Favorite rain gear

Onder

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No longer ride in the rain. Not even maybe. Last rain ride was for my test! I passed. :)
 
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Rain gear is suddenly relevant again this year as even on the dry side of the Cascade Mountains it is raining daily this year. Three bikers from PA pulled into town as I was walking and were wet and cold, having just come over the 5600 ft. pass. They had rain gear but I didn't notice what brand. We talked a bit about a canvas lap apron I have used for years I got from Langletz Leathers in Portland, OR. I've used it on my Commando and my airhead BMW. Works good. Eliminates the wet-boots problem. Can chafe the tank unless you take precautions.

I have worn a bright orange off-shore foul-weather sailing suit, Musto was the brand. I say was because I can no longer fit into it. I stayed dry and visible. Tested in Western Washington winters and Cascade Mountain rain/sleet. There was room for an electric vest once too. I don't remember the cost but it wasn't cheap.
 

Craig

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Easy if you at home , if you headed there , for commitments like work or what ever , then rain ride is unavoidable
 
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A couple summers ago, I took a 10k mile lap of the US on my Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport. Planning for that trip, I did a huge amount of research and of course the MG community is chock full of 100,000 mile guys so took their experience under advisement. After months of hand-wringing, I bought a (used) Aerostich Roadcrafter 2-piece suit. It was perfect from 95F+ in Florida and Georgia, to 42F in Kalispell, Montana. Completely dry in the rain, well vented in the sun. To your question, I used HELD Rodney gloves and Gasolina Typhoon boots. Both gloves and boots are perforated leather; no water protection at all. I chose Thorlo military boot socks, which I knew from a decade of wearing them are cool when hot, warm when cool, and most importantly warm when wet, like wool. I never regretted any of these choices although I'll admit to chilly fingers in Montana. I had very minimal luggage space so even multiple pairs of gloves was not possible.
If you live where it's wet *a lot*, and cool also, you probably want something else. But unless you ride for hours in the cold wet, they're great; they dry in a half hour of riding out of the water.
 
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A couple summers ago, I took a 10k mile lap of the US on my Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport. Planning for that trip, I did a huge amount of research and of course the MG community is chock full of 100,000 mile guys so took their experience under advisement. After months of hand-wringing, I bought a (used) Aerostich Roadcrafter 2-piece suit. It was perfect from 95F+ in Florida and Georgia, to 42F in Kalispell, Montana. Completely dry in the rain, well vented in the sun. To your question, I used HELD Rodney gloves and Gasolina Typhoon boots. Both gloves and boots are perforated leather; no water protection at all. I chose Thorlo military boot socks, which I knew from a decade of wearing them are cool when hot, warm when cool, and most importantly warm when wet, like wool. I never regretted any of these choices although I'll admit to chilly fingers in Montana. I had very minimal luggage space so even multiple pairs of gloves was not possible.
If you live where it's wet *a lot*, and cool also, you probably want something else. But unless you ride for hours in the cold wet, they're great; they dry in a half hour of riding out of the water.
Why did you go with the perforated gear? Just to stay cool?
 
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Why did you go with the perforated gear? Just to stay cool?
I live in S. Florida, and began the trip in August. I expected 90% hot weather, which is just about what I got; wet is really only an issue if it's cold, and I had only to worry about hands and feet in that regard. The thorlo socks are so good when wet it's hard to convey, and dry very quickly. The gloves, well, I figured I'd just suck it up when it was uncomfortably cold and with no expectation of extended cold riding it worked out great. The worst of it was actually crossing Tennessee in ~60* drizzle for an entire day, but I had to either ride through it or wait it out for 2-3 days. My core and legs stayed warm and dry, so the hands was merely annoying. The perforated gear payed dividends everywhere else; FL, GA, and across the great plains it was 85* plus most days. Crossing back from LA to Tucson back to home in October was warm enough to be glad I was ventilated. If I'd had more space, I'd have carried cross country ski gloves- dry and warm. Feet were fine throughout.
 
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I have a cheap Frogg Togg two piece I bought at Walmart years ago. It has been heavily tested and I sear by it. It's XXL so it goes on over my other gear in minutes. The hood goes under my helmet and keeps rain from running down my back. The pants have an elastic waist and go on easy over boots and all and the top is long enough to cover the waist and keep water out. I have ridden in some really heavy downpours and I stay dry. My boots get soaked however. The whole rig comes in a pouch and fits in my tank bag.
 
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I live in S. Florida, and began the trip in August. I expected 90% hot weather, which is just about what I got; wet is really only an issue if it's cold, and I had only to worry about hands and feet in that regard. The thorlo socks are so good when wet it's hard to convey, and dry very quickly. The gloves, well, I figured I'd just suck it up when it was uncomfortably cold and with no expectation of extended cold riding it worked out great. The worst of it was actually crossing Tennessee in ~60* drizzle for an entire day, but I had to either ride through it or wait it out for 2-3 days. My core and legs stayed warm and dry, so the hands was merely annoying. The perforated gear payed dividends everywhere else; FL, GA, and across the great plains it was 85* plus most days. Crossing back from LA to Tucson back to home in October was warm enough to be glad I was ventilated. If I'd had more space, I'd have carried cross country ski gloves- dry and warm. Feet were fine throughout.
And you didn’t have room for even a spare pair of gloves?
 
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And you didn’t have room for even a spare pair of gloves?
Nope. 3 sets of UnderArmor longsleeve/leg, 3 pairs Thorlo socks, 1 pair Wrangler jeans, 1 T-Shirt, 1 pair soft shoes, 1 Patagonia thin hoodie. I had of course a paper map of current locations- left behind at each change- an emergency mylar blanket, soft first aid kit, compass, phone, charger, USB battery pack, 9mm pry bar. I perhaps could have jammed in a pair of gloves, but it was tight and I didn't expect to need them. I had a couple small incidentals I don't recall specifically- spare earplugs and such.

Favorite rain gear
 
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Nope. 3 sets of UnderArmor longsleeve/leg, 3 pairs Thorlo socks, 1 pair Wrangler jeans, 1 T-Shirt, 1 pair soft shoes, 1 Patagonia thin hoodie. I had of course a paper map of current locations- left behind at each change- an emergency mylar blanket, soft first aid kit, compass, phone, charger, USB battery pack, 9mm pry bar. I perhaps could have jammed in a pair of gloves, but it was tight and I didn't expect to need them. I had a couple small incidentals I don't recall specifically- spare earplugs and such.

Favorite rain gear
I do want to ride one of those 1100 Spots one of these days.
 

ashman

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How often have you been out on a great ride sunny when you leave but all of a sudden you get caught in a rain storm far away from home, but when I going riding and have my rain gear in the rack bag it never rains usual only rains when you left the rain gear at home lol, but my Aldi specials work a treat but usually when riding and get hit by a storm by the time you pull over your pants are already wet, my leather jacket keeps dry inside for light/med rain only when caught out in a down pour will it soak through and sometime it rains without any warning so now only carry my rain gear on long travels, if I get wet and it stops the ride usually dry you out quickly, I been riding for 49 years and a bit of rain don't stop me in fact some of my best rides have been in light rain.
But when it does rain and you need to get somewhere and the bike is the only way I have no problems getting set up for the conditions and ride to the conditions, I am not a weekend warrior who only rides when its warm and sunny or who only rides short rides, some of my Harley mates if there is a sign of over cast or a hit of rain they won't go out and most of the time they miss a great ride without any rain at all, the though of getting their bikes dirty all I do is as soon as I get home and the bike chopped a bit of rain grime I just give it a quick wipe down and all good for the next outing.
A true biker will take the good with the bad, staying home because you afraid to get your bike and yourself a bit wet, its as bad as people who can't live without AC in their lives, people are becoming to soft.
As I say have the right riding gear and ride to the conditions and take the good with the bad.

Ashley
 
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