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Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Classic Norton Commando Motorcycles.

Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby jimbo » Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:23 am

Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like pump gas ethanol does? If so ,what type is kind to glass?
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby grandpaul » Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:36 am

I believe so, but don't know for certain.

I'm done with glass tanks for this lifetime.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby jimbo » Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:45 am

just did a search :mrgreen:

https://vpracingfuels.com/why-sef/

VP Small Engine Fuel Ensures Easier Starts and Worry-Free Long-Term Storage



With no ethanol and other unique properties to keep it stable, VP Small Engine Fuel is an excellent long-term storage fuel. It will remain stable indefinitely in a sealed container and won’t degrade plastic, rubber or fiberglass components in your fuel system, allowing quick starts even after equipment sits idle for many months. It’s so reliable, many Fire & Rescue units have come to depend on it.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby gjr » Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:12 am

Do you have a collection of bits or just one complete bike ? If you have a pile of 'resources' take a bit of smashed gas tank or busted side cover and drop it in a jar of VP racing fuel, small engine fuel, non-oxy gas, etc. and see how it does after 6 months. If you don't have a collection of busted parts I'm sure someone here could donate some chunks for testing.

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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby Fast Eddie » Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:15 am

Usually not, hence many classic race bikes use glass tanks.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby DogT » Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:17 am

Not sure about racing gas, but I've had avgas in my glass tank for 6 years now and no problems. Pretty sure it's the ethanol that attacks the glass.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby o0norton0o » Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:46 am

if you google the fiberglass fuel tank issue, you get a lot of results related to boats, since fiberglass fuel tanks were common in some older boats prior to the introduction of ethanol into fuel. Scientific testing showed that it's the ethanol that attacks the fiberglass resins, so race fuel without ethanol would probably be ok in a fiberglass tank. With that being said, I'm still glad I changed out my original glass tank for a metal one. It was one less headache to deal with.

At one point when my glass tank was porus in some spots and felt damp with smelly fuel at the lower corners, I tried the bill hirsh sealant on that tank. What a disaster that product application was. Thankfully, I got a used metal roadster tank from Denis Cavalier for a decent price and I never had any headaches with a leaking fuel tank again.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby L.E.N. » Mon Aug 14, 2017 6:23 am

VP racing gas works fine with fiberglass tanks, as should any racing "gasoline". It's quite expensive for road use, AV gas is less expensive. Also I have removed the ethanol from pump gas via phase separation using distilled water and food coloring, a bit tedious but doable. The real problem with these techniques is that you can only go on short (one tank-full) rides. I finally removed my Dunstall tank and replaced it with an Indian-made Interstate replica since a roadster tank would have made a large gap between the tank and seat. The Interstate tank has grown on me now and I quite like it. However I just broke my throttle cable and am waiting to hear more about Don's new throttle cable setup. So no riding for the past month or so.
If going to phase separation technique you may want to add an octane booster because removing the ethanol may yield a lower octane rating for the gas produced without it.
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Re: Will racing fuel attack fiberglass like ethanol does?

Postby RoadScholar » Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:45 am

L.E.N. wrote:VP racing gas works fine with fiberglass tanks, as should any racing "gasoline". It's quite expensive for road use, AV gas is less expensive. Also I have removed the ethanol from pump gas via phase separation using distilled water and food coloring, a bit tedious but doable. The real problem with these techniques is that you can only go on short (one tank-full) rides. I finally removed my Dunstall tank and replaced it with an Indian-made Interstate replica since a roadster tank would have made a large gap between the tank and seat. The Interstate tank has grown on me now and I quite like it. However I just broke my throttle cable and am waiting to hear more about Don's new throttle cable setup. So no riding for the past month or so.
If going to phase separation technique you may want to add an octane booster because removing the ethanol may yield a lower octane rating for the gas produced without it.
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The gasoline that is blended with alcohol 9E-10, E-15, E-n) has an octane rating at least 3 point below the posted rating, the ethyl alcohol that is added has an octane rating of, about 117 (R+M/2). The alcohol enhances the octane rating while lowering the heat content of the fuel; a true win-win for the liberal assholes in Washington....

A good, short, article: http://www.fuel-testers.com/gasoline_oc ... l_E10.html

One of the reasons that I store my motorcycles in the winter with Avgas.
The allure of a motorcycle is also it's bane
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