Honda UK import (we had the ropey SOHC 650 Nighthawk) and I finally managed to obtain a second-hand one from across the pond.
 
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In 1976 I was a junior in high school (I have a point to this so bear with me). At the time I was riding a Triumph 250 single that I pushed more than I rode. I was offered a ride on a friends brand new Honda XL250. It was like night and day. I couldn't believe that it had the same displaced as my tired Triumph. I always wanted to own one. I am currently working on a restoration of one but it dawned on me that while the XL is a modern bike to me, it is most certainly a classic bike being over 30 years old. These classic bikes can be obtained quite reasonably and make great first bikes with a bit of attention.
 
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My first bike WAS a Norton 850 Commando. Self taught myself back in '73. No experience riding then what-so-ever. 3 things that helped my learning curve, respect for the machinery, respect for ALL traffic, fear that I might kill myself.
I would venture out at 2 AM when the roads were devoid of traffic. I was in no hurry, took all the time to familiarize myself with the "dynamics" of riding safely. After a couple of weeks I began to feel comfortable enough to try expressways at speeds over 50 mph.
Even after 38 years of riding, I am still in "learning mode".

JD
 
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First of all, as a Canadian, I am completely unbiased when it comes to road bikes because they are all imported. Despite this complete impartiality I would rather eat a can of worms than drive a Jap (not JAP) bike.

My first bike was a ’69 BSA Star. It has many similarities to the Norton and also shifts on the correct side instead of the wrong side like all the Japanese bikes do. The 441 Victor would be a good choice too except they are not easy to find because of their rarity and high demand for them.

My cousin had a Hustler and it could run circles around my BSA but the two-strokes tended to melt pistons if driven for long distance at highway speeds. Why the pistons melted is still unclear to me.

Old Japanese bikes are going to be hard to find now because the corporations that made them do not readily supply parts after about 10 years. The bikes usually have to be retired after that point whether the owners want to or not. CB-750s are very rare today compared to Commandos but there were more CB-750s sold back in the day.

It is one of life’s great mysteries why it is easier to get parts for fifty and sixty year old British bikes whose makers went out of business more than 40 years ago than it is for a decade old bikes made by one of the multinational corporations that still exist.

Anyway, it is a good idea to make sure parts are available before buying any used bike since they are guaranteed to break something sooner or later.
 
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Matt. I don't know weather you have any experience riding any kind of bike or not. Most guys in Oz start riding in the dirt and then just naturally progress to riding on the road. It's a great place to learn because when you drop it it does not hurt as much as on the bitumen. :lol: And you will drop it. If you don't then you are not trying hard enough. :lol: Although it is different in that you steer by sliding a lot more in the dirt, the basic principles are still the same. Above all it's damn good fun letting rip with a big rooster tail and then hanging it out like some speedway rider!
So I reckon get yourself a used trail bike around 250cc and then thrash the bejesus out of it. And don't go and get anything too flash or new, because it wont be when your finished with it! Save that for the Norton. You will learn a lot about clutch/brake lever throttle coordination, weight distribution and all that kind of stuff that you don't even think about when driving a car. Don't worry about weather the gear lever is on the wrong side or upside down pattern or whatever. It's easy to adjust when you get on the Norton. So get on with it young man. Times a wasting. :wink:
 
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Still lookin around whenever I can. I havent found any great deals yet, but the Suzuki TU250x looks like a great new bike. It's got everything I'd want from my first bike - vintage styling, 250cc, and its even fuel injected so the only bike I have to worry about breaking down is the Commando. Not only that, I could see myself holding on to it for the rest of my life, I could turn it into a pretty mean cafe racer down the road. The only thing I'm not a big fan of is the two section seat...but thats easy to fix. Brand new, only about $4000 in Canada I think, and even cheaper if I buy it from the States.
http://www.suzukicycles.com/Product Lines/Cycles/Products/TU250X/2012/TU250X.aspx

Matt
 
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They had some of those when I took my rider training. Horribly small bike. I'd never ride one on the street.

Just how "I don't know how to ride" are you? Never been on a motorcycle?

DId you say why you don't want to start on the dirt? You'll learn shifting, braking and balance without the two thinks that hurt the most, pavement and cars.

And dirt bikes can be cheap.
 
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Well, as much as I dont really want to say it, I never have driven a motorcycle - been a passenger though. Bicycles however, almost every day (not sure it matters) Ive got no problem learning in the dirt, but I dont have a whole lot of access to open areas where I can ride.

Matt
 
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Matt, what ever you get (and I think the 250 you mentioned is a good choice)

YOU Are INVISABLE to MOST car Drivers !!!!!!!!

They will look straight at you then pull out in front of you and claim they didn't see you!

That was the best information I was given when I started riding, and it is true, most car drivers don't see bikes.

Graeme
 
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GRM 450 said:
Matt, what ever you get (and I think the 250 you mentioned is a good choice)

YOU Are INVISABLE to MOST car Drivers !!!!!!!!

They will look straight at you then pull out in front of you and claim they didn't see you!

That was the best information I was given when I started riding, and it is true, most car drivers don't see bikes.

Graeme
Let me just correct this: You are invisible to ALL car drivers. Ride like this and you might make it longer than most. Always, and I mean always assume they don't see you.

I like that my bike is loud enough that except for the most deaf (which are also out there) there is a chance they will hear me. Only people with zero common sense will say that loud pipes don't work. Just riding last summer I had multiple incidences in which the sound of my bike made car drivers aware I was around. Most people never look in their mirrors let alone their blind spots. But sound doesn't have a blind spot.

You haven't mentioned any required training courses available to you. Here in Oregon they are mandatory, I can't imagine Canada being more lenient. Take the beginner course, at the very least.
 
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Might want to look at a 650 suzuki savage or s-40 boulevard as they are now called. Really low seat height and super cheap (one on e-bay right now for about 1500 bucks). then later you could get a Ryca cafe kit for it (check out their web site they're out of L.A.). I still believe riding on the dirt is the best though. Cj
 
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swooshdave said:
GRM 450 said:
Matt, what ever you get (and I think the 250 you mentioned is a good choice)

YOU Are INVISABLE to MOST car Drivers !!!!!!!!

They will look straight at you then pull out in front of you and claim they didn't see you!

That was the best information I was given when I started riding, and it is true, most car drivers don't see bikes.

Graeme
Let me just correct this: You are invisible to ALL car drivers. Ride like this and you might make it longer than most. Always, and I mean always assume they don't see you.

I like that my bike is loud enough that except for the most deaf (which are also out there) there is a chance they will hear me. Only people with zero common sense will say that loud pipes don't work. Just riding last summer I had multiple incidences in which the sound of my bike made car drivers aware I was around. Most people never look in their mirrors let alone their blind spots. But sound doesn't have a blind spot.

You haven't mentioned any required training courses available to you. Here in Oregon they are mandatory, I can't imagine Canada being more lenient. Take the beginner course, at the very least.
Well, to be honest I am not sure if a training course is mandatory. I am pretty sure that it is not, however they are not too pricey, and what I learn from them will definately make it worth it. All along I have planned on taking a course, and I started looking into them just the other day actually. They have around 5 hours of classroom stuff then at least 18 hours (even more is available for more money) of parking lot and on road stuff as well, usually a 2:1 ratio of students to teachers. I'm still a little ways away from getting into it, we got a couple inches of snow overnight last night after an unheard of month of December without snow.

As for todays drivers, I am very aware that bikes go unnoticed. I've had my car license for 7 months now, and I always pay attention for bikes and give them time and space around me - probably because of you guys on the forum always talking about it :D, but thats good because otherwise I might not.

Matt
 
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You also may want to consider getting a few years of driving a car before attacking the streets with a bike. Just to get use to traffic and the such.

It's going to keep you busy learning the rules of the road and controlling a motorcycle at the same time. You don't seem like one of those kids with no sense and a liter bike the second they get a license. And a funeral shortly after.
 
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swooshdave said:
You also may want to consider getting a few years of driving a car before attacking the streets with a bike. Just to get use to traffic and the such.

It's going to keep you busy learning the rules of the road and controlling a motorcycle at the same time. You don't seem like one of those kids with no sense and a liter bike the second they get a license. And a funeral shortly after.
Yup, I am really not in a rush to get my license, I'm more anxious to get along with the Commando rebuild in my garage. I have no problem tagging along on the back of the interstate every once in a while, before I can actually drive it. Just gotta harass my dad enough to put in the final parts order at Walridge.

Matt
 
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