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bench testing a podtronics

Discussion in 'Norton Commando Motorcycles (Classic)' started by seattle##gs, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. seattle##gs

    seattle##gs

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2014
    is there any way to do this? single phase
     
  2. freefly103

    freefly103

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2013
    plenty of videos and info on youtube
     
    paff likes this.
  3. concours

    concours VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    1) put motorcycle on bench
    2) test A/C output from alternator
    3) if A/C output is normal, connect Podtronics, and a known good (tested) battery
    4) read DCV across battery terms at various RPM’s
    5) if results are as expected, open beer
    6) if results are not as expected, toss Pod over your shoulder, open beer
    :D
     
  4. gtiller

    gtiller VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    @seattle##gs here are some tests you can do.


    First test the rectifier circuits.


    The regulator/rectifier must be disconnected from everything on the bike.

    Set your multimeter to continuity or resistance (when you cross the positive and negative leads, your meter will beep or read zero)

    Test One
    • Attach your red multimeter lead to the red lead of the regulator/rectifier
    • Attach the black multimeter lead to one of the yellow leads of the regulator/rectifier
    • Your multimeter should not beep, or give any reading
    • Do the same for the second yellow lead (and third if you are testing a three phase unit)

    Test Two
    • Attach your black multimeter lead to the red lead of the regulator/rectifier
    • Attach the red multimeter lead to one of the yellow leads of the regulator/rectifier
    • Your multimeter should beep, or give a reading - write down the value on a piece of paper
    • Do the same for the second yellow lead (and third if you are testing a three phase unit) write down the value each time

    Test Three
    • Attach your black multimeter lead to the black lead of the regulator/rectifier
    • Attach the red multimeter lead to one of the yellow leads of the regulator/rectifier
    • Your multimeter should not beep, or give any reading
    • Do the same for the second yellow lead (and third if you are testing a three phase unit)

    Test Four
    • Attach your red multimeter lead to the black lead of the regulator/rectifier
    • Attach the black multimeter lead to one of the yellow leads of the regulator/rectifier
    • Your multimeter should beep, or give a reading - write down the value on a piece of paper
    • Do the same for the second yellow lead (and third if you are testing a three phase unit) write down the value each time

    All of the values above zero that you have written down should be more or less the same.

    If there are any wildly different numbers, it signifies a fault with one of the diodes. This is not serviceable, do the unit must be thrown away.



    Now test the regulator circuit.

    This should be done on the bike, with everything connected - no easy bench tests without more advanced test kit I’m afraid.

    You need to have a good battery attached, as the regulator/rectifier will not give a steady output on it’s own, and the battery will smooth out your measurements, making it easier to see what’s going on.

    Set your multimeter to DC volts, put the red lead on the battery positive terminal, and the black lead on the battery negative terminal.

    • With your engine switched off, and no consumers like coil or lights drawing any power you will see around 12 to 13 volts (varies depending on the type of battery you have)
    Lead acid (including gel, AGM, flooded and drycell) are 2.1 volts per cell, so you should see 12.6 volts at rest

    Lithium based (including lithium-ion, lithium polymer, LiCoO2, lithium cobalt oxide and LiFePO4) are 3.6 volts per cell, so you should see 14.4 volts at rest​

    • Start your engine and let it idle.
    You should see the voltage at the battery drop to around 11 to 12 volts

    This shows that you are drawing more out than you are putting in - absolutely normal for the charging system of this era, and one of the reasons that the three phase alternator came along at a later date​

    • Now hold your revs at an RPM of three to four thousand
    You should see the voltage reading on your multimeter go up to around 14 to 15 volts

    Hope this helps!

     
    baz likes this.

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