Finally the proper fuel lines

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Les,
I am not knocking your choice. again, YMMV
Except that I, being a mechanical guy who through the years have seen plastic used.... with too much attention towards, it's use for ease of casting and producing with no regard to how long it will last in a timeline.

My cast pot steel banjos have been on my bike since my rebuild and 50,000 miles later, have not distorted the filters like the ones you just posted. I will post them if you want proof.
I am not a fan of plastic . Let that be known. I hate the product.
But that is just me rambling in my old age.
Keep on Keep'n on....
Cheers,
T
 

L.A.B.

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My cast pot steel banjos have been on my bike since my rebuild and 50,000 miles later, have not distorted the filters like the ones you just posted.
I will post them if you want proof.
I believe you. If the filters don't reach the bottom of the banjos then they aren't likely to become distorted but then they probably won't be sealing properly either, but please tell me what actual difference you think it makes to the filtration qualities if the filters are slightly distorted as I'd say it probably makes no real difference.

Ok, so two new filters inserted, the actual amount of crush when fitted I think is minimal considering the filters are made of plastic.


The banjo bolts are almost at the point of bottoming out with the banjos just tightened sufficiently.
 
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A few minutes with the calipers show .500-.525 deep on plastic and metal fittings. .510 most common.
filter housing depth. The metal fittings were primarily taller due to the thickness of the end casting, not so much the depth of the filter area.
Any deeper than .510 would be better fettled down to .510" max... finish with a fine grit.

A few filters were under .500 tall - I threw them away. 2 new ones were .517-.519". The rest of used were .502-.510" with bowed sides.;)
Remember to measure to the top of the flange not the overall height.
 

L.A.B.

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A few minutes with the calipers show .500-.525 deep on plastic and metal fittings. .510 most common.
filter housing depth. The metal fittings were primarily taller due to the thickness of the end casting, not so much the depth of the filter area.
Any deeper than .510 would be better fettled down to .510" max... finish with a fine grit.
These two plus the banjos on my T140 were certainly around 0.525" internal depth.
One is the taller banjo in the previous photos but both have since been reduced to 0.507".


A few filters were under .500 tall - I threw them away. 2 new ones were .517-.519". The rest of used were .502-.510" with bowed sides.;)
Remember to measure to the top of the flange not the overall height.
The filters are also approximately 0.507".
 
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I believe you. If the filters don't reach the bottom of the banjos then they aren't likely to become distorted but then they probably won't be sealing properly either, but please tell me what actual difference you think it makes to the filtration qualities if the filters are slightly distorted as I'd say it probably makes no real difference.

Ok, so two new filters inserted, the actual amount of crush when fitted I think is minimal considering the filters are made of plastic.


The banjo bolts are almost at the point of bottoming out with the banjos just tightened sufficiently.
Plastic has enemies. It's called UV and Temperature. Plastic gets brittle when subjected to extremes. But the constant bombardment of the Sun gets the product down to where you don't know when it will fail. The filter was only one of the issues that I have encountered with the difference of the two banjo materials but not the main one. Plastic has a shelf life and steel doesn't. At least not that I have seen. But who knows I might be wrong.
Cheers,
Tom
 

L.A.B.

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Plastic has enemies. It's called UV and Temperature. Plastic gets brittle when subjected to extremes.
Well, yes I know.

But the constant bombardment of the Sun gets the product down to where you don't know when it will fail. The filter was only one of the issues that I have encountered with the difference of the two banjo materials but not the main one. Plastic has a shelf life and steel doesn't. At least not that I have seen.
As I live in the UK then the constant bombardment of the sun isn't so much of a problem and the bike isn't outside for very long these days as I am not, and never have been a long-distance rider plus I have a collection of bikes to ride so I'm really not that concerned and I've probably had those metal banjos on standby for several years now.
 

Fast Eddie

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Banjo depth, filter depth, and the ability of dirt to pass under a too short filter is something I’d never been aware of, or thought to look out for LAB.

And yes... I fitted in line filters to my T140...!

Thanks for this info, I’ll be checking mine out shortly...
 

L.A.B.

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The banjos in my previous photos also narrow in towards the bottom which could give the impression that it's the outside of the filter that seals it to the banjo but the diameter is larger than the filter.
 
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Plastic has enemies. It's called UV and Temperature.
I have no arguement with these facts.
I'd only add that E-10 is even worse. Shrinkage and embrittlement is often the result, making the metal ones more reliable but not impervious to ethanol(water) corrosion.
 
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