Welcome to the Access Norton Forum. Login as a VIP member to remove the advertising banners.


'74 Sidestand Lug

Classic Norton Commando Motorcycles.

'74 Sidestand Lug

Postby ntst8 » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:24 pm

Is the sidestand lug on the frame usually internally threaded?
My bike didn't have a sidestand for many years.
I bought a kit a little while back which includes a bolt sized for the unthreaded shank to pass through the stand/bush and the lug and the thread to project beyond, except that the lug is internally threaded so the bolt won't pass through. I hope that makes sense.
Iain B
'44 WD16H
'60 ES2
'73 850 Interstate
'12 Yamaha XT660Z
User avatar
Access Norton VIP Paying Member
ntst8
VIP MEMBER
Posts: 659
View Photo Album - Images: 6
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 1:17 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby robs ss » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:53 pm

ntst8, I see you've got a featherbed ES2 which I'm sure you'll know - the lug is not threaded but the lower side of the sidestand is so.. when you tighten the bolt into the sidestand you snug up a 1/2 locknut behind it.
Not sure about Commandos but I'm pretty sure the Norton design/sales team didn't change things until absolutely necessary (and sometimes after!)
If I'm wrong I'm sure someone will correct me
Cheers
Rob
1962 Norton ES2
1964 Norton 650SS
User avatar
Access Norton VIP Paying Member
robs ss
VIP MEMBER
Posts: 160
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 3:17 am
Location: Boyne Island, Queensland, Australia

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby kommando » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:47 pm

The lug is not threaded but if the bolt is the wrong one and is fully threaded it will cut a thread like pattern in the hole. If the hole is damaged a sidestand pivot bush can be used to repair it.
User avatar

kommando
Posts: 2128
Joined: Sat May 07, 2005 10:24 am
Location: Scotland

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby olympus » Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:42 am

On the same mater my 72 roadster doesn't have side stand or indeed mounting lug...
Reading AN pages, I note that the lug is available to purchase as well as the stand in self, which is good news.
so my question...other than trial & terror :? Offering the assembly up, laying the bike over to find the best mounting location etc. .... does. Anyone know the correct mounting lug location dimensions???

Malc
Thrust is everything....
User avatar

olympus
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 6:47 am
Location: Rochester, Kent. United Kingdom

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby L.A.B. » Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:48 am

User avatar
Access Norton VIP Paying Member
L.A.B.
VIP MEMBER
Posts: 12398
View Photo Album - Images: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 3:41 pm
Location: Norfolk, UK

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby olympus » Sat Aug 12, 2017 2:55 am

Blown away with the depth. Of knowledge here... many thanks L.A.B.
Thrust is everything....
User avatar

olympus
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 6:47 am
Location: Rochester, Kent. United Kingdom

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby NortonMKIIA850 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:55 am

I recently got the sidestand on my '74 MK2A 850 working properly for the first time since I bought the bike in 1998. The few times a fix was attempted, it always seemed to end up with a mismatch of parts. Some of this has already been mentioned, but to clarify ... You need the correct, high-tensile bolt (https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-de ... e-06-2872-) and the correct nut to be sure of a dependable sidestand. Then, you need the correct bush depending on which sidestand leg you have – you might have an original, factory stand, or you may have a 'later' design (https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-de ... g-06-2001-). I have the latter, thanks to someone who drove a car into the opposite side of the bike when it was parked, and I eventually got around to finding that it takes a different bush – AN call it a 'pivot spacer' (https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-de ... side-stand – the pivot spacer/bush for the original sidestand is at https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-de ... side-stand). Whichever Commando sidestand leg you have, something that may not be obvious, and confounded me for the first few years of ownership, but is key, is that the pivot spacer/bush is slightly longer than the hole that it fits in through the sidestand leg: this means that the bolt, nut and pivot spacer/bush are effectively locked to the sidestand bracket when tightened, and the sidestand leg alone swings around this assembly. Forgive me if I'm telling you something you already know, but it wasn't obvious to me, from the variously ancient or abused parts that were in place. On my bike, the whole business used to pivot around/inside the bracket when I got it, and there were washers under the head of the bolt and under the nut, presumably to allow this to happen. So my sidestand only worked when the bolt and nut were not fully tightened. (Crazy, right?) Because the gorillas who effected the (other driver's) insurance repair on mine seem to have hammered the old-style pivot spacer/bush into the replacement, new-style sidestand leg, thus locking the two together and once more forcing bolt, sidestand leg, pivot spacer/bush and nut to pivot on the bracket, a slight 'countersink' was created where the pivot spacer/bush meets the bracket, so I added a slimmer washer there too, to stop the pivot spacer/bush settling into it. Although I expect it would have been better to have welded up the countersink and refiled/redrilled. Obviously, too much washer there and the sidestand leg won't abut properly against the bracket. Whether or not to grease the cylindrical face between the sidestand leg and the pivot spacer/bush? In an exposed position like that, grease might quickly become grinding paste, but I felt a strong urge to grease it so I did. YMMV on that, and if I hear howls of 'degrease it!' then I shall. It might bear repeating that, when properly fitted, the side-stand leg should swing up alongside the lower frame rail: there really needs to be a rubber stop (https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-de ... side-stand) on the sidestand's peg to stop it bashing a hole in the frame. Lastly, the only thread in the whole setup should be on the end of the bolt, which is unthreaded for its length through the bracket and pivot spacer/bush. That's just my experience, and I hope it helps! Cheers.
Last edited by NortonMKIIA850 on Sun Aug 13, 2017 2:03 pm, edited 3 times in total.
User avatar

NortonMKIIA850
Posts: 88
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2017 3:51 am
Location: UK

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby olympus » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:47 am

Valid points. Indeed Sir
With all the weight acting through this one pivot, spirious parts or incorrect installation could easily lead to failure & the bike toppling. Over...... I don't know what the failure rate of the fittings were back in the 70's... but we still have problems on new machines today
My Triumph Explorer had a recent recall for the pivot bolt failure..... the bolt was originally hollow!!
And there have been many machine found laying on ther sides
Thrust is everything....
User avatar

olympus
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 6:47 am
Location: Rochester, Kent. United Kingdom

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby MikeM » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:22 pm

My 71 still has the original lug intact. Im glad I didnt put the side stand back on. I use the center stand always.
Dont need any surprises.
Learning all the time.
User avatar

MikeM
Posts: 491
- Images: 0
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:25 pm
Location: Chicago Illinois

Re: '74 Sidestand Lug

Postby ntst8 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 1:48 pm

Thankyou one and all.
Have tried to fit the bolt alone to the lug and it is a very sloppy fit so it sounds like time for a bush in there as suggested.
I did notice a while back that the centrestand pivot holes were very loose too so time to lighten the wallet on both fronts.
Iain B
'44 WD16H
'60 ES2
'73 850 Interstate
'12 Yamaha XT660Z
User avatar
Access Norton VIP Paying Member
ntst8
VIP MEMBER
Posts: 659
View Photo Album - Images: 6
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 1:17 pm
Location: New Zealand


Return to Norton Commando Classic Motorcycles

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], click, Google [Bot], murraycod0 and 7 guests