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New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Classic Norton Commando Motorcycles.

Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby 72westie » Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:18 pm

I really like that side cover.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby Rohan » Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:36 pm


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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby Matt Spencer » Tue Dec 24, 2013 4:09 am

Value :( COST :shock:

Replacement value'd be 7.500 , IF its strong - all chains & sprockets good - carbs arnt falling to bits . AND you could get on it and go 1000 miles , or lit it rip & snort . :) :lol:

Six is good value buying rather than the inflated tripe for some down at heal ones seen advertised , if not sold . Youve got to consider what YOU could get for that loot ,
without haveing to spend weeks chasing parts , seviceing , overhauling etc . Original Condition counts in un mauled ( paint , rims , spokes , frame paint etc etc )

Haveing said that 600 is a sane sound price , rather than overinflated . - IF He' is the kind to reciprocate when you need to borrow his 65 Shelby GT350R or Bently turbo .
The Japanese response to ' styling ' , was to add more .
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Wed Aug 30, 2017 5:02 pm

hey

i just found this.

i'm the guy that bought this motorcycle from 72westie.

Image

i never knew that he had posted the history of this machine here. sadly his photobucket account is screwed up, like everybody else's. i would have been really interested to see what this looked like when he first got it. anyway, the machine is currently exactly as he re-created it, except that i ditched the OIF Triumph kickstand he had on it and put one on from andover norton tha actually lets me corner without dragging, and bought a front fender stay from eurotrash jambalaya (i don't know whether i have the 70 or the 71 fender, but i currently have a combination that works). i've also thrown out the dead AGM battery and replaced it with a shorei that i took out of something else. tiny thing, weightless, and works just fine once i wrapped it in foam so it wouldn't rattle around in the battery box. still casually looking for rear passenger pegs to replace the 70s chopster cleats on it now.

Image

i've ridden mostly triumphs for decades, and this norton is an interesting change from them. first, it it starts first kick, every time, so long as i flood the concentrics (shiny-new premiers, no less) and use full choke. when it's warm, it likes tickling but no choke. when it's hot, just quarter-throttle and then one kick. i've got little experience with concentrics, as i mostly have always just taken them off and run mikunis instead, but this one has 200 mains, 106 needle jets, middle groove on the needle, and no. 3 slides. they work fine. there was some hesitation on the mains that would clear up when rolling the throttle back a fraction, so i originally thought i might try 220 mains, but after some running the hesitation went away. just crud in the jets, i guess.

it handles dead-neutral, as if the center of gravity is a ball joint in the middle of the machine. it leans with zero effort, returns with zero effort, tracks with zero effort, and i feel more comfortable at greater lean angles on it than i do with triumph stuff i've been riding for decades. brakes are no worse than anything else i ride, except for a 1997 buell that does everything better except be as much fun to ride.

it's got some quirks, though. there's a big gap between second and third, and the overall gear ratio seems a bit too high numerically. i haven't counted teeth or paced somebody else with a good speedo, but it seems like it's busier than it should be at highway speeds. but it reads 70 or 80 at speeds i'm comfortable with, and i do seem to catch up to traffic pretty quick, so clearly i need to do some calibrating to see where i really am. there's also something loose inside the left peashooter, so it ring-a-dings like a two stroke on the overrun from that pipe. i may or may not do anything about it.

anyway, the take-home lesson is that whatever 72westie started with, what he sold me was a resoundingly good machine. the only thing i would change would be to swap to clip ons and rear sets, as the seating position is the classic take-a-shit-in-the-woods squat, but i'm in no hurry. it has huge tiller handlebars. i don't know whether that's what it originally came with or not.

Image
Last edited by speedrattle on Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby DogT » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:16 pm

Should have posted this in a new thread. Nice bike. Nice colour. Definetely a later tyre and front fender. The seat is for sure a 69/70 type. Glad to hear you've graduated to the N. Good luck with it.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:39 pm

i thought about it.

but you know, this machine has gone through five owners now, and will be moving onto others when i'm pushing up the daisies.

seemed appropriate to keep the same story going.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby o0norton0o » Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:13 am

A few things: (I have a 70 commando also)

First, that key fob will ruin the paint on your sidecover from flopping in the wind.(ask me how I know that... 8) ) I ground down the head of the key to almost nothing after it gouged my leg while kickstarting the bike, then I drilled a small hole in the little bit of key left exposed and put a loop of a nylon shoelace through the hole.

Second, '70 model frames have the single bolt swingarm tube on the engine cradle. If your handling has a snake dance like feel to it, the poorly designed swingarm tube is most likely to be the cause. The Kegler clamp modification fixed my bike's poor handline to the point where it handles very nicely. (this was my biggest complaint with my '70 that plagued me for decades until I found the kegler modification posted here)

thirdly, awesome purple...

oh, and I've messed with jet sizes and the recommended size (220's) worked best...
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby DogT » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:14 pm

I don't have any problem with the key, but I don't hang anything off of it. Doesn't bother me when starting. I don't really see the issue. I agree the colour is great.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby o0norton0o » Fri Sep 01, 2017 9:13 am

DogT wrote:I don't have any problem with the key, but I don't hang anything off of it. Doesn't bother me when starting. I don't really see the issue. I agree the colour is great.


Right, you don't see it.

Do you start your bike with it on the centerstand? I don't, and I wouldn't because I'd rather stress the early model centerstand, which are prone to break, and could use some reinforcment directly between the pivot point arms.

Image

unlike the later model which has a tubular member higher up which cuts down on the length of the leverage arm acting on the frame of the stand. The early stand is no where near as strong as the later model stand pictured below.

Image

I also don't have scrambler pipes pertruding from the left side of the bike which would prevent my inner thigh from contacting the head of the key.

and finally, I have narrow 24" wide handlebars, so I have less leverage with which to keep the bike balanced when I kick it over as I hold it steady. It's a balancing act on a high compression bike. The key had gouged my leg more than once before I decided to make a few copies of it and grind some of their heads down to keep the key from ripping into me... again.

Now you should see...
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:44 pm

o0norton0o wrote:A few things: (I have a 70 commando also)
Second, '70 model frames have the single bolt swingarm tube on the engine cradle. If your handling has a snake dance like feel to it, the poorly designed swingarm tube is most likely to be the cause. The Kegler clamp modification fixed my bike's poor handline to the point where it handles very nicely. (this was my biggest complaint with my '70 that plagued me for decades until I found the kegler modification posted here)


i didn't know about that. this machine is completely stable at speed, but hands off at 35 mph it shakes its head a bit. not enough to bring on a wobble, but a definite oscillation. i'll have to look into the swingarm, as i can't tell whether the looseness is front or rear.
Last edited by speedrattle on Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:56 pm

o0norton0o wrote:Do you start your bike with it on the centerstand? I don't, and I wouldn't because I'd rather stress the early model centerstand, which are prone to break, and could use some reinforcment directly between the pivot point arms.


no center stand on this puppy. the early stands are hard as hell to find. i thought about drilling the cradle out for the later assembly, and if i simply can't get an early one i may still do that. it seems to me that welding a solid brace across the early stand would help it a lot, but i don't know what would interfere with what until i have on on it so i can see.

and finally, I have narrow 24" wide handlebars, so I have less leverage with which to keep the bike balanced when I kick it over as I hold it steady. It's a balancing act on a high compression bike.


the bars i have on it now are pretty wide, and feel fairly odd to me. i have some old superbike low bars from the 70s i kept on my bonneville until recently, and i may switch those in.

it's still odd to me how well this machine corners.

i thought that purple paint was an eyesore at first, but i have to admit it has somehow mellowed on me. i'll be keeping it, if only because it was what the machine originally came with.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby baz » Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:27 pm

speedrattle wrote:
o0norton0o wrote:A few things: (I have a 70 commando also)
Second, '70 model frames have the single bolt swingarm tube on the engine cradle. If your handling has a snake dance like feel to it, the poorly designed swingarm tube is most likely to be the cause. The Kegler clamp modification fixed my bike's poor handline to the point where it handles very nicely. (this was my biggest complaint with my '70 that plagued me for decades until I found the kegler modification posted here)


i didn't know about that. this machine is completely stable at speed, but hands off at 35 mph it shakes its head a bit. not enough to bring on a wobble, but a definite oscillation. i'll have to look into the swingarm, as i can't tell whether the looseness is front or rear.

Don't worry about a little shaking at 35mph a lot of commandos do that in my experience of it handles well it's best left alone, don't forget to oil the swing arm bushes don't grease them, cheers
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:53 pm

it's handling is perfect. if i push it down into a corner, it stays there, doesn't fight to stand back up. if i pull it back up, it comes up, with zero effort, and then stays up.

in contrast, i have a 97 buell that is vastly more sophisticated but has to be forced into a corner like getting a rottweiler into a bathtub.

if that's relatively normal, i won't worry. since my trident threw a rod, this is my daily rider, at least until the snow flies.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby DogT » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:35 pm

I got my bike in 72 with no center stand. And I also can't start it off to the side or sitting on the seat. I actually have to get myself completely up with both feet on the pegs and push it over from there with my full weight to get it through the second compression, when it then decides to start. But all in all it's been an easy starter and I haven't had any issues with the side stand. I always use a block of sorts under it anyhow to keep it from leaning so much. It's a bit of problem to keep balance correct, but I can do it off the pegs which I can't do standing off to the side or with no stand. Every time I've tried that I drop it because it's not on the stand. I know everyone says not to do what I'm doing but I've been doing that from the get go and there's been no problems, it's a matter of balance and how you can manage it. On my rebuild I put a center stand on it, but I don't use it. I should just take it off. Everyone has their method and none is best for everyone IMHO. Believe me I'm far from being critical of how anyone wants to do it.

I ran into a guy with a BSA 441 that had trouble with the oil tank hitting his leg when he started it. They're not easy to push over either. I had a BSA single 500 and parked it on a hill so I didn't have to kick it. Nice torque though but it put your arms to sleep in about 15 minutes.
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Re: New to me. 1970 750 Roadster

Postby speedrattle » Sat Sep 02, 2017 7:51 am

the 70 seat is pretty wide up front, which is nice to sit on but contributes to a tiptoe stance at a stop. i don't know what the compression is on this machine, but it's higher than i'm accustomed to.
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