Tightening countershaft sprocket nut

BERT

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In order to get the locking ring screw to line up, the countershaft sprocket needs to be on the splines in a certain orientation. From finger tight, is there a rule of thumb how many hexes should the hole be so when torqued adequately the holes line up? Thanks in advance.
 

Time Warp

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I never thought to take note of that rotation at the time so would imagine the common practise is just guess for tight with a trial fit of the nut and retainer with the screw hole to the left and aim for it.

The new AN sprocket had two holes available for the retainer screw.
70 ft/lbs but I think I backed it off a tad to fit the screw (over tighter)

tt.jpg
 
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BERT

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I never thought to take note of that rotation at the time so would imagine the common practise is just guess for tight with a trial fit of the nut and retainer with the screw hole to the left and aim for it.

The new AN sprocket had two holes available for the retainer screw.
70 ft/lbs but I think I backed it off a tad to fit the screw (over tighter)

View attachment 80477 View attachment 80476
Thank you Timewarp. This sprocket has 2 holes as well, I know that there is a correct alignment, if I don't hear from others I will record it, and post it, but prefer to save wear and tear on the threads. Thank you for your input, as it has been helpful.
 

L.A.B.

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In order to get the locking ring screw to line up, the countershaft sprocket needs to be on the splines in a certain orientation.

Ok, I don't have the parts in front of me but thinking about it, the nut has six sides, the countershaft and sprocket have six splines so however the sprocket is positioned, the holes in the sprocket will advance or retard in increments of 60 degrees so by one nut 'flat' or 'point' for each change of spline.
Tightening countershaft sprocket nut


The locking ring is 12-point so it can be moved around the nut in increments of 30 degrees. The screw holes in the sprocket appear to be approximately 45 degrees apart. If so, then the plate can be positioned to within 15 degrees of one of the two sprocket holes and turning the nut slightly will align the locking plate with the sprocket hole.
 

BERT

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Ok, I don't have the parts in front of me but thinking about it, the nut has six sides, the countershaft and sprocket have six splines so however the sprocket is positioned, the holes in the sprocket will advance or retard in increments of 60 degrees so by one nut 'flat' or 'point' for each change of spline.
Tightening countershaft sprocket nut


The locking ring is 12-point so it can be moved around the nut in increments of 30 degrees. The screw holes in the sprocket appear to be approximately 45 degrees apart. If so, then the plate can be positioned to within 15 degrees of one of the two sprocket holes and turning the nut slightly will align the locking plate with the sprocket hole.
Thank you L.A.B., that all makes sense to me. The single thread start on the shaft is defined, so if you rotate the sprocket on the spline, I am thinking one could get the holes to line up close with the required torque, with a certain configuration of the three variables (thread start, nut, lockring).From finger tight, I wonder roughly how many degrees it takes for close to the required torque?
 

L.A.B.

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The single thread start on the shaft is defined, so if you rotate the sprocket on the spline, I am thinking one could get the holes to line up close with the required torque, with a certain configuration of the three variables (thread start, nut, lockring).From finger tight, I wonder roughly how many degrees it takes for close to the required torque

I don't think so, as I said, there are six splines so rotating the sprocket one spline will move the holes 60 degrees, therefore, the holes will be in the same position relative to the nut as before but adjacent to a different flat.
 

mean gene

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Time Warp Neat tools Always something better then I use! But now that I have a pic, like the Chinese I'll have one thanks Probably not as pretty
 

BERT

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I don't think so, as I said, there are six splines so rotating the sprocket one spline will move the holes 60 degrees, therefore, the holes will be in the same position relative to the nut as before but adjacent to a different flat.
I got it. Thank you for explaining it, it makes sense to me now. Cheers.
 

BERT

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I never thought to take note of that rotation at the time so would imagine the common practise is just guess for tight with a trial fit of the nut and retainer with the screw hole to the left and aim for it.

The new AN sprocket had two holes available for the retainer screw.
70 ft/lbs but I think I backed it off a tad to fit the screw (over tighter)

View attachment 80477 View attachment 80476
Thanks TimeWarp, that is what I will do. I am grateful for the support you and others give. Cheers.
 

RoadScholar

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Before you go for final torque, with the retaining nut off, I suggest that you put some form of RTV into the "channels" on the sleeve gear and some on the sprocket. Then install the sprocket and with your finger or popsicle stick, or similar, and smooth the sealant . If you elect to not use a sealant don't leave the motorcycle on it's side stand for too long...

Start your torque at 60 ft/lbs, check the nut retainer in both positions. Now go to 65, check again. Now go for 70, one of the threaded holes in the sprocket should be real close. Now pitch the torque wrench and line up the retainer and sprocket with a suitable socket, or box spanner, you won't need much extra torque.

The majority of countershaft retaining nuts I've tangled with were loose, can't say why beyond thinking that the sleeve gear wasn't seated in the output bearing??

Best.
 

marshg246

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I forget about thinking scientifically and go by "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!". Don't get temped to just apply a lot more force - it is possible to strip the threads and unfortunately in my case it was the sleeve gear threads not the nut that stripped - sometimes having someone help is not helpful!
 

Time Warp

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Thanks TimeWarp, that is what I will do. I am grateful for the support you and others give. Cheers.

As posted above, do not install the nut as per the picture I posted, like most things on my bike it is modified.

I had given that no thought at the time and will edit/remove that picture encase someone see's it in a search.
 

Time Warp

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Time Warp Neat tools Always something better then I use! But now that I have a pic, like the Chinese I'll have one thanks Probably not as pretty

Well Gene, life is to short to be struggling at this end of it.
I can say it was a very relaxed experience fitting that new sprocket with those aids with just the click of the torque wrench (and backed off that tad mentioned)
#
If I did not have the Chinese machine tools I would not bother to have old motorcycles.
 

Derek Wilson

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Ok, I don't have the parts in front of me but thinking about it, the nut has six sides, the countershaft and sprocket have six splines so however the sprocket is positioned, the holes in the sprocket will advance or retard in increments of 60 degrees so by one nut 'flat' or 'point' for each change of spline.
Tightening countershaft sprocket nut


The locking ring is 12-point so it can be moved around the nut in increments of 30 degrees. The screw holes in the sprocket appear to be approximately 45 degrees apart. If so, then the plate can be positioned to within 15 degrees of one of the two sprocket holes and turning the nut slightly will align the locking plate with the sprocket hole.
One more variable that allows for fine tuning - the plate can be flipped over, giving an even finer adjustment. It may require a bit of hammer and anvil work to flatten it if you do go this route on a locking plate that has been used before.
 

baz

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One more variable that allows for fine tuning - the plate can be flipped over, giving an even finer adjustment. It may require a bit of hammer and anvil work to flatten it if you do go this route on a locking plate that has been used before.
That's usually what I do
Plus you can elongate the hole very slightly
 

maylar

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I figure that the lock ring will hold the nut so I start looking for the tab/holes to line up once I get to 70 ft-lbs and tweak it a bit at a time from there.
 

BERT

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I got her all torqued up, the locking ring and screw are in. Thanks very much for everyone's help.
 
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