Fork Oil Grade

RoadScholar

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
1,753
Country flag
Any oil labeled as fork oil will work; I do suggest starting with a 15w to break-in the new parts. If you have selected springs that give the correct laden sag than you can try different weight oil until you get the damping that suits your riding style.

Best.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
5,693
Country flag
The last few bikes I've had were Japanese, and I used ATF.
Where I needed another grade, I preferred Kenny Roberts fork oil, mixing them to get say 12.5 grade etc.
 

lazyeye6

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Feb 28, 2014
Messages
925
Country flag
Hi Bernhard

what did/do you use in you Commando forks and do you like it?

Thanks

That's kinda like asking if you like ketchup or mayonnaise with your fries.
I like oil in my forks. Unless you are racing, who cares
 

RoadScholar

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
1,753
Country flag
Which fork oil make and grade do you use and do you like it ?

Try Motorex 15w, if you must have a brand name, for break-in the new parts it really doesn't matter what brand you use. And it will continue to not matter if you change it regularly; unlike most Norton owners that still have the factory installed oil and ride on happy as a clam. If someone asks them about it they'll say, the forks don't leak (the sorry seals won't pass tar). and they'll ad, it handles like a sport bike...

After a 200 miles, or so, you'll get a good sense of if the damping suits your riding style. If your Norton feels vague at the speed/roads you ride on go to a 20w, the feel WILL change; 20w is, probably, the most used. Without adjustments for compression and/or rebound damping fork oil weight has an effect on both. The OE Roadholder forks were hot stuff up until sometime in the mid 70s; compared to a modern cartridge fork they just don't offer the bandwidth. Got it?

Best.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
5,693
Country flag
Try Motorex 15w, if you must have a brand name, for break-in the new parts it really doesn't matter what brand you use. And it will continue to not matter if you change it regularly; unlike most Norton owners that still have the factory installed oil and ride on happy as a clam. If someone asks them about it they'll say, the forks don't leak (the sorry seals won't pass tar). and they'll ad, it handles like a sport bike...

After a 200 miles, or so, you'll get a good sense of if the damping suits your riding style. If your Norton feels vague at the speed/roads you ride on go to a 20w, the feel WILL change; 20w is, probably, the most used. Without adjustments for compression and/or rebound damping fork oil weight has an effect on both. The OE Roadholder forks were hot stuff up until sometime in the mid 70s; compared to a modern cartridge fork they just don't offer the bandwidth. Got it?

Best.
FYi I was not as happy as a clam on my first ride with the infamous Roadholders.
I knew nothing about forks then, and only slighty more now.
Then, surprise, surprise, it turns out that Norton had got it wrong and had been drilling the holes in the WRONG place inside those forks, hence thousands of Norton owners are riding around with a fault that, including me, don't know about!!!!!
Someone else is offering a "fix it " solution that costs $$$ ! WTF!
 
Last edited:

robs ss

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
1,411
Country flag
FYi I was not as happy as a clam on my first ride with the infamous Roadholders.
I knew nothing about forks then, and only slighty more now.
Then, surprise, surprise, it turns out that Norton had got it wrong and had been drilling the holes in the WRONG place inside those forks, hence thousands of Norton owners are riding around with a fault that, including me, don't know about!!!!!
Someone else is offering a "fix it " solution that costs $$$ ! WTF!
I think you're a bit wrong there.
Yes - the roadholders do have a damping fault - will top-out too easily.
But there is extensive information on how to fix the problem yourself - our own @dynodave has published info on this - I believe called the"covenant conversion".
So- yes - you can always pay someone else to fix any problem you have - or, get off your butt.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
5,693
Country flag
PPi
I think you're a bit wrong there.
Yes - the roadholders do have a damping fault - will top-out too easily.
But there is extensive information on how to fix the problem yourself - our own @dynodave has published info on this - I believe called the"covenant conversion".
So- yes - you can always pay someone else to fix any problem you have - or, get off your butt.
Pity you do not aim your remarks to the primary offenders of this complaint!!!!
Sad :-(
 

RoadScholar

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
1,753
Country flag
FYi I was not as happy as a clam on my first ride with the infamous Roadholders.
I knew nothing about forks then, and only slighty more now.
Then, surprise, surprise, it turns out that Norton had got it wrong and had been drilling the holes in the WRONG place inside those forks, hence thousands of Norton owners are riding around with a fault that, including me, don't know about!!!!!
Someone else is offering a "fix it " solution that costs $$$ ! WTF!

The problem is that holes in the bottom of the damper body are too low which will allow the forks to bottom out. You have some choices for implementing a fix, possibly more, but in my experience sealing the existing holes and drilling new holes higher up will permit a hydraulic lock that bleeds off around the damper rod piston; the Covenant Conversion is very effective and very inexpensive.


RGM also has new damper bodies with the higher bleed hole. Before I discovered that my wallet had greater depth I would purchase all new fork internals from RGM (damper body, damper rod, piston, cap for damper body, lower stanchion bushing, upper "high Hat" slider bushing, and the seals-3 per side). The forks behaved well, but they are still, barely, post Jurassic as you have noticed.

Landsdown and Consentino internals give you external control of compression and rebound damping, but are uber expensive. There is a post on this forum about Olins inserts. Pick your poison.

Best.
 
Top