Brake Lever Return Spring

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ntst8

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I recently fitted one of Norvils rear brake lever return springs - the optional extra that goes on the foot brake lever so that if the cable breaks the lever does not turn into a vaulting pole. Nothing better than spending money solving a problem i have never had.
Anyway it seems that i need to now fit a lock nut to the cable adjuster nut as this keeps working loose every time i ride. Have even lost the ferrule that the brake cable fits into on one long ride.
Just wondering if others have found the same?
 
Me too. I had the nut unscrew itself on a long ride and it almost fell apart before I noticed it. The nylon in the nut had long ago lost effectiveness and I hadn't thought to replace the nut.

I dealt with it by running another nut up against it to act as a jam nut. That seemed easier than threading a new nyloc nut all the way down that rod.

I bought one of those springs also (got mine from Rocky Point Cycle) but could not get it to fit. So I cut a rubber band from an old bicycle tube and fitted that instead. The spring is now residing in my useless spare parts box.

Debby
 
If you look at Andover Norton's web site, a nyloc nut is called for in that application. Number change, so maybe the original nut was not. I had that spring on my bike before installing rearsets,never had a problem, but always had a nyloc on it.

Item: NUT (USE 067892)
Part Number: 060797

Item: NUT 5/16"UNF (NYLOC) 06.0797
Part Number: 067892
Price: £0.22

Older Japanese bikes with drum brakes used a one piece nut and collar with a spring so loosening was pretty much impossible--see the diagram. You might be able to add a spring and make a one piece nut/collar.

Brake Lever Return Spring
 
Well the things you find out when you look closely, yes it is a nylok nut but well worn and no longer locks. Would have sworn it was just an ordinary nut. :roll:
The one piece nut and collar would be a better idea.
And as for the box of useless bits, a close second comes the bits that you threw away only to find shortly afterwards that they would have been useful or even valuable.
 
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