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Removing the clutch center

Discussion in 'Other Norton Motorcycles' started by Paul W., Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Paul W.

    Paul W.

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    I have my new clutch center in hand. I’m trying to remove the old clutch center from the back friction pad. The three studs that hold the clutch springs have a nut on them and they are center punched to prevent them from backing off. The nuts are 1/4W in size, very thin, and soft. I drilled the center punch marks ever so slightly with a 1/8” drill and applied head. I’m afraid of rounding the nuts. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Hortons Norton

    Hortons Norton

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
  3. Nortoniggy

    Nortoniggy

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Well the official manual just says "remove the three nuts from the studs" which sounds simple but as you say, the nuts are very thin. You need something that has no chamfer on the end so that it gets full engagement with the nut. A tube spanner would probably be a good choice as it has a flat end and is also six sided, so less chance of rounding the nuts off. Could also try a six sided socket but grind the face flat so it gets full engagement on the nuts.

    The Andover tool is for removing the clutch and Paul has already done that.

    Ian
     
    Paul W. likes this.
  4. texasSlick

    texasSlick VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019
    Paul W. likes this.
  5. Paul W.

    Paul W.

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Correct on the socket with no chamfer. I was looking at buying a socket and spinning it down. I'll look for a spanner, too. Thanks!
     
  6. Paul W.

    Paul W.

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Pips is the correct term, eh? I'll store that in the fading memory banks. I was thinking that loctite would be a better solution. As for the tool, since I'm replacing the whole clutch pack, it should be easy enough to make at home.

    After looking at the new rubbers and the RTV silicone that the PO installed in lieu of new rubbers, I'm 99% certain that is what caused the clutch plates to peen against the clutch basket on both sides. I believe it was hammering back and forth.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  7. texasSlick

    texasSlick VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
  8. eskasteve

    eskasteve VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    I'm really hoping that there's a typo hidden in here. Otherwise I will start questioning my dedication to working on my own motorcycles as there are limits to what I'm willing to do to accomplish a mechanical task.
     
    APRRSV likes this.
  9. Paul W.

    Paul W.

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    So I remembered that there's a local cycle shop in town who specializes in old Triumphs. He's a friend of mine's neighbor, so I name dropped and he removed them for me for nothing. Now I can continue without waiting for the right tool to show up next week. All is well.
     
  10. Paul W.

    Paul W.

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Finally got the crush rubbers installed. With the correct homemade tool, it’s a snap. I bought 3ft of 1x1x 3/16”. Drilled three friction plates and tapped the angle iron for 5/16-18. Put two 3/8” nuts in between for spacers and it turned it into a one man operation. Clutches are installed and adjusted. The Venhill cable makes a big difference. However, the hole in the clutch handle is worn oblong. Now I need to order up a new clutch handle. It won’t delay me, though. I will adjust the primary chain, install the oil pump, and hopefully time it tomorrow. Then re-assemble it, add fluids and ride.

    Being a rare 82 degree day today north of Seattle, I would have loved to have been riding.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
    Hortons Norton likes this.
  11. texasSlick

    texasSlick VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
    I drilled out the hole in my clutch handle and pressed in a bronze bushing. From memory, the bushing was 5/16" OD x 3/16" ID x 1/4" long. Such bushings are available from industrial bearing suppliers.

    That took out the oblong hole, and if the bushing ever becomes oblong, I'll just press in a new bushing.

    Slick
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
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