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The Atlas Thread

Norton Models (not Commando or P11)

Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby norton bob » Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:36 pm

I have had continual problems with new fibre washers leaking. They are either made differently or they don't like whats in the fuel, do we really know what's in our tank's?.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby kernel65 » Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:07 pm

Glad I'm not the only one, I'm thinking that taking them on and off for various reasons has caused them to become less effective. I did have them sealing up okay but as of this evening it is a different story.

I've been using ethanol free gas in all my bikes, I can only imagine what the corn gas would do. I've got some more washers coming so I'll see if that works.

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1959 Norton Dominator 99
1965 Norton Atlas
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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby texasSlick » Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:11 pm

norton bob wrote:I have had continual problems with new fibre washers leaking. They are either made differently or they don't like whats in the fuel, do we really know what's in our tank's?.


I use Dowty seals whenever I can. There are places one cannot use them due to the thickness of the Dowty vs fiber, the needle and seat of the float chamber being one such.

Here is a good source for Dowty seals. http://www.fittingsandadaptors.com ....Anyone have another?

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby Bernhard » Tue Feb 03, 2015 7:20 am

kernel65 wrote:Glad I'm not the only one, I'm thinking that taking them on and off for various reasons has caused them to become less effective. I did have them sealing up okay but as of this evening it is a different story.

I've been using ethanol free gas in all my bikes, I can only imagine what the corn gas would do. I've got some more washers coming so I'll see if that works.

Scott


Copper ones are ok, and can be annealed when quashed.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby texasSlick » Tue Feb 10, 2015 4:00 pm

Some Atlas 's have the fuel filler cap left of center, some right of center. Anyone know the rationale?

I have seen Atlas/Dommie tanks on flea bay both ways.

My '63 and '62 had the cap left...both were purchased in the US.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby wilkey113 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 4:43 pm

Dominator caps were always on the left until 62, and likely some of 63. They changed to the right, after Bracebridge St closed. I don't know why, and likely nobody else would either.
Sort of a strange thing to change.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby Rohan » Tue Feb 10, 2015 5:24 pm

If you fill up the tank on the centrestand, and then put it on the sidestand (if you have one),
the right side filler cap is above the fuel level, and the left side one below the fuel level. !!
You soon find out if the cap is fuel-tight, and if the breather hole is clear .....

The trick of course is to always fill it on the side stand.
So you never have the fuel cap underwater, so to speak.....

The switch in cap side probably increased the fuel tank size half ? a gallon (useable).

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby wilkey113 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 5:39 pm

Yep, that could be the case. Certainly makes sense. It was around that time that Norton all but stopped offering the side stand though as well.
Who knows. Either way, kind of a neat break in history and a point of reference with anyone restoring a bike to be of the correct year.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby Rohan » Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:55 pm

Nortons may have stopped offering the sidestand, but you could still buy them as aftermarket accessory items.

I bought such a thing for my old dommie (the centrestand was a very heavy lift)
and after it staggered to a drunken lean a few times,
figured how to weld it to something (that could be unbolted) to make it more solid and trustworthy.

The Atlas one is tricky to fit with the engine/gearbox/primary already installed ?

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby wilkey113 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 7:31 pm

Yep, it is a bit tricky. I've seen side stands used properly, and many that are sort of mounted wrong and making for awkward use.
That being said, I'm looking for one, if you've got spare.

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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby p400 » Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:16 pm

How do you insert the new rubber pieces(040386-040387) into the clutch shock?
Are there workshop instructions detailing how to do this?
Thanks for help

P11PlateEFitProblems.jpg
P11PlateEFitProblems.jpg (108.92 KiB) Viewed 105 times
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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby BillT » Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:46 pm

There is a procedure in the workshop manual, which involves a vise, an old mainshaft, and a purpose-built tool that looks like a clutch plate with a breaker bar welded on it. Look for a Norton or AMC shop manual, post-1955.

If you're imaginative, you can come up with something

Basically, thick rubbers go in first, then twist the outer hub to compress the thick rubbers and slide the thin ones in. For disassembly, compress the thick ones, pick the thin ones out, then remove the thick

I had decent results going a different route:

I installed the thin ones first, then put the thick ones in, one by one, by squeezing them with a pair of duckbill pliers and sliding them in with a bit of dielectric grease. Nice, fresh, springy rubbers.
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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby texasSlick » Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:50 pm

p400 wrote:How do you insert the new rubber pieces(040386-040387) into the clutch shock?
Are there workshop instructions detailing how to do this?
Thanks for help

P11PlateEFitProblems.jpg


There is a tool to apply torque to the clutch center....I do not have a part number.

I made my own tool from 3 old clutch friction plates (I used 3 to get more bearing area on the clutch center - 2 would likely work just fine). the friction plates are aligned on an old center ( or remove the existing one), then drill 3 holes thru all three plates approx. 120 degrees apart, then bolt the plates together. Next weld a 1 inch wide by 1/8 flat stock strap across the center of the outer plate, and in the center of this strap, weld a 3/4 nut. To give yourself more finger room to work the rubbers, I welded the flat stock to two 1/2 inch black iron pipe unions which functioned as spacers keeping the flat stock strap about 1 inch above the friction plate.

Engage top gear, apply the rear brake, and apply torque to the welded in nut, while a second person pushes in the rubbers.

Sorry that I cannot show a pic of the tool .... I am on the road .... Be home in two weeks. PM me then if you need a pic of the tool.
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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby p400 » Thu Mar 05, 2015 5:16 pm

texasSlick wrote:There is a tool to apply torque to the clutch center....I do not have a part number.I made my own tool from 3 old clutch friction plates (I used 3 to get more bearing area on the clutch center - 2 would likely work just fine). the friction plates are aligned on an old center ( or remove the existing one), then drill 3 holes thru all three plates approx. 120 degrees apart, then bolt the plates together. Next weld a 1 inch wide by 1/8 flat stock strap across the center of the outer plate, and in the center of this strap, weld a 3/4 nut. To give yourself more finger room to work the rubbers, I welded the flat stock to two 1/2 inch black iron pipe unions which functioned as spacers keeping the flat stock strap about 1 inch above the friction plate.Engage top gear, apply the rear brake, and apply torque to the welded in nut, while a second person pushes in the rubbers. Sorry that I cannot show a pic of the tool .... I am on the road .... Be home in two weeks. PM me then if you need a pic of the tool.

Thanks Slick and Bill, great ideas. I did find a tool for torqueing this hub. Might be excessive for me to own , maybe I can borrow one locally.
I now understand how to get this done.
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Re: The Atlas Thread

Postby texasSlick » Thu Mar 05, 2015 6:56 pm

@P400

that is the tool ... You can make one from a friction plate, or one as I described. My design is compact, using a socket and breaker bar, and can be stored in less space. I think you have the idea how to proceed.

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