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First Ride of 2019...Thwarted

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by Tornado, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    After four months of layup, the bike in many, many pieces ( replaced tach, gearbox rebuild, swingarm bushes & Keigler collars mod, fork seals, valve seals/spings, tank de-rusting, oil pressure gauge added, rear frame hoop de-drooped), finally had everything back together today in hopes of a first ride.
    She fired up on second kick. Oil pressure up 40-60 range on new gauge with cold oil. Idling pretty well. After a minute or two noted oil flowing from rocker spindle cover, then noted a second cover with same issue. Bolt torque snugged a bit but failed to stem flow.
    I'd attempted to cobble the gaskets out of gasket making material and recalled if was a bit hard to get then trimmed/holed as needed. So that's most likely the issue. Did use some aviation type flange sealant (the black molasses type, not a silicone rubber) on these too.
    Oh well, live and learn. Need to order gaskets.

    Consolation prize was to hop on the Bonneville and ride her out to the Wigan Pier British chip shop in Squamish, some 80 km north of where I live.
     
  2. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Sounds like a mighty fine excuse for an 80km canter to me !
     
    Tornado likes this.
  3. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Thats what shake down rides are all about after a rebuild fixing up any little problems that arise, once thats over then its back to normal riding anywhere you desire with hopefully a reliable bike, always good having a back up bike to get out and about, but I normaly fix the small problems first.
    Good luck with it and hopefully you will sort out these little problems, its all about Norton ownership, not everything works out after a rebuild like little oil speeges etc.

    Ashley
     
    Tornado likes this.
  4. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Agreed...didn't want to putz about trying another round of gasket making...got plenty of several different materials in a sampler packet, but these are fiddly to do and there are 8 of them! Need to online order...no local suppliers. Might get them by end of week. Will seriously consider going with the silicone rubber reusable type.. got them on the rocker covers and seem to work nicely.
     
  5. acadian

    acadian VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    That gasket is at the pressure end of the rocker oil feed, I had one blow last year on the highway, coated the side of the bike in oil. Get the proper gasket material from the auto section at crappy tire, works well enough in small applications like this, also helpful to pick up a punch set. The silicone rubber gaskets don't last very long though, I've got a set of JS Motorsports glass impregnated rubber gaskets on there now that are very nice.
     
  6. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    The material I used was from CT...the 12"x12" variety pack with different types.I selected the one closest to the apparant thickness of the OEM stuff...it was a fiber-based, grey material. But as I said, had some difficulties cutting all to the same shape and getting the holes (middle and two ends) precisely aligned. Just isn't worth this level of messing to get right when pre-mades are orderable. Had to try and now I know not to try that again.
     
  7. Peavey Jeltz

    Peavey Jeltz

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2019
    I agree with acadian. If you've got 40-60# of oil pressure at the top end, the rocker spindles need to be well sealed. Silicon rubber may work well for rocker covers but they aren't under pressure. Go with original gaskets and glue.
     
  8. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    I make most of my own gaskets when needed but to make gaskets you need a few good tools like angled little cut sissors, normal straight sissors, hole punch set a light hammer and some blocks of wood I ever have a old dart the ones you throw at a dart board just the pointy bit and brass body, good for cutting perfect holes using the cover and the new gasket over it push the dart in the centre of the hole and give it a few taps and the body of the dart will cut the hole in the gasket perfect from the cover, but any engine rebuilds I use the gasket set for it, but even then some gasket you get in the kits aren't perfect and good to have your own gasket material just in case, with the right tools its easy making your own but can be time comsuming if your in a hurry.

    Ashley
     
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  9. gortnipper

    gortnipper VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Do. I got mine from JS and they work great!

    Perversely, I get a small leak from the L exhaust rocker cover, but the spindles are tight as a drum.

    knock wood.
     
  10. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Just re-checked the JS MS site....these spindle cover sets of 4 run $19. so would be $40 for all 8 needed with stock cover plates. I'd like to go to the single custom plates as it seems strange to need two plates per opening, more chances to have leaks, more gaskets to replace when time comes etc. I'll put that extra $19/4 gaskets towards the single cover plates....and be done with it!
     
    Northton and Fast Eddie like this.
  11. acadian

    acadian VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010

    Many rocker gaskets allow a small pool of oil to collect between the gasket and the cover around the lower stud hole, I've gotten into the habit of punching a small hole in the gasket just above the sealing area to allow the oil to drain
     
  12. gortnipper

    gortnipper VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Yes, I did that too!
     
  13. gortnipper

    gortnipper VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Great idea. will give that a go.
     
  14. htown16

    htown16 VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    Whatever it says to torque those covers to in manual is way too high. Just make sure they are snug. I torqued them to the manual specs and crushed the gasket badly which started pissing oil everywhere. There are also one piece plates available.
     
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  15. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Sensible move sir !
     
  16. o0norton0o

    o0norton0o VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    I started up my commando yesterday and took it for it's first spring ride. It sputtered on the first few kicks, and about the 10th kick it fired up. It idled perfectly after 2 minutes of blipping the throttle. It probably needed to pump all the oil in the sump back to the tank in those first few minutes. I checked the tire pressure, and took it out to ride my local test loop. It ran flawlessly, but needed to be dusted off from sitting in the house all winter. I didn't go fast. I just got it warm and ran it around to see if everything was still working. Thankfully it was all good

    **The early season roads still have lots of sand on them put there for traction in the winter snow... Be careful out there.
     
  17. Craig

    Craig VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Frank is correct , while it is warming here the roads are still sh—t ... frost just starting to move .... weight restrictions on all 2nd roads , maple sap is running , rubber boot time .... yeah! Spring !
     
  18. worntorn

    worntorn

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Going up to 24c ( 75 f) here today, a record breaker for the first day of spring.

    It's been a nice winter for riding here on the west coast
    Ive been out a few times in October, November, December and January, often in sunshine and 10c or above.
    The only nasty month was February, the bikes stayed parked.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019
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  19. 850commando

    850commando

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2014
    i have been coating the gaskets in locktite 515 to force a seal.
     
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  20. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    I considered something more than the Aviation gasket sealer, which is a dark molasses type application and supposed to stay pliant. Didn't want a RTV or polyurethane there as risk is a blob squishing out into the oil passageway. The Locktite 515 gasket maker seems to make a good bond, but still can potentially squish out if too much in excess. Seems a bit granular when removing later.
     

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