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What is this? And what was Heinz thinking

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by N0rt0nelectr@, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. N0rt0nelectr@

    N0rt0nelectr@ VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2014
    A friend went over to visit Heinz and Karen Keglers son. While he was there he was shown this thing Heinz had built. Looking at it I can see it is for the clutch but what it's purpose is I have no idea. I'm 600 miles away so all I have to work with is this picture.
    It looks to me to be a tool to hold the clutch but it sure looks like a very complicated way to do it, and what is the purpose of the threaded rod that has "wings" to lock it into the cross bar.
    Ideas?

    John in Texas

    Heinz (1).jpg
     
  2. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Tool for installing the rubbers in the Norton Commando cush hub....:)
     
  3. swooshdave

    swooshdave

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    You're just mean.
     
  4. swooshdave

    swooshdave

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Maybe it's a puller for when someone actually follows the manual and cranks down to 80 ft/lb on that poor circlip?
     
  5. o0norton0o

    o0norton0o VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    it could be way to use the triplex chain and clutch drum to hold the crankshaft from turning to tighten a crankshaft nut, or it could just be a home made clutch compressor.... or both!
     
  6. Torontonian

    Torontonian

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I made a similar tool from a clutch plate. It's to help tighten up drivetrain nuts.
     
  7. cyclegeezer

    cyclegeezer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    If, you unbolt that cross piece, turn the blue tool over and find that you can bolt the cross piece back on, then pass the pinned bolt through the cross piece, thread it into the clutch hub and tighten the nut on the bolt, you would have a clutch spring compressor. The pinned bolt snugged down to the clutch hub would assure sufficient thread engagement with the hub. Just a WAG.
     
    Lineslinger likes this.
  8. alan hodge

    alan hodge VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    actually it's for making hamburger patties
     
  9. Lineslinger

    Lineslinger VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    L1070086.JPG
    Similar application
     
  10. comnoz

    comnoz VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Here is a much simpler version I carry in my toolkit when I travel. It has come in really handy a few times -and not only for my bike. Just 3/16 strips of aluminum.

    I also have one for the cam chain but it's made of steel and hangs over my workbench.

    P1020880.JPG

    P1020881.JPG
     
  11. grandpaul

    grandpaul VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    I do the same with a large bolt in the clutch, but have never scotched from sprocket to hub like that. (and they are shown with opposite resistance, as in to remove, not to torque)
     
  12. Danno

    Danno

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    You'll all laugh derisively, but I've always jammed a plastic screwdriver handle between the chain and sprocket teeth.
     
  13. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    That works, but generates incredible force on the chain, and involved shafts/bearings. Emergency use only.
     
    cliffa and comnoz like this.
  14. Lineslinger

    Lineslinger VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Plastic makes more sense than metal...easier on the chain and sprocket offering a good "bite" minimizing slippage, if something gives its going to be the plastic, good idea.
     
  15. trident sam

    trident sam

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2012
    Or use the small step chock that Harley mechanics use on the primary drive, a great little tool.
    sam
     
  16. comnoz

    comnoz VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    I agree, a screwdriver handle under the chain is a good way to bend the transmission mainshaft, particularly if you are torquing the rotor nut.
    [learned the hard way]
     
  17. Danno

    Danno

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    The tools that would exert force all around the perimeter of the basket rather than using the chain's connection would seem best. I've seen lots of clutch tools made from an inner and outer plate welded together with a handle tacked on.
     
  18. comnoz

    comnoz VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    I would have to agree and I have one of them hanging above my workbench also. But I don't pack it in my toolkit.
    I prefer that for torquing the clutch nut but I still prefer the long aluminum strut for torquing the rotor nut.
     
  19. Danno

    Danno

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    I've always put it in gear with the clutch assembled and put a piece of wood across the swingarm to torque the rotor nut, but your simple tool is definitely more elegant and likely less hassle. Only issue I could see is with the MkIII's tensioner and e-start gears being in the way, but I suppose doing the nut before assembling all that would work.

    Could you list the lengths and widths of these two plates?
     
  20. comnoz

    comnoz VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Both of mine are 1 1/8 inch wide and 3/16 thick. The short one is 1.9 inch long and the long one is 6 inches long.

    6 inches works well with the stock chain drive or the tall ratio RGM drive.

    If I remember right it needs to be around 1/4 inch longer for the standard ratio belt drives but I don't have one here to measure at the moment.
     

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