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Bleeding the brakes thingy

Discussion in 'Norton Motorcycles (Modern)' started by David Hales, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. David Hales

    David Hales

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2018
    ok, so is it the same as normal brakes to bleed?
    Brake lines go to some gizmo, I assume ant lock thingy, then to the callipers
    Do I have to bleed fron and back brakes?
    Is there any set order?
     
  2. TonyA

    TonyA VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2015
    I don't know if the front and back brakes are linked on the new Euro 4 bikes . I didn't think so.
     
  3. BLIGHTYBRIT/SF

    BLIGHTYBRIT/SF VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Mark AKA mxmartin had prob when he changed reservoirs i think ! & abs in brakes I believe
     
  4. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Generally, with any abs setup, the procedure includes activation of the ABS solenoids to allow fluid within its passages to be flushed through. Gives the most thorough fluid change and provides a way to bleed air trapped in a newly installed abs unit. Some bike like the modern Triumphs require a computer controller to be hooked up to activate abs bleed mode. Thankfully, this Triumph controller is available to home mechanics now.
     
  5. David Hales

    David Hales

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2018
    Bollox, so sounds like I am going to have fun then
     
  6. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Of course you can just do a standard fluid change as done on non abs brakes, you'll get 99% of the fluid renewed. You can also take the hillbilly approach and go out and do a bunch of ABS triggering emergency braking drills after changing fluid. .this will get some if that old remaining abs unit fluid out/mixed with the new ...

    It would be nice if the powers that be had mandated that abs units have a simple to activate bleed mode...but manufactured don't really care about home mechanics.
     
    David Hales likes this.
  7. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    I removed the footbrake and fitted a thumb operated rear brake to the handlebars which mean't running a new brake line and full flush. I just could not get rid of the sponginess no matter which trick in the brake bleeding book I tried. In the end I removed the rear caliper and rotated it this way and that and one small solitary air bubble appeared and hey presto rear brake was solid. The ABS unit under the seat didn't give me any bleed issues even after having removed the hoses to it in my despair. My verdict, dead easy to flush/bleed rear brake as long as you dismount the caliper, and no, you don't have to flush front/rear as they are on separate ABS circuits.
     
  8. Voodooo

    Voodooo VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
    A reverse bleeder is the best method. Air rises and by pushing new fluid from the bleeder to the reservoir it pushes the air up and out of the reservoir. This provides a firm pedal and is fast.
     
  9. David Hales

    David Hales

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2018
    What about
    what about hand pump version, that draws it through?
     
  10. Voodooo

    Voodooo VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
    Are you meaning a suction or vacuum from the reservoir by pulling fluid from the bleeder?
     
    David Hales likes this.
  11. Voodooo

    Voodooo VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
  12. Voodooo

    Voodooo VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
  13. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    When my tried and tested method to bleed the rear brake failed I then used a large syringe to push, and then to pull the fluid in the rear brake but neither worked. On my Commando with the rear caliper below the swingarm it would seem that the bleed nipple is not at the highest point and allowed a bubble to collect that refused to budge no matter what bleed method I tried. My only option as I said was to remove the caliper, give it a shake, push the pistons home and eventually dislodged the bubble.
     
    David Hales likes this.
  14. oldbeezer

    oldbeezer VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2017
    I have to disagree. The manufactures do care, they do NOT want home mechanics working on cars, bikes etc.
     
    David Hales and Tornado like this.
  15. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Jim,
    Is it caring or just a good business model which results in customers having to return to the dealer for everything remotely mechanically related?
    My last car, a new ford, required partial removal of the bumper (fender), removal of the front grill, removal of the battery and displacement of the ECU just to replace the headlight bulb.
    £3 for the bulb and £65 labour costs (about $90) as some of the parts needed special tools to remove.
    John
     
    Britfan60 likes this.
  16. Tornado

    Tornado VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    My current road car (Mini Countryman) is my first ever vehicle that there is no shop manual available from the manufacturer nor the aftermarket (Come on Haynes, what are you waiting for!?!?).
    This means it is extremely difficult doing even basic troubleshooting/servicing without being in the dealer service bay. Plus the complexity of basic systems is otherworldly! The door opening/closing on my previous Mini (the Cooper S) for example involves a precisely timed movement of the window open/close mechanism so that the glass is pulled down a fraction of an inch to clear the roof frame line. Could get quite expensive if your battery is dead/disconnected and you try to open/close the door!
     
  17. oldbeezer

    oldbeezer VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2017
    I think they care in that they care that their dealers make a profit in their service department. I am sure there are some valid liability concerns about untrained people working on the cars. One could also argue that the service departments need to be a viable part of the business so that they will be there when a repair or service the "backyard" mechanic is unable to perform is needed. I am concerned about some of the special tools are too expensive or not available to anyone but an authorized dealer. This could lead to the demise of independent shops then the only option will be authorized dealers and the competition for your business will only be between dealers.
     
    Eljahara likes this.
  18. Voodooo

    Voodooo VIP MEMBER

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    Aug 10, 2016
    Almost every new car requires bumber cover removal for bulb replacement.
     
  19. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    My wifes mini is young enough to still have it's original aftercare package in force (a costly option added by the original first owner). Part of that package concerns itself with the MoT (annual road worthiness check) and provided that a Mini dealer carries out the MoT check then Mini will correct any points that need rectifying which aren't normal wear and tear. Mini Charge £48 for an MoT check whereas local garage charges £30, that's £18 straight into the dealers account for doing nothing above and beyond whats required by law.
     
  20. David Hales

    David Hales

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2018
    Yup
     

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